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Thread: How space exploration R&D spinoff has benefited humans.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    There is lots of examples of how the R&D for space exploration has spilled over into our everyday lives. Below is an article listing some of it. Does anyone have some examples of recent R&D that has impacted our lives. Especially form R&D done using the facilities of the ISS.

    http://www.newindianexpress.com/citi...cle2621004.ece
    This Prezi talks about a many of the different benefits of space exploration as well as the benifits of spinoff technology.

    http://prezi.com/1fox6ukce-rx/?utm_c...py&rc=ex0share

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by hb123 View Post
    This Prezi talks about a many of the different benefits of space exploration as well as the benifits of spinoff technology.

    http://prezi.com/1fox6ukce-rx/?utm_c...py&rc=ex0share
    Thanks for sharing.

  3. #33
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    Here is another example from ESA on how satellites are helping farmers.

    http://spaceref.com/agriculture-1/fa...tm_source=t.co

    Farmers can now call on the latest satellite information using the unique TalkingFields service to get the best from their land while cutting the environmental cost.

    Globally available satellite data are fine-tuned to the needs of individual farmers by the Vista company in Germany, who combine optical satellite images with information from ground sensors, satnav and sophisticated crop growth models to enable precision farming on a local scale.

    "Agriculture is becoming a data-driven business," explains Heike Bach, CEO at Vista
    Vista is one of 50 expert users evaluating data from the Sentinel-2A Earth observation satellite launched in June 2015 as part of the EU's Copernicus programme. "The data are excellent," she notes.

    TalkingFields began as a project within ESA's Integrated Applications Promotion programme, and is now helping farmers in Germany, Russia, Denmark, the Czech Republic, Poland, Latvia, Hungary and Kazakhstan.

    Vista and its partners recently won a gold award for innovation at the biennial international Agritechnica trade fair in Hannover. It is the first time this industry award has been given to smart farming relying on satellite data.

  4. #34
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    Here is an example of how R&D on space technology can benefit us. Engineers developing a drill for probing Mars, the Moon and asteroids have created the world’s first portable charger to power up electric cars anywhere, anytime. A big thumbs up to space R&D

  5. #35
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    NASA gives us examples where their R&D work for their mission to Mars is finding use here on earth.

    https://www.devex.com/news/nasa-and-...-efforts-88365

    Irwin’s move to NASA would help catalyze cooperation between the space scientists and development practitioners.

    “I would walk down the hallways and talk with the most unbelievable scientists doing the most amazing research,” Irwin said of his early days with NASA. “I realized there was a gap between the great science so many people were doing and the real needs in the developing world.”

    That observation led eventually to the launch of SERVIR, which leverages data from space to improve environmental decision-making in 30 developing countries. Spanish for “to serve,” SERVIR is funded jointly by NASA and USAID and aims to “connect space to village.” It works in partnership with a network of offices around the world that have a mandate to serve their member countries and have the technical capacity to use this information to manage climate risks and land use.

    “How do we take all these zillions of bits of scientific data, how do we turn that into information that local decisionmakers, that aid workers, can access easily to help the people in those areas become more resilient to these effects of climate change?” Ellen Stofan, NASA’s chief scientist, said at Devex World.

    The first SERVIR hub was launched in Panama in 2005. SERVIR currently operates in four hubs: the East and Southern Africa hub at the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development in Nairobi, Kenya; the Mekong hub at the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center in Bangkok, Thailand; the Himalaya hub at the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development in Kathmandu, Nepal; and most recently, the West Africa hub at the AGRHYMET regional center in Niamey, Niger.

    “Space technology helps us determine those information gaps we can fill that can spur decision making and change the way we do things today and make our communities better prepared for the future,” said Robinson Mugo, who is chief party for the SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa hub.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Here is an example of how R&D on space technology can benefit us. Engineers developing a drill for probing Mars, the Moon and asteroids have created the world’s first portable charger to power up electric cars anywhere, anytime. A big thumbs up to space R&D
    Plasma drill PDF http://kunder.hey-ho.no/zaptec/media...a_drilling.pdf

    This internal combustion engine for space may have other uses: http://jalopnik.com/a-nascar-team-is...ion-1783198912

  7. #37
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    Another surprising use of our space assets to help us with research here down on earth. Excellent video explaining how it will work.

    http://www.popsci.com/next-year-biol...time-using-iss

    We can see a lot from space. Satellite imagery has gotten to the point where saying that something is "big enough to see from space" doesn't really mean much anymore. But there are some things that still elude us, like the day-to-day tracking of small animals in real time from above our atmosphere.

    One group, the International Cooperation for Animal Research Using Space (ICARUS) hopes to change that. In June 2017, the group's instrumentation will be deployed on the ISS' Russian Service Module, allowing members to track the movement of animals from insects to birds as they move around the world.

    Writing in The Atlantic, Ed Yong describes how the project will be used by everyone from bat biologists to people tracking stolen dinosaur bones in Mongolia.

  8. #38
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    India has an example of how their R&D for space applications has benefited other areas.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/tec...cle8570002.ece

    A near-invisible silica gel that would serve as a thermal barrier in cryogenic fuel tanks, boot soles and sun films may sound like a magical product straight from a sci-fi.

    But it’s a tangible reality that researchers of the Indian Space Research Organization at its Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thiruvananthapuram, have made possible.

    The yet to be christened product, the hydrophobic silica aero gel as it is known now, is supposed to have low thermal conductivity and density and high specific surface area and can be applied on any surface.

    With its “exotic properties,” silica aero gels are attractive candidates for many unique thermal, optical, acoustic, catalytic and chemical applications and are best known for their “super-insulating property.”

  9. #39
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    Did not realise that NASA produces a publication that lists their research that benefits us in our daily lives.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/nasa-spino...elps-on-earth/

    Over the decades, NASA has designed a bunch of space stuff that has wider terrestrial applications. Like memory foam, Mylar blankets and solar cells. You might be surprised what NASA has developed, which is why every year, it releases an annual publication called Spinoff that profiles 50 of these technologies.

    This year's publication, Spinoff 2017, has just landed.

    "The stories published in Spinoff represent the end of a technology transfer pipeline that begins when researchers and engineers at NASA develop innovations to meet mission needs," said Stephen Jurczyk of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate in Washington. "This year's spinoffs include products and services at work in every sector of the economy. They are innovations that make people more productive, protect the environment, and much more."

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  10. #40
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    Another example where ESA's Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission is helping Indian farmers get their insurance payments quicker.

    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Ob...urance_payouts

    For the first time in India, a state government is using satellites to assess lost crops so that farmers can benefit from speedy insurance payouts.

    The southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu is home to around 68 million people, of which almost a million are rice farmers. However, Tamil Nadu is facing the worst drought in 140 years, leading to the land being too dry for paddy fields, lost yield, widespread misery and unrest.

    The Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission has been used to alleviate a little of the suffering by providing evidence of damaged land and failed crops so that the Agricultural Insurance Company of India can compensate farmers as quickly as possible. So far, more than 200 000 farmers have received payouts.

  11. #41
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    Another example where China's remote sensing technology is helping in the Management of the ancient temples in Siem Reap province, Cambodia.

    http://www.khmertimeskh.com/5083666/...-preservation/

    The Apsara Authority has extended an agreement with China’s International Centre on Space Technologies for Natural and Cultural Heritage to continue using its remote sensing technology to discover and preserve ancient temples in Siem Reap province.

    The initial memorandum of understanding was signed in 2013 and was extended for three years on Monday.

    Sum Mab, director-general of the Apsara Authority, also requested China to provide further training to Cambodian officials on the use of the technology.

    The two sides also discussed the possibility of holding an international workshop at the end of 2018.

    Long Kosal, spokesman for the Apsara Authority, said the technology will further preservation work in the Angkor Archaeological Park.

  12. #42
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    huffingtonpost lists 7 space technologies that have benefited maankind.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...b0d86c803c75bd

    When scientists are working to solve unique issues on the International Space Station or on a shuttle mission, they may inadvertently develop a technology that is later commercialized and used to bring space-age technology “down to earth”.

    These seven space technologies literally changed the lives for millions of people all around the world. They all were originally created under the direction of NASA and were among only 75 technologies inducted into the Space Technology Hall of Fame, a organization dedicated to increasing public awareness of the benefits of space exploration and encouraging further innovation by recognizing individuals, organizations and companies that effectively adapt and market technologies originally developed for space to improve the quality of life for all humanity. Some of the technologies outlined below are household names and others very likely will be. Here are some of the best of the best.

  13. #43
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    An example from India on how their satellites are helping with managing resources down here on earth.

    https://www.isro.gov.in/resourcesat-...one-year-space

    India, with nearly 3.3 million sq.km. geographical area, is endowed with natural resources such as forests, crop lands, water resources, minerals, wetlands, snow and glaciers etc. The accurate information on the availability of natural resources and their optimal management is vital for sustainable development and overall socio-economic growth of the country.

    Resourcesat series of satellites, with a unique 3 tier imaging capability, have created its own ‘niche’ in catering to multitude of applications, specifically in the area of land and water resources management. The first satellite of Resourcesat series, Resourcesat-1 was launched in the year 2003 followed by Resourcesat-2 in year 2011.
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2018-Jan-02 at 09:36 AM.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Did not realise that NASA produces a publication that lists their research that benefits us in our daily lives.

    This year's publication, Spinoff 2017, has just landed.
    NASA has released Spinoff 2018.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/pr...38&filter=1639

    The 2018 edition of NASA's annual Spinoff publication, released Tuesday, features 49 technologies the agency helped create that are used in almost every facet of modern life. These include innovations that help find disaster survivors trapped under rubble, purify air and surfaces to stop the spread of germs, and test new materials for everything from airplanes to athletic shoes.

    "NASA's work represents an investment in the future, not just for air and space travel, but for the nation," said Stephen Jurczyk, associate administrator of the Space Technology Mission Directorate in Washington. "At the same time that NASA's space exploration missions are inspiring young people to become scientists and engineers, the agency's work in support of those missions is creating jobs for them across many industrial sectors. Commercial technology spun off from NASA research and technology programs, and missions creates new companies, grows the economy, saves money, keeps us safer, and even saves lives."

  15. #45
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    Here is an example of using space assets to identify new archeological sites on earth.

    http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/201..._137124541.htm

    Ten new archeological sites in southern Tunisia were discovered thanks to Chinese space-based remote sensing technology, Tunisian authorities said here Thursday.

    The archaeological sites, dating back to ancient Roman times, are located in three Tunisian provinces -- Gafsa, Tataouine and Medenine, said Tunisian Culture Minister Mohamed Zine El-Abidine at a press conference.

    The discoveries included some Roman forts, limes, a water supply system, three giant basins and a cemetery.

    The limes are in some ways walls and forts that surrounded rivers of ancient Roman cities for protection.

    The findings were made by a team of Chinese, Tunisian, Italian and Pakistani scientists using the Chinese technology for the first time in the country under a program named the Digital Belt and Road (DBAR).

  16. #46
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    "How space technology benefits the Earth"

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3768/1

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify and explain current and potential benefits of space-based capabilities for life on Earth from environmental, social, and economic perspectives, including:

    Space activities having a positive impact today (such as Earth observation for weather and climate)
    Space activities that could have a positive impact in the next 5 to 20 years (such as communications satellite megaconstellations)
    Space activities that could have a positive impact in the more distant future (such as widespread space manufacturing and industrialization)
    In what follows, we describe nearly 30 types of activities that either confer significant benefits now, or could provide positive impacts in the coming decades.
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  17. #47
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    "NASA Apollo Program Helped Boost US Food Safety"

    https://www.voanews.com/science-heal...us-food-safety

    Americans are less likely to get food poisoning this Thanksgiving thanks to NASA. Yes, NASA. The space agency’s Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system created decades ago for the lunar landing initiative is credited to this day with reducing foodborne illnesses.

    Originally developed for astronaut food in the early days of the Apollo program, the HACCP system has been adopted by major players in the food industry.

    Sixty years ago, at what is now Johnson Space Center in Houston, a nutritionist and a Pillsbury microbiologist partnered with NASA to provide uncontaminated food for the astronauts on the Gemini and Apollo missions.

    Instead of testing end products, Paul Lachance and Howard Bauman came up with a method that identified and controlled potential points of failure in the food production process.

    To make astronaut food safe, the duo introduced hazards in the production line, observed the hazard and determined how it could be prevented.
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