Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 61 to 90 of 91

Thread: Virgin Galactic SS2

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,913
    Not my day to be accurate. Apologies all around.

    Oh, wait. It was May after all.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-May-25 at 08:14 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,161
    Track Cosmic Girl live en route to the launch:

    https://www.flightradar24.com/OBT01/248f28fa

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,161
    And FWIW...live Twitter feed from Virgin:

    https://twitter.com/virgin_orbit?lang=en

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,161
    Whoops! Looks like they had a failure.

    We've confirmed a clean release from the aircraft. However, the mission terminated shortly into the flight. Cosmic Girl and our flight crew are safe and returning to base.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,913
    How bad a fail?
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,161
    No details yet but apparently VO aborted the flight.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52802520

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,847
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    How bad a fail?
    There was an anomaly early in the first stage burn. About all that's publicly known is that it didn't damage the carrier aircraft, but didn't get very far.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,830
    I think the best thing for Branson to do would be adopting SOFIA.

    We have enough sat launchers—Stratolaunch is a better carrier aircraft as it stands. Let him sell off the other assets to the bored rich overseas...I’m sure SS2 would look nice next to some trust fund babies’ Lamborghinis, their tigers, or whatever else is used for AK target practice.

    Hang out with astronomers, Richard.
    History will remember you better. Time to grow up.

    Besides, that 747 SP would look nice with your logo on it— and maybe it could be modified for storm research and other Earthly concerns—it puts the optics of U-2 and big wing Canberras to shame.
    Last edited by publiusr; 2020-May-31 at 06:06 AM.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,532
    Anybody else having to correct people lately that while Crew Dragon is the first private spacecraft to put humans in orbit, SpaceShipOne was the first to put humans in space?
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Anybody else having to correct people lately that while Crew Dragon is the first private spacecraft to put humans in orbit, SpaceShipOne was the first to put humans in space?
    There's a bit of prejudice that suborbital spaceflight isn't spaceflight.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,945
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Anybody else having to correct people lately that while Crew Dragon is the first private spacecraft to put humans in orbit, SpaceShipOne was the first to put humans in space?
    I’ve tried to be careful to say this mission is the first commercial or private launch to orbit. What with social distancing I haven’t been discussing it with many that aren’t space geeks, so no.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,945
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    There's a bit of prejudice that suborbital spaceflight isn't spaceflight.
    It all is fairly arbitrary. I’ve debated with people that insisted that any flight in the thermosphere or even the exosphere isn’t really space flight. And there is a slightly more serious debate over the 50 mile and 100 km altitude limit.

    I have to admit I don’t take small suborbital hops nearly as seriously as orbital flight. Suborbital flights that cross a good part of the planet (even if for peaceful purposes) seem significant though.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,532
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    There's a bit of prejudice that suborbital spaceflight isn't spaceflight.
    *Gus Grissom and Alan Shepard glare from the afterlife*
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,847
    The Mercury program built toward and achieved orbital flight with vehicles similar to the ones used on the suborbital flights. SS1 and SS2 are technological dead ends, their technologies not even scaling to point-to-point suborbital flight. SS1 and SS2 are rocket planes capable of making brief hops into the upper atmosphere, not spacecraft...they are completely helpless in space, and have next to nothing to do with space travel. Lumping them in with a vehicle delivering astronauts to an orbiting space station is silly and rather insulting to the people involved with the latter.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,202
    I’ve probably said this before, but I always thought SS1/2 were actually part of a path to high speed long distance transportation.

    Otherwise, their client base is limited to wealthy people who want to see the curvature of the Earth (probably once) and whatever microgravity experiments need a few minutes of weightlessness.

    Honestly, I’m not sure if you could make a sustainable business from any of the above.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,639
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’ve probably said this before, but I always thought SS1/2 were actually part of a path to high speed long distance transportation.

    Otherwise, their client base is limited to wealthy people who want to see the curvature of the Earth (probably once) and whatever microgravity experiments need a few minutes of weightlessness.

    Honestly, I’m not sure if you could make a sustainable business from any of the above.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    IANAE (IANAX?) but my gut feeling is that there was a potential window wherein the business would have been profitable and perhaps enough to move along the path you suggest. But throw in one or two global recessions and a preventable, fatal accident and I think those dreams evaporated.

    CJSF
    "Off went his rocket at the speed of light
    Flying so fast there was no day or night
    Messing around with the fabric of time
    He knows who's guilty 'fore there's even a crime

    Davy, Davy Crockett
    The buckskin astronaut
    Davy, Davy Crockett
    There's more than we were taught"

    -They Might Be Giants, "The Ballad Of Davy Crockett (In Outer Space)"


    lonelybirder.org

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,721
    A suborbital hop to just above 100km is more like spacepeek-a-boo rather than spaceflight.

    Shepard reached 187km (and a good 300000km somewhat later), Grissom 190km. So at least they had a significant part of their hop actually in space. And their craft evolved into something useful.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,532
    Huh, I guess I generated examples of what I was talking about here just by mentioning it. Well, I’m still a fan of the SpaceShips.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,386
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    A suborbital hop to just above 100km is more like spacepeek-a-boo rather than spaceflight.

    Shepard reached 187km (and a good 300000km somewhat later), Grissom 190km. So at least they had a significant part of their hop actually in space. And their craft evolved into something useful.
    Much like the Mercury/Redstone missions reaching an altitude of ~115 miles.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Huh, I guess I generated examples of what I was talking about here just by mentioning it. Well, I’m still a fan of the SpaceShips.
    They are still cool but 10 years ago they seemed like they could be the start of something that would revolutionize manned spaceflight. Today they seem to have been reduced to a neat toy that isn't really going anywhere.

  21. #81
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,945
    Yes, my hope was that if they could make money, they could eventually go on to orbital crewed spacecraft, but they got bogged down and SpaceX went right to orbital rockets without bothering with suborbital. I do give them credit for perseverance. I liked them a lot more early on, but at the time they were the only game in town for commercial space launch.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  22. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    49,782
    Quote Originally Posted by cjameshuff View Post
    The Mercury program built toward and achieved orbital flight with vehicles similar to the ones used on the suborbital flights. SS1 and SS2 are technological dead ends, their technologies not even scaling to point-to-point suborbital flight. SS1 and SS2 are rocket planes capable of making brief hops into the upper atmosphere, not spacecraft...they are completely helpless in space, and have next to nothing to do with space travel. Lumping them in with a vehicle delivering astronauts to an orbiting space station is silly and rather insulting to the people involved with the latter.
    Exactly my thoughts, though I wouldn't say any of it was silly or insulting. I have nothing against the suborbital flights (commercially viable or not), but to me they are substantially different from orbital flights. Even if the first few Mercury flights were suborbital, they were testing hardware that was designed for and eventually went to orbit.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  23. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,721
    And then there's X15 which was quite incredible given the state of technology of the time. Talk about pushing the envelope. It was built before any American had gone into space and proved to be capable of reaching 100km rather soon after. Surely it couldn't dream of going orbital, but it sure was very early access to gaining spaceplane experience.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  24. #84
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,913
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Jun-22 at 08:39 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  25. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    So in summary they are going to be finding potential commercial customers for flights to the ISS on behalf of NASA and providing astronaut training, possibly using their suborbital vehicles as part of the training regime. It actually sounds like a good deal for both parties.

  26. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,721
    While seeing your "spacecraft" being reduced to a training craft might be a slight blow to the ego, I think it's the most reasonable raison d'ętre for these suborbital hoppers these days.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  27. #87
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    While seeing your "spacecraft" being reduced to a training craft might be a slight blow to the ego, I think it's the most reasonable raison d'ętre for these suborbital hoppers these days.
    I think it could actually work out as a marketing tool for selling flights to 'tourists'. That is that flying on the SS2 gives them a taste of real astronaut training and of course if they are using it with NASA that may let them lower the cost per seat for the tourist market.

  28. #88
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,937
    "Virgin Galactic Can Advance To Next Testing Phase After Successful Flight"

    https://www.investors.com/news/virgi...xt-test-phase/

    Virgin Galactic (SPCE) can start preparing for powered test flights after a successful second glide test of SpaceShipTwo, a key step toward the start of commercial space flights. Shares rose late.

    SpaceShipTwo flew at Mach 0.85 Thursday, up from Mach 0.7 during the first test on May 1. The faster flight allowed the space company to see how certain systems operate close to what is seen during the rocket boost on a powered space flight.

    The space plane flew at an altitude of 51,000 feet before landing back at Spaceport America in New Mexico. The test was a key step before Virgin Galactic can start taking paying passengers to the edge of space.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  29. #89
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,547
    It's kind of interesting how excited we all were about SS1 back when (more than 15 years ago! Wow!) but time seems to have passed the whole project by.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #90
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    5,847
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's kind of interesting how excited we all were about SS1 back when (more than 15 years ago! Wow!) but time seems to have passed the whole project by.
    15 years and about $1.3 billion. The whole "use suborbital tourism to fund orbital launch vehicle development" plan didn't exactly work out. And it still doesn't go to the Karman Line (which New Shepard does without trouble). Branson wants to redefine the "boundary of space", I suggest instead calling the 80 km altitude the Branson Line: the boundary of space for underachievers.

    Which makes them a particularly odd pick for organizing astronaut training and orbital flights. New Shepard would be more similar to an actual orbital launch and would provide longer and better periods of freefall for training, but I'm going to make a wild guess that Virgin won't be selling New Shepard training flights. NASA seems to be picking winners here.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •