Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 121 to 150 of 150

Thread: Another space race?

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    A 10 minute video by CBC on "China's race to the moon — their new lander is a small step towards a great leap"

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/dec-...leap-1.4940936

    The China National Space Administration has said that its long term goal is a series of manned lunar surface missions beginning around 2030. This means China could return humans to the Moon before NASA. But before that happens, China may win another 'race'.

    Part of Chang'e-4's mission is to prepare the way for Chang'e-5, which is scheduled to bring back samples from the far side of the Moon next year. That mission will be a test to see if it is possible to bring back the first-ever samples from Mars, perhaps around 2028 .
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    311
    Hi Selvaarchi,

    I'm Canadian and I love the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corp.). Regardless, this audio (not video) is mostly a nonsense interview of a guy who wants to sell books about China's space effort.

    YMMV

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    Yet another article on the US - China. "race to the moon". This time the author claims, China might do it with 2 modified Long March 5s by 2025.

    https://www.theepochtimes.com/china-...n_2741783.html

    President Donald Trump signed a policy directive on Dec. 11, 2017, committing the United States to a return to the moon. A year later, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that China is reconfiguring its manned space program in order to “beat” the United States back to the lunar surface.

    For a brief period in the late 1950s, both the United States and the former Soviet Union considered building military bases on the moon. The United States abandoned that idea quickly, while the Soviets continued to invest in moon-base technologies until the collapse of the union. China, however, in the late 1980s, put the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) in charge of its revived manned space program, which has consistently produced “dual use” benefits for the PLA.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    An article in Bloomberg Opinion on"No, China Isn’t Winning the Space Race". With some justification, the argument is based on the USA commercial sector and the huge lead NASA has on scientific space exploration.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/ar...the-space-race

    On Wednesday, China successfully landed its Chang’e-4 spacecraft on the moon’s far side — an impressive technological accomplishment that speaks to China’s emergence as a major space power. Understandably, some Chinese scientists are taking a victory lap, with one going so far as to gloat to the New York Times that “We Chinese people have done something that the Americans have not dared try.”

    That cockiness speaks to the spirit of great-power competition animating the Chinese space program. China is open about the fact that it isn’t merely looking to expand human knowledge and boundaries; it’s hoping to supplant the U.S. as the 21st century’s dominant space power. And, if this were still the 1960s, when the American and Soviet space agencies fiercely competed against one another, China’s deep pockets, focus and methodical approach to conquering the heavens might indeed win the day. But the truth is, thanks to the development of a dynamic, fast-moving American commercial space industry, China’s almost certain to be a runner-up for decades to come.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "USA Defense intelligence report: China in steady pursuit of space capabilities to outmatch U.S."

    https://spacenews.com/defense-intell...-outmatch-u-s/

    An unclassified report released Jan. 15 by the Defense Intelligence Agency does not reveal anything new about China’s advances in space technologies and capabilities. But it does highlight one major concern for the Pentagon: China’s military is becoming increasingly adept at militarizing commercial space technologies.

    The People’s Republic of China is conducting “sophisticated satellite operations and probably is testing on-orbit dual-use technologies that could be applied to counterspace missions,” said the DIA in its first unclassified report made public on China’s military power.

    China’s space advances in support of civil, economic and political goals could provide the nation a significant edge in military operations, the DIA said. Chinese military strategists regard the ability to use space-based systems and deny them to adversaries as central to enabling modern warfare. “As a result, the People’s Republic of China continues to strengthen its military space capabilities despite its public stance against the militarization of space,” said the report.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "There is no space race". As the title of the article suggest's, the Author argues, there is no race.

    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3645/1

    The landing of Chang’e-4 on the far side of the Moon is a triumph for Chinese space exploration, reflecting technological sophistication in launching a communications satellite to orbit the Moon so that Chang’e-4 could communicate back to Earth. China provided the location of its spacecraft to NASA so that its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter could produce images of exact location where the lunar lander and its rover landed. That exchange, while no big deal technically, was symbolic of the reality that many are unwilling to accept for different reasons: there is no space race.

    In the 1950s, after the launch of the first two Sputniks, the United States and the Soviet Union embarked on the great space race with its multiple firsts that culminated in the Apollo program and the Eagle landing on the lunar surface in July 1969. That success did not signal a continuation of the space race but rather its winding down to the point that, by the mid-1970s, the United States was out of space with regards to human space exploration until the Space Shuttle first flew in 1981.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    Chang'e-4 landing on the moon, is not a sign of another space race.

    https://www.insidesources.com/point-...inese-company/

    On January 3, 2019, China became the first nation to make a soft landing of a spacecraft on the far side of the Moon. The subsequent video footage of the Chang’e 4 rover making its way around this unexplored terrain, along with the images of their first-of-its-kind plant experiments, have hearkened us to another era, when NASA’s Apollo astronauts planted the American flag on the Moon and returned home with new science, data and perspective on the world and universe that we all share.

    The Apollo missions, however, were set against the backdrop of the Cold War, when space exploration was a proxy for the U.S.-Soviet fight for world leadership. Since the Chang’e 4 landing, part of the ensuing media coverage has spurred new debate about whether a new space race with China is beginning. There are certainly groups in both countries who would like nothing better than to have an old-fashioned geopolitical race between two global powers. But that is a race for a different era and it’s not the one unfolding before us today.

    For as strategic as higher ground may be, the forces racing to the Moon are no longer just government assets. Today’s space race is being waged by entrepreneurs and commercial innovators, and this new and inspiring competition is bringing technological revolution faster to space exploration and the commercial marketplace than anything imagined or produced by the Apollo era.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    The European Institute Policy Institute (ESPI) Executive Brief 28 look's at the European position between the US and china paths in Space exploration. Can Europe be a enabler between the two parties?

    https://espi.or.at/news/espi-executi...oon-and-europe

    Irrespective of their specific configuration and implementation timeframes, Chinese lunar plans, together
    with the position of the United States on a renewed American leadership in space, raise a number of
    questions for the international space community and, more importantly, open the way for a new era of
    space exploration structured around a mix of cooperation and competition.
    While China has often reiterated its interest in cooperation, it has also proved very eager to translate the
    techno-nationalist benefits stemming from its robotic and human space programmes into geopolitical
    influence. Because of this, none of the major space players has, so far, engaged in an extensive
    cooperation with China. Quite to the contrary, suspicions on all sides have also been stimulating the
    emergence of competitive dynamics, particularly in the United States.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    809
    The best thing Europe could do is help pressure China on their institutional and soverign intellectual property theft. That settled we could repeal the Wolf Amendment which restricts cooperation with them in space.

    With things as they are China will have a MIR level station, the US will have a rocket to nowhere, and Musk & Bezos will be waving "bye!" at both as they head off to where ever.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "As China Surges Ahead in Space, India and Japan Band Together to Keep Up"

    https://thewire.in/space/as-china-su...her-to-keep-up

    Though both Japan and India have pursued national space missions, they have not matched up to China’s space capabilities, funded by its deep pockets and Xi Jinping’s strategic vision and leadership.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    Although the US commercial companies have a huge lead in the commercial space race, the Chinese commercial space companies have made huge strides in the last 3 years. See a 4 minute video on the subject by CNBC.

    https://www.cnbc.com/video/2019/02/1...pace-race.html

    Elon Musk's SpaceX and Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin have long dominated the news with their respective advances in private space travel industry. But two private Chinese companies are also making big moves and gaining billions in investments as China's state space agency announces its own ambitious goals. Here's what's going on in the global space race.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    A very good summary of China's space capabilities and future direction by the "U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC and SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION"

    https://www.uscc.gov/Research/china%...-united-states

    Summary:
    China seeks to become an international leader in space, or what it terms a “space power in all respects.” In this role, Beijing aspires to lead international space-related innovation and exploration and establish an advanced system of infrastructure to serve its space sector. China has suffered some setbacks on projects crucial for the progression of program milestones, such as its heavy-lift launch vehicle program, and still lags behind the United States in its human spaceflight and space station program. Nevertheless, China’s space program is a source of national pride, and its consistent high level of political support and funding ensures progress toward establishing itself as a space power. In 2003, China joined the United States and Russia as a member of the exclusive group of countries to have conducted human spaceflight, and since then it has nearly completed a new, rival global navigation satellite system (GNSS)—set for completion in 2020—and demonstrated its willingness to undertake high-risk, high-reward missions, as reflected by its historic landing on the moon’s far side in 2019. China is likely to achieve future milestones in areas where it is lagging behind international standards on shorter timetables than when the United States accomplished similar missions. This report examines China’s space goals and national space strategy; its progress toward those goals, including an examination of China’s progress in its advanced launch vehicle, long-term crewed space station, and lunar exploration programs; and the primary entities involved in setting and implementing its space policy. Finally, the report assesses the implications of China’s space program for the United States and its continued leadership in space.
    Link to the pdf for the report.

    https://www.uscc.gov/sites/default/f...er%20Goals.pdf

    Executive Summary
     China seeks to become a peer in technology and status of the United States in space. Although China still lags
    behind the United States in some areas, given the fact that in at least one key area it is likely to accomplish in
    20 years what took the United States 40 years to complete, it will likely achieve other important milestones
    more quickly than the United States did in the past.
     China’s successful deployment of a lander to the moon’s far side, the first in history, clearly demonstrates
    Beijing’s ability and desire to achieve increasingly sophisticated milestones in space. It is likely a Chinese
    crewed lunar mission will launch by the mid-2030s.
     China’s deliberate and comprehensive approach to its space program, backed by high levels of funding and
    political support, has allowed it to attain domestic legitimacy and international prestige. China will probably
    launch, assemble, and operate a long-term space station before 2025 and has invited international partners to
    participate in its use.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "Shanahan, Wilson, Goldfein offer views for ensuring U.S. superiority in space"

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Sh...space_999.html

    The top echelon of the United States' civilian and military leadership offered unflinching assurances April 9, that America's superiority in space will endure even as competition - and the stakes - for primacy intensify.

    In remarks to more than 1,500 government, military, industry and international leaders at the 35th Space Symposium, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan set a tone on at least one dominant point that was followed in quick succession in speeches by Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein.

    "The threat is clear," Shanahan said. "We're in an era of great power competition, and the next major conflict may be won or lost in space."
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,199
    New article suggesting there could be many "space races" underway. The satellite internet competition could be a "bloodbath".

    https://phys.org/news/2019-05-space-...net-world.html

    New space race to bring satellite internet to the world

    by Ivan Couronne 5/8/2019

    Anxiety has set in across the space industry ever since the world's richest man, Jeff Bezos, revealed Project Kuiper: a plan to put 3,236 satellites in orbit to provide high-speed internet across the globe.

    Offering broadband internet coverage to digital deserts is also the goal of the company OneWeb, which is set to start building two satellites a day this summer in Florida, for a constellation of over 600 expected to be operational by 2021.

    Billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX is equally active: it's just received a clearance to put 12,000 satellites in orbit at various altitudes in the Starlink constellation. Not to mention other projects in the pipeline that have less funding or are not yet as defined.

    Is there even enough space for three, four, five or more space-based internet providers?

  15. #135
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,199
    in fact, now that I think of it, you could say there are space races for the following goals.

    1. Satellite telecommunications, including internet
    2. Mars robotic exploration and ultimately human colonization
    3. Moon human/robot exploration and human colonization, renewed crewed lunar landings
    4. Satellite launching services, for small, medium, and large payloads, including suborbital flights
    5. Asteroid exploration and mining, and asteroid deflection

    Any other space races going on now?

  16. #136
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    311
    Hello Roger,

    Some comments and additions:

    1. Satellite telecommunications, including internet
    I suspect this will be big.
    2. Mars robotic exploration and ultimately human colonization
    I'm not so sure about colonization but I am also confident Mars exploration will grow.
    3. Moon human/robot exploration and human colonization, renewed crewed lunar landings
    I don't see the use of colonization. But the moon seems to already be a competitive focus for USA.
    4. Satellite launching services, for small, medium, and large payloads, including suborbital flights
    Yup, competition will likely increase.
    5. Asteroid exploration and mining, and asteroid deflection
    This will surely become very important and competitive. It's taking way longer than I had been hoping years ago. But I think it will happen and accelerate all space races.

    I add the following:
    6. Space Tourism.
    I think competition in this area will drive human space travel costs down. It will also drive development of rotationally generated artificial gravity. While USA is currently in the lead, I guess that within a few decades most space powers will be offering such services.
    7. Intercontinental Travel. I don't know if SpacedX will do it soon or first. But it will happen and be big
    8. Space Astronomy.
    Growth here is way slower than I had hoped for. But the potential is immense.

    Cheers

  17. #137
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,199
    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    I add the following:
    6. Space Tourism.
    I think competition in this area will drive human space travel costs down. It will also drive development of rotationally generated artificial gravity. While USA is currently in the lead, I guess that within a few decades most space powers will be offering such services.
    7. Intercontinental Travel. I don't know if SpacedX will do it soon or first. But it will happen and be big
    8. Space Astronomy.
    Growth here is way slower than I had hoped for. But the potential is immense.
    Space tourism will be risky, but people still go to the Grand Canyon no matter how many of them fall into it, so, yeah. Space tourism. Not sure rocket travel will supplant jets, but it's possible.

  18. #138
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,518
    I'm not convinced about rocket intercontinental travel. It will remain vastly more expensive than aircraft in the forseeable future, and the need to "be there asap" goes down as remote meeting technologies improve. Twofold: not only do you often not need to go somewhere because you can meet online; travel time is also less lost time than before because you can keep working for most of your travel time.

    If something like Skylon gives Mach 5-8 flights at almost aircraft costs, perhaps. But even a Starship with 100 people inside would make Concorde seem cheap.

  19. #139
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    311
    Hello Nicolas,

    100 years ago, our current airline industry was unimaginable to most.

    I was participating in remote meetings over 30 years ago. This technology has had little impact on the (perceived?) need for people to travel for business.

    cheers

  20. #140
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,518
    I think it was very possible to imagine the market for fast global transport 100 years ago: moving across the ocean took 2 to 3 weeks; doing it in 7 hours at reasonable cost would be anyone's dream. That's why they were constantly designing faster ships, developing airships, increasing aircraft capabilities. Opening up this very market was the whole idea behind the Daily Mail transatlantic price (more than 100 years ago already), much like the Ansari X-prizes were recently.

    The desire for companies and individuals to be carbon neutral or things like remote surgery were also unimaginable to most but are a reality now. In my line of industry, I see a very clear decrease in the need of ASAP in-situ interventions on distant locations, as many problems now can be solved remotely. This will only increase with the availability of digital twin copies of installations, AR/VR and other means of remote assistance. I think there will be more need for a high speed transport of critical goods rather than people. If only the stuff doesn't get stuck in customs for 3 weeks after landing, of course. In other applications, I have for example never ever seen my insurance agent in person. I have seen my banker in person twice in my life. An international exam we organise is now fully digital with assistants helping remotely. Where my simulator supplier used to do all repairs in-situ 10 years ago, now that is limited to repairs involving hardware while everything else is done remotely. With the huge shift from work-at-the-office to time & place independent work of the last few years, people are also getting more and more accustomed to some or all of the people attending a meeting remotely. there will always be some demand for sending some people fast all over the place where cost and environmental impact are of secondary importance, but with these things you must be careful not to develop a solution for the problem that no longer exists. Just like there is no current market for a solution to send huge amounts of paper letters fast across the globe; the vast majority of that market is now eaten up by email.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2019-May-10 at 08:27 AM.

  21. #141
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,518
    I must add that I have worked on fast intercontinental craft professionally. But those were (partially) air-breathing solutions that bring the cost and impact close to today's aircraft, unlike rockets. Here too I think that once we master SCRAMjet engines, rockets for intercontinental human transport will have little use. I see rockets as excellent things for taking stuff into space and travel in space, but earth-to-earth human transport I see more future in SCRAMjets, possibly with a combined rocket cycle.

  22. #142
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    The company I worked for 25 years ago already had secure video conference facilities in different locations. I was hoping that by now we would have developed holograms where we can actually visualise the persons feelings and expressions at a conference call. I guess we will have to wait for 5G for that. (anyone seen the demo of a fire breathing dragon in a baseball field by South Korea)
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  23. #143
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,551
    The wings are the forelimbs so it is a true Wyvern https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5hQpRbHERg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8QfC18echQ

    The animation still looks a bit....Stark. Ahem

  24. #144
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    36,941
    Quote Originally Posted by 7cscb View Post
    6. Space Tourism.
    I think competition in this area will drive human space travel costs down. It will also drive development of rotationally generated artificial gravity. While USA is currently in the lead, I guess that within a few decades most space powers will be offering such services.

    Hasn't Russia hosted several "space tourists"?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #145
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "50 years after US moon landing, China is catching up in the space race". The article concludes with "Curcio said that in his estimation, the Chinese space program was perhaps now only 10 to 15 years behind the US's in terms of technology."

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/19/a...hnk/index.html

    Fifty years ago, when the Apollo 11 astronauts became the first human beings to land on the moon, the Chinese space program had yet to launch a single satellite.

    The fierce space race between the United States and the Soviet Union had left behind Beijing, which launched its first manned space flight in 2003, more than 40 years after NASA's achievement.
    But in recent decades, as China has grown richer and more powerful, its space program has accelerated.
    Buoyed by billions of dollars in government investment, Beijing has fired space labs and satellites into orbit and even become the first country to send an unmanned rover to the far side of the moon.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  26. #146
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    First we had CNN with the above article (post #145) and now Washington Post with " Another front in the tensions between the U.S. and China: Space"

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/techn...=.dd507d892d54

    Fifty years after the United States proved its dominance of space by beating the Soviet Union to landing humans on the moon, the country is confronting the cosmic ambitions of another superpower: China.

    China didn’t launch an astronaut into space until 2003 — more than 40 years after the United States and the Soviet Union did. It has since developed its space program at a torrid pace, even as the United States has become dependent on Russia to maintain a presence on the International Space Station.

    NASA hasn’t sent another soul to the lunar surface since 1972. But earlier this year, China made history when it became the first nation to land an uncrewed spacecraft on the far side of the moon, a feat it hailed as opening “a new chapter in humanity’s exploration of the moon.”

    NASA and its contractors are still struggling to build a spacecraft capable of flying astronauts to space, eight years after the last space shuttle landed at the Kennedy Space Center. Meanwhile, China has developed a monster rocket and last year launched more rockets than any other country on Earth, though none with people on board.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  27. #147
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    Yet another article on the space race but this time it is a Solar Space Race.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/06/16...ar-space-race/

    Every disaster movie starts with the president ignoring a scientist. But humanity’s survival isn’t a movie. If any U.S. president in the last five decades had had the foresight to take space-based solar power technology seriously, the incoming man-made climate disaster could already have been averted with a clean, constant, and limitless power source that costs less than burning fossil fuels—and the United States could be leading the field

    Today, if reports are accurate, China is at the forefront of the technology, which is basically solar power as you know it, except on steroids: It can collect energy 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. And instead of taking up millions of acres of land on the ground, space solar farms would be located in geosynchronous orbit, about 22,000 miles above sea level—far above pesky things like clouds, rain, and the cycle of day and night that make peak terrestrial solar power so intermittent. China plans on putting a commercial-scale solar power station in orbit by 2050, an accomplishment that would give it bragging rights as the first nation to harness the sun’s energy in space and beam power down to Earth.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  28. #148
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "The space race is now, and America can’t afford delays" by Frank LoBiondo who served on the House Armed Services Committee, was a senior member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He served 12 terms before retiring in January 2019. He is the CEO of LoBo Strategies LLC and currently an adviser to United Launch Alliance.

    https://www.defensenews.com/opinion/...afford-delays/

    For the past few years the national security discussion rightly looked beyond our atmosphere to the next battleground. The latest threat assessment by the U.S. Department of Defense should dispel any myth that there is no space race. There is, and the U.S. is far behind.

    The proliferation of laser and cyber weapons as well as counter-space technology by our adversaries is deeply troubling. Fortunately, we are on the precipice of action to further U.S. space interests, unless that effort gets bogged down by personal agendas.

    As a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee for more than a decade, I received countless briefings from military and intelligence officials solely focused on the upcoming international struggle for space. China and Russia have long set their goals above us — literally — and new players such as India are looking to expand their reach.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  29. #149
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    809
    Looks like the US DoD can leverage the megaconstellation satellites.

    This would be along the lines of DARPA's Blackjack program, which would use megaconstellation satellite buses for DoD payloads; wolves among the sheep.

    https://www.al.com/news/huntsville/2...e-defense.html

    Top general says SpaceX may have just changed space defense

    A top American general told a defense conference in Alabama today that Elon Musk’s SpaceX may have just “completely changed our ability” to sense threats against America using satellite clusters in space.

    “Holy smokes. Talk about being able to move the ball,” Air Force Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy said of the May 23 launch by Space X of 60 small satellites at one time.

    “The space sensing layer is absolutely key,” O’Shaughnessy said of the challenge of defending the country and its forces against new weapons such as “hypersonic” missiles. “I don’t know how you can do it without the space sensing layer… taking advantage of what (low-Earth orbit) gives you.”
    >
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2019-Aug-08 at 08:02 PM.

  30. #150
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,474
    "Newt Gingrich: We’re in a space race with China – We must win to protect our economic and national security"

    https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/newt...uture-of-space

    As the 2020 election campaign heats up, our trade conflict with China evolves, and we all become absorbed in other world events, it’s important that we do not lose track of a critical opportunity America has now to continue to lead the future of space travel.

    Frankly, we are potentially at a turning point that could determine the future of our country – and all humankind. This is the topic of this weeks’ episode of my “Newt’s World” podcast.


    As our legacy space companies and NASA continue to fumble around and protect their prized projects, China is aggressively seeking to overcome the United States as the dominant space- faring nation.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •