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Thread: Looking for a Table of Most Distant Object by Magnitude

  1. #1
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    Looking for a Table of Most Distant Object by Magnitude

    I don't want to include things like GRB080319B which were transient one-time events.

    It might start out as:

    Magnitude Distance Object
    ---------------------------
    -26 +++ .000006LY +++ Sun
    -4 ++++ .00003LY +++ Jupiter
    -1.46 +++ 8.6LY +++ Sirius
    -0.76 +++ 310LY +++ Canopus

    ... other stars in our galaxy ...

    3.44 +++ 2.5MLY +++ M31

    ... other galaxies

    ? +++ ? +++ Brightest Quasar?

    I'm interested in terms of making a list of photographic targets. I did a quick Google search and did not come up with a match to what I want to see listed, but maybe it is out there.
    Last edited by antoniseb; 2014-Jul-02 at 03:12 PM.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  2. #2
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    For quasars, a good approach is to use the Vizier interface for the Veron-Cetty and Veron quasar catalog, ask it to sort by magnitude, then pull off each next-higher redshift (or grab the columns for magnitude and z, plot them, and pull out objects on the upper envelope). Since the catalog is supposed to include everything anyone has ever called an active galaxy including Andromeda), there are some irrelevant galaxy entries to sort through (you can specify only quasars with the code Q and mostly get this taken care of).

    Down to magnitude 15, I see:
    Object - redshift z - mag (V or R)
    3C 273 0.158 12.8
    CGRaBS J1459-1810 0.235 13.1
    IRAS 04505-2958 0.286 13.6
    HS 0624+6907 0.370 14.2
    HE 0502-2948 0.552 14.2
    4C 29.45 0.729 14.4
    PG 1718+481 1.083 14.6
    HE 0515-4414 1.713 14.90
    Q 0226-1024 2.276 15.2
    APM 08279+5255 3.911 15.2

    Boilerplate caveat about many quasars being substantially variable applies.

    Converting to distance needs your favorite cosmology (I usually use Ned Wright's JavaScript calculator for this).

  3. #3
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    Thanks ngc3314! That's a great start. Sometime this Winter I'll try to get some images of 3C273 (It's in Virgo, so if I don't get a clear night soon, we have several months when it is poorly placed coming up).
    I don't know how deep my camera can go, but I suspect that 12.8 is within range.


    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    For quasars, a good approach is to use the Vizier interface for the Veron-Cetty and Veron quasar catalog, ask it to sort by magnitude, then pull off each next-higher redshift (or grab the columns for magnitude and z, plot them, and pull out objects on the upper envelope). Since the catalog is supposed to include everything anyone has ever called an active galaxy including Andromeda), there are some irrelevant galaxy entries to sort through (you can specify only quasars with the code Q and mostly get this taken care of).

    Down to magnitude 15, I see:
    Object - redshift z - mag (V or R)
    3C 273 0.158 12.8
    CGRaBS J1459-1810 0.235 13.1
    IRAS 04505-2958 0.286 13.6
    HS 0624+6907 0.370 14.2
    HE 0502-2948 0.552 14.2
    4C 29.45 0.729 14.4
    PG 1718+481 1.083 14.6
    HE 0515-4414 1.713 14.90
    Q 0226-1024 2.276 15.2
    APM 08279+5255 3.911 15.2

    Boilerplate caveat about many quasars being substantially variable applies.

    Converting to distance needs your favorite cosmology (I usually use Ned Wright's JavaScript calculator for this).
    Last edited by antoniseb; 2014-Jul-02 at 05:42 PM.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Virgo also contains M49, at +9,4 the brightest galaxy of Virgo cluster and more luminous than any galaxy closer to Earth (17 Mpc).

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