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Thread: Will space debris make space exploration impossible

  1. #241
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    Below is a interesting video of a bit of space debris which almost hit the recently launched SpaceX capsule. It's speculated to be a chuck of ice but why it's trajectory is perpendicular to the motion of the space craft seems odd. It threaded the needle for sure.

    https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/News/vide...psule-77338675

  2. #242
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    "China’s Falling Rocket Body – High Sign of Bigger Problem"

    https://www.leonarddavid.com/chinas-...igger-problem/

    The upcoming reentry of China’s Long March-5 rocket body is a reminder of a much larger problem.

    China’s big booster tossed the country’s Tianhe space station module into orbit on April 29th. Now satellite and space debris monitoring groups are keeping a close eye on the uncontrolled nose dive to Earth of the large rocket stage. Leftover debris from its fiery fall could reach terra firma.

    But over what part of Earth it will reenter is a sketchy predictive pronouncement. Nobody knows for sure of the exact date/time of the rocket body’s demise.

    One report has the hardware out of control, tumbling along an elliptical orbit and falling to Earth in a few days, perhaps as early as May 9th.

    In short, the rocket body equation adds up to a dilemma.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  3. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    Below is a interesting video of a bit of space debris which almost hit the recently launched SpaceX capsule. It's speculated to be a chuck of ice but why it's trajectory is perpendicular to the motion of the space craft seems odd. It threaded the needle for sure.

    https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/News/vide...psule-77338675
    If it was from any source other than the launch itself, it wouldn't have been visible except by impact. Orbital debris isn't something you're going to spot slowly drifting by.

  4. #244
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    If this object (in the video above) is a typical piece of orbital "junk" wouldn't NASA have it in their inventory and on their "radar"? It appears large enough to rank as trackable. The way it's spinning like a buzz saw it if it had hit either of the 2 separating rocket sections it would surely cause more than just a dent. Like I said, whatever it was/is it threaded the needle going in-between the two like it did. Still puzzled by it's direction assuming that it was ice from the spacecraft.

  5. #245
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    If you look closely the object passed in between the camera and the ring that form part of the the 2nd stage-to-Dragon interface (left side). The only explanation is that it is something tiny (ice or small part) that gut unstuck from the right side of the interface during separation and slowly drifted across the camera view. Since it is an unknown object so close to the camera the size and speed can easily be misinterpreted since there are no good distance cues.

    You can go to https://youtu.be/lW07SN3YoLI?t=16865, set the video speed to 0.25 and check for yourself.

  6. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by glappkaeft View Post
    If you look closely the object passed in between the camera and the ring that form part of the the 2nd stage-to-Dragon interface (left side). The only explanation is that it is something tiny (ice or small part) that gut unstuck from the right side of the interface during separation and slowly drifted across the camera view. Since it is an unknown object so close to the camera the size and speed can easily be misinterpreted since there are no good distance cues.

    You can go to https://youtu.be/lW07SN3YoLI?t=16865, set the video speed to 0.25 and check for yourself.
    Thank you for the more complete video glappkaeft!. Check it out at 4:41:08 just a couple of seconds after separation and look to the right side of the module (with the Earth in the background). It appears that the object (or another object) passes into view for a second just before it (or another object) passes in-between the two sections. It must be a separate object otherwise if it's the same one then it appeared to change direction. I look forward to SpaceX final analyses and conclusion.

  7. 2021-May-07, 06:51 PM
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  8. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    It appears that the object (or another object) passes into view for a second just before it (or another object) passes in-between the two sections. It must be a separate object otherwise if it's the same one then it appeared to change direction. I look forward to SpaceX final analyses and conclusion.
    I can see dozens maybe 100+ objects kicked loose by the separation and while it is possible one of them (think I have a decent guess which one you are referring to) bounced off something or was affected by a RCS thruster firing and was blown back I can't see the significance of any of this or why you expect SpaceX to analyze it and present a statement.

    The entire thing is as the kids (?) say, a big nothingburger.

  9. #248
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    "I can't see the significance of any of this or why you expect SpaceX to analyze it and present a statement."

    It was reported that their immediate first thought was it must be ice but that they would take a closer review of the recording, I'm just assuming that there will be a follow up. I also see other/many small specks dislodged during the separation but all of them sparkle in the sunlight, unlike the other 2 objects.
    I can't visualize how a thruster could blow back an object? but then again physics isn't my specialty.

  10. #249
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  11. #250
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    The Space Review - "Why the US should ban kinetic anti-satellite weapons"

    https://www.thespacereview.com/article/4180/1

    The United States has long been the world leader in developing and leveraging space-based technology. While the gap between the US and other countries has shrunk in recent years, the United States remains the nation most dependent on space-based capabilities. As of June 2020, the total number of active satellites in orbit was 2,787, of which 1,425 belong to the US, 382 to China, and 172 to Russia. All other states account for the remaining 808.[1] At no time in the history of space exploration has space been more congested, contested, and competitive.[2] Since the 1960s, the global economic system has become increasingly dependent on precision timing provided by space-based capabilities, which facilitate air travel, communications, banking, and numerous other core sectors in the global economy.[3] A guiding objective in the National Space Policy published last December is to preserve the space environment to enhance space activities’ long-term sustainability.[4] Given this emphasis and the particular dependence of the US on space-based technologies, policymakers should lead the global charge to ban the use of kinetic anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons development and testing through international legislation and multilateral cooperation of all nations who have a stake in ensuring the continued use of space for the benefit of all humanity.
    I am because we are
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  12. #251
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    "Space debris endangers GPS"

    https://www.gpsworld.com/space-debris-endangers-gps/

    19% of tracked space objects threaten GPS and other GNSS satellites. While there are much fewer objects in MEO than in LEO, the risk in the former is arguably greater because GPS is so critical to almost all of our technology.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

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