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Thread: Mars 2020 Rover - "Perseverance"

  1. #61
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    The plan was to do a mid course correction around day 15 also.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    The plan was to do a mid course correction around day 15 also.
    They have carried it out. High lights mine,

    https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/08/1...to-red-planet/

    NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover launched from Cape Canaveral on July 30, following successful launchings with the United Arab Emirates’ Hope orbiter July 19 and China’s Tianwen 1 Mars mission July 23.

    The missions launched during a period of several weeks when Earth and Mars were in the right positions in their orbits around the sun to permit a direct route between the planets. All three spacecraft are due to arrive at Mars in February 2021.

    NASA said Aug. 14 that the Mars 2020 mission’s first trajectory correction maneuver, or TCM, was a success. The spacecraft fired eight thrusters to adjust its course toward Mars, beginning to shift the probe’s initial post-launch aim point on to the Red Planet.
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  3. #63
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    "Sensors on Mars 2020 Spacecraft Answer Long-Distance Call From Earth"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Se...Earth_999.html

    On Oct. 8, 2020, with COVID-19 safety protocols in place, team members of the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission waited for a reply from the Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation 2 (MEDLI2) suite onboard the spacecraft, which is currently en route to the Red Planet.

    MEDLI2 is a collection of sensors that will measure aerothermal environments and thermal protection system material performance during the atmospheric entry phase of the Mars 2020 mission.

    The sensors successfully passed a battery of environmental tests before being installed on the Mars 2020 heat shield and backshell to ensure they could withstand launch and the harsh conditions of space.

    During the recent MEDLI2 cruise checkout, the team at the Flight Mission Support Center at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, received data back from the spacecraft for the first time since the rover launched in July.

    "This is the first time MEDLI2 has been tested since before launch," said Henry Wright, MEDLI2 project manager. "The test went great; we got the data we wanted, and everything looks like we predicted it would."
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  4. #64
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    There was supposed to be a second mid course burn ~30 Sep 20, but I have been unable to find out if it was executed or abandoned. Have any of your sources printed an answer?

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    There was supposed to be a second mid course burn ~30 Sep 20, but I have been unable to find out if it was executed or abandoned. Have any of your sources printed an answer?
    I could not find any. Sorry.
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  6. #66
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    "NASA's Perseverance Rover Is Midway to Mars"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NA..._Mars_999.html

    NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission has logged a lot of flight miles since being lofted skyward on July 30 - 146.3 million miles (235.4 million kilometers) to be exact. Turns out that is exactly the same distance it has to go before the spacecraft hits the Red Planet's atmosphere like a 11,900 mph (19,000 kph) freight train on Feb. 18, 2021.

    "At 1:40 p.m. Pacific Time Tuesday Oct 27, our spacecraft will have just as many miles in its metaphorical rearview mirror as it will out its metaphorical windshield," said Julie Kangas, a navigator working on the Perseverance rover mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. "While I don't think there will be cake, especially since most of us are working from home, it's still a pretty neat milestone. Next stop, Jezero Crater."
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  7. #67
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    "NASA's Perseverance Rover 100 Days Out"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NA...s_Out_999.html

    On Nov. 9, the mission team confirmed that the propulsion subsystem of the descent stage, which will help lower the rover onto Mars, is in good working order. Today, Nov. 10, they turn their attention to the rover's PIXL and SHERLOC instruments.

    The Lander Vision System is scheduled to go under the microscope on Nov. 11; and the SuperCam instrument, the day after that. Down the road, on Dec. 18, the team plans to perform a trajectory correction maneuver, using the cruise stage's eight thrusters to refine the spacecraft's path toward Mars.

    The mission has already held several test scenarios to help evaluate procedures and train Mars 2020 mission controllers for important milestones to come. During some of these multi-day-long tests, the team encounters unexpected challenges thrown their way by colleagues who play the role of "gremlins." Even with the challenges introduced during a landing rehearsal back on Oct. 29, the team was able to successfully land a simulated Perseverance rover on Mars.
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  8. #68
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    "NASA's Mars rover Perseverance lands on the Red Planet in less than a month!"

    https://www.space.com/mars-rover-per...ding-one-month

    The touchdown of NASA's next Mars rover is less than a month away.

    The car-size Perseverance rover, the core of NASA's $2.7 billion Mars 2020 mission, will land Feb. 18, kicking off a new era of Red Planet exploration.

    On that fateful day, a rocket-powered sky crane will lower Perseverance to the floor of the 28-mile-wide (45 kilometers) Jezero Crater, which hosted a lake and a river delta billions of years ago. Over the course of its mission, Perseverance will scour Jezero for signs of ancient Mars life and collect and cache dozens of samples.
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  9. #69
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    "Six things to know about NASA's Mars helicopter on its way to Mars"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Si..._Mars_999.html

    Ingenuity, a technology experiment, is preparing to attempt the first powered, controlled flight on the Red Planet.

    When NASA's Perseverance rover lands on Mars on Feb. 18, 2021, it will be carrying a small but mighty passenger: Ingenuity, the Mars Helicopter.

    The helicopter, which weighs about 4 pounds (1.8 kilograms) on Earth and has a fuselage about the size of a tissue box, started out six years ago as an implausible prospect. Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California knew it was theoretically possible to fly in Mars' thin atmosphere, but no one was sure whether they could build a vehicle powerful enough to fly, communicate, and survive autonomously with the extreme restrictions on its mass.
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  10. #70
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    NASA's Perseverance Rover 22 days from Mars landing

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NA...nding_999.html
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  11. #71
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    Those landings make me nervous. I waited until after hearing about Curiosity’s successful landing before watching videos of it as info came back. I think it is the two billion dollar cost and for Curiosity, the novel landing process that especially set my concerns high. At least now they have more experience.

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  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Those landings make me nervous. I waited until after hearing about Curiosity’s successful landing before watching videos of it as info came back. I think it is the two billion dollar cost and for Curiosity, the novel landing process that especially set my concerns high. At least now they have more experience.
    Totally agree, won't watch until later. I don't watch liftoffs, reentrys, anything anymore. Too many Shuttle explosions, Mars orbiter explosions, etc.
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  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Those landings make me nervous. I waited until after hearing about Curiosity’s successful landing before watching videos of it as info came back. I think it is the two billion dollar cost and for Curiosity, the novel landing process that especially set my concerns high. At least now they have more experience.
    What was the phrase, seven minutes of terror or some such? That landing process just seems insanely complicated.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What was the phrase, seven minutes of terror or some such? That landing process just seems insanely complicated.
    Here's a video of the 7 minutes.

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/27/world...rnd/index.html
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  15. #75
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    On this JPL page is an animation which shows each stage of EDL. You can increase or decrease the animation speed.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nas...m-mars-landing

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What was the phrase, seven minutes of terror or some such? That landing process just seems insanely complicated.
    That's the fundamental problem of Mars EDL. Once you get to something massing as large as Curiosity or Perseverance, your options for slowing down and landing this type of mission where you want to are very narrow. 100% propulsive landing kicks up debris that can damage the rover, and the airbag bounce of the MER missions is not safe for this kind of the payload and would likely be too heavy. Sure it's complicated, but it's still the best option for getting and intact rover/package onto the surface. I still feel for the lost payload mass due to the skycrane itself. It's big and complicated enough to be its own mission. Until we have something like Starship slinging huge payloads to Mars, we're sort of stuck with this kind of option for these sorts of payloads.

    CJSF
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  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    On this JPL page is an animation which shows each stage of EDL. You can increase or decrease the animation speed.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nas...m-mars-landing
    I assume that video is specifically for Perseverance, but I can’t tell how it is different from the equivalent CGI landing video for Curiosity, which I’m sure I watched a dozen times or so but not for years, so I no doubt have forgotten subtle details. In any case, a very similar process (which is a good thing in my book).

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  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    That's the fundamental problem of Mars EDL. Once you get to something massing as large as Curiosity or Perseverance, your options for slowing down and landing this type of mission where you want to are very narrow. 100% propulsive landing kicks up debris that can damage the rover, and the airbag bounce of the MER missions is not safe for this kind of the payload and would likely be too heavy. Sure it's complicated, but it's still the best option for getting and intact rover/package onto the surface. I still feel for the lost payload mass due to the skycrane itself. It's big and complicated enough to be its own mission. Until we have something like Starship slinging huge payloads to Mars, we're sort of stuck with this kind of option for these sorts of payloads.

    CJSF
    Exactly. Mars is sort of the worst case scenario: enough atmosphere that you have all the problems of reentry through an atmosphere, but not thick enough to get sufficient braking with a parachute.
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    NASA’s Mars 2020 rover is on track for a landing next month that will begin in earnest an effort to return samples of the planet to Earth. The spacecraft, launched July 30, is scheduled to land in Jezero Crater at 3:55 p.m. Eastern Feb. 18.

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-prepares-...-2020-landing/
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  20. #80
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    Landing the Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover. NASA’s newest rover has an autopilot called Terrain-Relative Navigation.

    https://scitechdaily.com/a-neil-arms...verance-rover/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    "NASA's Perseverance pays off back home"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/NA..._home_999.html

    A laser-light sensor that can identify bacteria in a wound may sound far-fetched, but it's already becoming a reality, thanks in part to NASA's Mars Exploration Program. The technology is going to Mars for the first time on Perseverance, which will touch down on the Red Planet in February, but it's already detecting trace contaminants in pharmaceutical manufacturing, wastewater treatment, and other important operations on Earth.

    That's not the only technology headed to Mars that's already paying dividends on the ground. Here on Earth, these innovations are also improving circuit board manufacturing and even led to a special drill bit design for geologists.
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  22. #82
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    On Feb. 18, the Mars rover Perseverance will attempt a daring skycrane landing similar to one aced by its predecessor Curiosity August 2012, and an epic NASA video shows exactly how it'll be done.
    6 days left!

  23. #83
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    "Sensors prepare to collect data as Perseverance enters Martian atmosphere"

    https://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Se...phere_999.html

    Nearly six-and-a-half months and 300 million miles since launch, NASA's Perseverance rover will land on Mars Feb. 18, 2021, to begin its robotic exploration of the Red Planet. But before Perseverance touches down on the surface of Mars, it has to achieve a successful entry, descent, and landing (EDL).

    Onboard the rover's protective aeroshell is the Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation 2 (MEDLI2), which will collect critical data about the harsh entry environment during Perseverance's entry through the planet's atmosphere. While not used as part of the Mars 2020 controls for this Mars landing, the MEDLI2 data will help improve the designs of entry systems for future robotic and crewed Mars missions.

    MEDLI2 includes three types of sensors - thermocouples, heat flux sensors, and pressure transducers - that will measure extreme heat and pressure during entry. It also contains electronics and hardware for recording the thermal and pressure loads experienced during entry and through the parachute deployment. In total, 28 sensors are arranged in a unique pattern across the heat shield and back shell of the Mars 2020 entry vehicle.
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  24. #84
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    Mods/Admins: can we add "Perseverance" to the thread title?

    CJSF
    "I like the stories
    About angels, unicorns and elves
    Now I like those stories
    As much as anybody else
    But when I'm seeking knowledge
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    The facts are with science"

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  25. #85
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    Here we go... NASA’s Mars Perseverance Rover Is About to Land on the Red Planet – What to Expect (timetable of events)

    https://scitechdaily.com/nasas-mars-...hat-to-expect/
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  26. #86
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    The way you wrote that, I was afraid it was today, but it is tomorrow, about 12:55pm PST. I am making a point of not checking on it until after landing. If it would happen to lithobrake (or in this case, “lithobreak” would work just as well) I want to hear about it in a quick statement and not go through that period where you aren’t quite sure.

    Hoping for the best, but still concerned . . . It is supposed to be quite an improvement over Curiosity, both due to experience with Curiosity and new technology, even if it is a very similar machine, and I want to see what it comes up with.

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  27. #87
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    Life as we do not know it: Astrobiology and the Mars 2020 mission

    https://phys.org/news/2021-02-life-a...s-mission.html
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  28. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    The way you wrote that, I was afraid it was today, but it is tomorrow, about 12:55pm PST. I am making a point of not checking on it until after landing. If it would happen to lithobrake (or in this case, “lithobreak” would work just as well) I want to hear about it in a quick statement and not go through that period where you aren’t quite sure.

    Hoping for the best, but still concerned . . . It is supposed to be quite an improvement over Curiosity, both due to experience with Curiosity and new technology, even if it is a very similar machine, and I want to see what it comes up with.
    Stuff that bugs me: People who mix up "break" and "brake"!

    Sure hope all goes well, but like you I don't want to sit through the seven minutes of terror.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post

    Sure hope all goes well, but like you I don't want to sit through the seven minutes of terror.
    I sat through the 7 minutes of terror for Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity. I plan on watching for Perseverance.

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    I don't know if it was intentional, but lithobreak does work too, though.

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