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Thread: Middle-aged kit building

  1. #601
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    ... Some creative clamping is involved...
    The clothes pins are from a daughter's childhood stuff left in my house. They're 1" (2.54 cm) long.

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  2. #602
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    Sewing feet would make for great landing gear—perhaps model fifth wheels for landing pad feet.

  3. #603
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    New horse riders, 1/76 scale




    Single piece prints, the undercut you can get with a resin printer is brilliant.
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  4. #604
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    New horse riders, 1/76 scale




    Single piece prints, the undercut you can get with a resin printer is brilliant.
    That is very nice. What model of resin printer?
    Solfe

  5. #605
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    Continuing work on the La Pinta. I'm gluing an outer sheath of sapelly battens to the hull using contact cement, which is more tedious than the basswood hull planks. The sapelly is brittle and doesn't bend well. Moreover, the contact cement is very unforgiving in terms of getting the initial placement right, and unlike the CA glue I used for the basswood, it emits noxious fumes so I have to work in the garage or outside. It's freezing outside right now and pretty cold in the garage, requiring that I run space heaters for a while before working. Slowly getting done ...

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  6. #606
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    Oh, that's lovely work. Applause.

    Someone on my modelling forum has just gently told me that I have painted the Bristol Mercury XX engine of my Lysander aircraft completely wrong. And they're right. Sigh.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #607
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Continuing work on the La Pinta. I'm gluing an outer sheath of sapelly battens to the hull using contact cement, which is more tedious than the basswood hull planks. The sapelly is brittle and doesn't bend well. Moreover, the contact cement is very unforgiving in terms of getting the initial placement right, and unlike the CA glue I used for the basswood, it emits noxious fumes so I have to work in the garage or outside. It's freezing outside right now and pretty cold in the garage, requiring that I run space heaters for a while before working. Slowly getting done ...

    Noxious fumes. I used to work with rubber cement and it's thinner for art projects, so I can sympathize.

  8. #608
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Oh, that's lovely work. Applause.

    Someone on my modelling forum has just gently told me that I have painted the Bristol Mercury XX engine of my Lysander aircraft completely wrong. And they're right. Sigh.

    Grant Hutchison
    Thank you.

    And indeed, sigh. Been there.

  9. #609
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    Estes looks to sell a largely pre-built SLS replica 002206

  10. #610
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Continuing work on the La Pinta. I'm gluing an outer sheath of sapelly battens to the hull using contact cement, which is more tedious than the basswood hull planks. The sapelly is brittle and doesn't bend well. Moreover, the contact cement is very unforgiving in terms of getting the initial placement right, and unlike the CA glue I used for the basswood, it emits noxious fumes so I have to work in the garage or outside. It's freezing outside right now and pretty cold in the garage, requiring that I run space heaters for a while before working. Slowly getting done ...
    Very nice!

    A friend left a book with me all about cedar strip canoe making, with many different templates. I've been thinking about doing a ~1:12 model of one, but the thought of gluing all those tiny strips is making me think very carefully about starting... I may have to come back here for inspiration.

  11. #611
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Very nice!

    A friend left a book with me all about cedar strip canoe making, with many different templates. I've been thinking about doing a ~1:12 model of one, but the thought of gluing all those tiny strips is making me think very carefully about starting... I may have to come back here for inspiration.
    Thanks! Interesting you mention canoe making. A long time ago I got it into my head to build a telescope tube using canoe-making technique. That was an experience in killing brain cells what with the fiberglass outer layer. Still have the tube (but not the brain cells!). I was going to build a Dobsonian but never did. I suppose I still could.

  12. #612
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    The batten hull sheathing is finished on La Pinta with decent results. As noted before, the sappely wood is brittle but also the slats provided varied a bit in thickness, so the hull is not as smooth as I'd like even with vigorous sanding. Next up is to glue the stem, keel and sternpost to the hull frame members. These three are thick, pre-cut pieces that should fit the curve of the hull bottom precisely. Except, they don't. With the curved stem piece in place matched exactly to the curve of the hull, the keel piece is not long enough to extend aft to entirely mate up with the sternpost. There's gap of about a cm. Additionally, the sternpost is too long and the keel inexplicably thins towards aft. I can cut the sternpost down and the keel thickness isn't a show-stopper. But for the too-short keel, I think I will have to fashion a small piece to fill the gap.

    My opinion of the quality with Artesania Latina wooden ship models is waning a bit. There's obviously a lot of wood shaping involved with such models but I'm disappointed that the precision cut pieces aren't, well, terribly precise. And the instructions are not only lacking but not necessarily presented in the proper order. The stem, keep and sternpost should have been attached prior to the sappely battens being glued down, for instance. Still, it's a fun project and I'm not too concerned about minor defects in appearance. I imagine the real La Pinta had them as well.

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  13. #613
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    I started on my first plastic model in a long. I picked a good one, Bandai's Snowspeeder and AT-ST in 1:144 scale. They have good detail, but low requirements for skill.

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    You'd think the parts would be very tiny, but as you can see with the first image, they look "beefy" (image 1). The piece come off the sprue easily and hardly require any clean up. In image two, I left the clippers in view for a sense of scale. That black strip is a piece of sandpaper I used for cleanup. The parts are too small for a file. Each part has pegs in the middle so you don't end up with glue blobs on the edges. There are seams visible, but there are more parts to cover them.

    I hope to finish construction today and start painting tomorrow.
    Solfe

  14. #614
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    I have sausage fingers and needed a hemostat to assemble this thing. It looks great, but I should have painted it before I started assembly. It's loaded with tiny details that will be very hard to hit with a brush.

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    There is a very simple step by step build breakdown on my websites.
    Solfe

  15. #615
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    Amazing detail for the size.

  16. #616
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    The Snowspeeder has a lot of detail, too. It was a fun build. Now for paint.

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    I have a close to complete step by step guide on my site. What I really need is a nice template to do step by step guides. It's that or painting tomorrow.
    Solfe

  17. #617
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    More progress on La Pinta. The instructions continue to vex. They call for attaching the rudder hinges using small nails and pre-drilling 1.0 mm holes. Except the nails are too long and they are considerably thinner than 1.0 mm. Along with drilling smaller holes (~0.7 mm), I decided to snip off the nail heads and glue them to the hinge with just a short length going into the hole. Thus, they don't provide much structural strength - I glued the hinges to the wood to help out with that.

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  18. #618
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    Solfe, I'm impressed by the detail on those small parts. I just looked at some model airplanes my son made 15 or more years ago and see how much the quality (detail) varies between them.

    Geonuc, maybe the instructions and parts are just guidelines... The hull looks really good to me.

  19. #619
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    I seem to remember the da Vinci robot folding up a tiny paper airplane. Now to have it build a 1 centimeter Cygnus from The Black Hole.

  20. #620
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Geonuc, maybe the instructions and parts are just guidelines... The hull looks really good to me.
    Thanks. The instructions are certainly turning out to be guidelines, despite their specificity. I mostly wish some of the supplied parts weren't sized incorrectly. The latest issue is two rubbing strakes that are shorter than the length of the hull they're meant to span. I'll have to fashion extensions from scrap pieces.

    I complain a lot but I'm enjoying the build. It's a good project, especially in these times.

  21. #621
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    These are kind of fun:
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    Three 1:144 scale Discovery pods from 2001: A Space Odyssey. A very nice bit of 3D printing. They ship with the various arm options moulded inside the pod (left). You snip the attachments and ease them out (centre), and then attach the arms and the base (right, with a coat of primer). There are four 1mm channels that take (after some experiment) 0.75mm fibreoptic for the headlights, with room for a small LED inside the pod to light them up.

    Grabt Hutchison

  22. #622
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    These are kind of fun:
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    Three 1:144 scale Discovery pods from 2001: A Space Odyssey. A very nice bit of 3D printing. They ship with the various arm options moulded inside the pod (left). You snip the attachments and ease them out (centre), and then attach the arms and the base (right, with a coat of primer). There are four 1mm channels that take (after some experiment) 0.75mm fibreoptic for the headlights, with room for a small LED inside the pod to light them up.

    Grant Hutchison
    Those look great. The detail is very good, 3D printing has come a long ways.
    Solfe

  23. #623
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Those look great. The detail is very good, 3D printing has come a long ways.
    There's a little bit of a staircase effect in the lower parts of the model--because the plastic is translucent and cloudy, I needed to prime it to be able to see it. Now I know it's there I should be able to sand it down a bit in the other two.
    I only need two of these--one lighted and one prop--so the one at right is my sacrifical test object. I slightly damage it while trying to clear the fibreoptic channels so I could feed 1mm fibre (which is what the instructions specify). Experiment suggests 0.75mm is less traumatic, and I can melt the outer ends to produce neat little lenses that cover the channel openings entirely.

    Grant Hutchison

  24. #624
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    These are kind of fun:
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    Three 1:144 scale Discovery pods from 2001: A Space Odyssey. A very nice bit of 3D printing. They ship with the various arm options moulded inside the pod (left). You snip the attachments and ease them out (centre), and then attach the arms and the base (right, with a coat of primer). There are four 1mm channels that take (after some experiment) 0.75mm fibreoptic for the headlights, with room for a small LED inside the pod to light them up.

    Grabt Hutchison
    Very cool! Captain Swoop has actually set up a business doing 3-D printing for modelers, mostly for model railroaders I think.

    The one on the left looks a bit Vaderish.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #625
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Estes looks to sell a largely pre-built SLS replica 002206
    I have an empty spot on my display plank. I guess that too counts as an SLS replica...
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #626
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    This is a 1/48 Westland Lysander, in the all-black livery of the RAF Special Duties squadrons. These aircraft flew French Resistance fighters and SOE agents in and out of occupied France by moonlight. The particular aircraft modelled here was forced down by severe icing conditions in a field in northern France in the early hours of 29 January 1942. It had so little fuel left on board that the pilot, Squadron Leader John Nesbitt-Dufort, was unable to set it on fire. The Germans subsequently managed to destroy it quite effectively, however--while towing it away, they managed to tow it on to a level crossing just as a train was passing.
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    Grant Hutchison

  27. #627
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    This is a 1/48 Westland Lysander, in the all-black livery of the RAF Special Duties squadrons. These aircraft flew French Resistance fighters and SOE agents in and out of occupied France by moonlight. The particular aircraft modelled here was forced down by severe icing conditions in a field in northern France in the early hours of 29 January 1942. It had so little fuel left on board that the pilot, Squadron Leader John Nesbitt-Dufort, was unable to set it on fire. The Germans subsequently managed to destroy it quite effectively, however--while towing it away, they managed to tow it on to a level crossing just as a train was passing.
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    Grant Hutchison
    I had never heard of that event before. I wonder if the train was credited with a 'kill'?

  28. #628
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    This is a 1/48 Westland Lysander, in the all-black livery of the RAF Special Duties squadrons. These aircraft flew French Resistance fighters and SOE agents in and out of occupied France by moonlight. The particular aircraft modelled here was forced down by severe icing conditions in a field in northern France in the early hours of 29 January 1942. It had so little fuel left on board that the pilot, Squadron Leader John Nesbitt-Dufort, was unable to set it on fire. The Germans subsequently managed to destroy it quite effectively, however--while towing it away, they managed to tow it on to a level crossing just as a train was passing.
    That's somewhat hilarious, the bit about the train. Nice model.

  29. #629
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    That's somewhat hilarious, the bit about the train. Nice model.
    Thanks. It got more hilarious. Nesbitt-Dufort and his two passengers (French Resistance and SOE) fled the scene, burrowed into a hedge in the pouring rain, and opened Nesbitt-Dufort's survival kit. There they were, in the middle of Occupied France, with a wad of reichsmarks and a silk map of Germany.
    Nesbitt-Dufort's memoir, Black Lysander, is a good read.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #630
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    Progress on La Pinta. The hull is done, along with the decking and rails.

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