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Thread: Everything about Mars except colonisation and where there specific threads already co

  1. #211
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    This week's issue of "The Space Review " has an article discouraging manned missions to Mars for the moment.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3139/1

    "As rumor would have it, the incoming Trump Administration signals the imminent demise of NASA’s “Journey to Mars.” If there’s truth to that, it’s a circumstance the space community should welcome. Sending humans to Mars is not the right way to allocate resources at this time, and maybe not at any time, for reasons I’ll elaborate shortly. While Mars as a destination deserves criticism, the very idea of sending humans to space at all will require vigorous defense in the coming period of uncertainty.

    It really doesn’t matter that Mars is (by some measures) the most Earth-like planet in the solar system. It’s not Earth-like in any way that makes it meaningfully easier to survive.
    A question was recently posed to me: Why should we colonize Mars when we aren’t even trying to live on Antarctica or the bottom of the ocean? I’m a firm believer that we shouldn’t keep all our eggs in one basket, but this simple question undeniably reveals that certain wild-eyed plans about Mars are half-baked. Of the many plausible doomsday scenarios that could befall the Earth, how likely is it to leave nowhere left that’s at least as habitable as the Antarctic? Not very. So why is it that every futurist seems to have Mars at the tip of their tongue, and not Antarctica?"


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  2. #212
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    We have permanently occupied bases in Antarctica already.
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  3. #213
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  4. #214
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    The study of the Kelly twins will play an important role in NASA's decision to send astronauts on long duration flights for example to Mars.

    http://www.nature.com/news/astronaut...travel-1.21380

    "Personalized medicine could play into NASA’s plans for how to keep astronauts healthy during long-duration spaceflight, such as any future trips to Mars. For instance, the agency might want to use genetic tests to screen astronaut candidates for cancer susceptibility, says a 6 January report from the US National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

    Actually publishing the results of the twin study will take some time, and the full data may never come out. Because of the detailed nature and sheer amount of the genetic information involved in the studies, the Kelly twins will review all information before it is published, to avoid revealing sensitive data they may wish to keep private.

    “We’re working with a small number of highly identifiable people here,” John Charles, head of NASA’s Human Research Program, told the meeting."

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  5. #215
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    An article on the most active planet being explored, Mars, and descriptions of the satellites and rovers doing it.

    https://www.rocketstem.org/2017/01/2...ns-red-planet/

    "Mars has gained a bad reputation in the past, with fewer than half of the 40-plus missions sent there arriving safely and completing their mission successfully, especially in the early days of planetary exploration. Mars is not an easy target, particularly if you wish to land on its surface. Its thin atmosphere requires more than aero-braking and parachutes to slow a spacecraft down sufficiently for a soft landing. This has necessitated the use of thrusters or inflatable air-bags to ensure that landers arrive intact, making for complex automated procedures which have to function perfectly.

    However, despite Schiaparelli’s silence, ESA’s latest orbital emissary joins a growing armada of spacecraft and landers operational at the Red Planet, more than ever before at any solar system body at any one time. These now comprise six orbiters and two rovers. ExoMars’ companions have all enjoyed spectacular success in their missions to help us understand present day conditions on Mars, as well as its past evolution."

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  6. #216
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    The looming traffic jams at Mars!!!

    http://spacenews.com/mars-looming-traffic-jam/

    "That list of Mars missions launching in 2020 is long. It includes NASA’s Mars 2020 rover, the European Space Agency’s ExoMars 2020 rover and surface platform, China’s orbiter/lander/rover, the United Arab Emirates’ Hope orbiter and India’s Mars Orbiter Mission-2. In addition, SpaceX is planning its first Red Dragon Mars lander in 2020, having delayed the mission from 2018.

    Furthermore, at the time of the new arrivals, a large number of other missions may well be healthy and functioning in Mars orbit, including NASA’s Odyssey orbiter, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) orbiter and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). There’s also ESA’s Mars Express orbiter and Trace Gas Orbiter, and India’s first Mars Orbiter Mission.

    Toss in for good measure NASA’s two operating surface machines, the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers, along with its Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) spacecraft. InSight will launch in May 2018 and land on Mars six months later."

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  7. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    We have permanently occupied bases in Antarctica already.
    Bases which are far from self-sufficient, which don't have to recycle oxygen, don't take months (requiring life support technology that is, at best, nascent) to get to, and can easily get food and spares delivered.
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  8. #218
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    Some news:
    NASA Planetary Science Division Director Jim Green said on Tuesday that SpaceX plans to launch two Red Dragon missions to Mars during the 2020 launch window.
    http://www.parabolicarc.com/2017/05/...ons-mars-2020/

  9. 2017-May-12, 09:34 PM

  10. #219
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    I take the latest report from the Planetary Society on NASA's Mars plans as pessimistic.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/casey...s-program.html

    "NASA’s robotic Mars Exploration Program is on a troubling path of decline—and decisions must be made now in order to stop it.

    This is the conclusion my colleague Jason Callahan and I reached as we prepared a new report for The Planetary Society: Mars in Retrograde: A Pathway to Restoring NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (pdf). I urge you to download it and read it yourself."

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  11. #220
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    There is no race but strangely both NASA's and China's time line to obtain samples from Mars are the same

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/spac...ple-from-mars/

    The best way to study Martian rocks and soil would be to do it on Earth. While spacecraft-mounted instruments—such as the Curiosity rover's ChemCam that vaporizes surface material with a laser and then uses a spectrometer to determine the chemical composition—are invaluable to planetary scientists, they are no replacement for a sample in the lab. The amount of compositional and absolute age data that scientists can obtain with a laboratory full of state-of-the-art equipment and chemicals to test sample materials is unparalleled, as evidenced by research conducted on meteorites (including from Mars) and Apollo moon samples.

    To continue this work, scientists need a pristine sample of Martian rock and soil, which would help build a Rosetta Stone to unlock the history of the solar system. The potential knowledge to be obtained from such a sample ranges from the formation of Mars to the nature of the planet's ancient surface waters to possible habitability in the Red Planet's past, and in turn, perhaps the secret to the origin of life on Earth.

    With so much to gain, both NASA and the Chinese national space agency are designing missions to retrieve a sample from Mars before the end of the 2020s. The missions are ambitious, incomplete, and reliant on yet-to-be developed technologies. They both start, however, with flights to Mars in 2020.

  12. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    A 1 minute is included in this post of the HI-SEAS Mars sumilation. I got the impression that they did not grow their own food in this one year experiment. Why not?
    Take back what I said about not growing food as the latest inhabitants of HI-SEAS certainly did grow their own.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/prete...18-1?r=UK&IR=T

    NASA runs fake space missions on Earth. These simulations — called analog missions — allow scientists to study what a long space mission would be like for the crew. Some analog missions study the use of specialized technology or the effects of zero gravity on the body, but others focus primarily on psychological effects.

    The HI-SEAS mission, or Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, takes place near the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii and is designed to simulate living on Mars. Crew members live in isolation for about 8 months and aren't allowed to stray further than a mile or two from their small, dome-shaped habitat. Scientists study the impact this has on the crew's mental and emotional state. Following is a transcript of the video.

  13. #222
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    Emily Lakdawalla on "Approaching Mars on Spaceship Earth"

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...spaceship.html

    One of the great things about space exploration is how it can shift your perspective. And you don't even need to leave home. Here we all are in our spaceship Earth, approaching planet Mars, the planet slowly looming larger in our forward view.

  14. #223
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    A sample return by NASA might be possible in the 2029 -2031 time frame.

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-unlikely-...-in-the-2020s/

    Despite a new emphasis on a streamlined, “lean” sample return architecture, a NASA official says it’s unlikely that suite of missions will be able to return Martian rock and soil samples to the Earth before the end of the 2020s.

    Speaking at a virtual meeting of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) Feb. 15, Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program, said that planning for the series of missions that will return samples to Earth is still in its early stages.

    “Our hopes are that the 2020 budget will increase so that we can actually start serious planning and moving towards doing missions for a sample return,” he said. The White House is expected to release its fiscal year 2020 budget proposal in mid-March.
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  15. #224
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    Not sure if it's there now, but there WAS water on Mars.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/researc...ndwater-system

    We Just Got The First Evidence of a Planet-Wide Groundwater System on Mars
    KRISTIN HOUSER, FUTURISM, 28 FEB 2019

    Mars may look like a dry, dusty planet today. But scientific models indicate that it was likely once home to massive amounts of water, both above and below its surface - and now, researchers have evidence to back those models up.

  16. #225
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    "Bridenstine says NASA planning for human Mars missions in 2030s"

    https://spacenews.com/bridenstine-sa...ions-in-2030s/

    [QUOTENASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said July 15 that, as NASA presses ahead with plans to return humans to the moon by 2024, he will not rule out a first human mission to Mars as soon as 2033.

    Bridenstine’s comments, near the end of a 45-minute briefing with reporters about the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 and the new Artemis program, are the latest sign of a renewed emphasis on human missions to Mars as a long-term goal for the agency in recent weeks.

    “We are working right now, in fact, to put together a comprehensive plan on how we would conduct a Mars mission using the technologies that we will be proving at the moon,” he said when asked when a feasible date for a first human mission to Mars might be under NASA’s current exploration plan. “I am not willing to rule out 2033 at all.”][/QUOTE]
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  17. #226
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    Article in this week's Space Review on efforts to bring samples back from Mars.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3779/1

    In November 2018, NASA Associate Administrator for Science Thomas Zurbuchen announced the selection of Jezero Crater as the landing site of the Mars 2020 rover. Mars 2020—which will most likely be renamed next year to something a bit catchier—will launch in July 2020 and land on Mars on February 18, 2021. It will then rove around Jezero, using a highly sophisticated sampling system to gather pieces of Mars and seal them in tubes each about the size of a pencil. But this isn’t just another Mars mission. Mars 2020 represents the most concrete step in achieving a goal that has been a top priority for American planetary scientists for nearly 50 years: returning samples from Mars. Launching and landing Mars 2020 will not only be an important engineering achievement, but a major psychological one. After decades of false starts and even reversals, the goal of Mars sample return—or MSR as it has long been known in planetary circles—now has real momentum.
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