Page 23 of 23 FirstFirst ... 13212223
Results 661 to 674 of 674

Thread: Middle-aged kit building

  1. #661
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,482
    I hate to side-step the thread, but does anyone have or know of a good modeling website? I am looking at various websites to see how people post images about models for my website. Theme doesn't matter, it's more about how things are displayed.
    Solfe

  2. #662
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I hate to side-step the thread, but does anyone have or know of a good modeling website? I am looking at various websites to see how people post images about models for my website. Theme doesn't matter, it's more about how things are displayed.
    You'll find a wide variety of images, some very professional, some distinctly informal, at Britmodeller.
    For completed models, take a look at the various "Ready for inspection" sections; for build logs, "Work in Progress".

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #663
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,980
    Given my preferences, I sometimes check out Starship Modeler. Here is a link to their gallery search page:

    https://www.starshipmodeler.com/gallery/gallery.cfm

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  4. #664
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,482
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Given my preferences, I sometimes check out Starship Modeler. Here is a link to their gallery search page:

    https://www.starshipmodeler.com/gallery/gallery.cfm
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    You'll find a wide variety of images, some very professional, some distinctly informal, at Britmodeller.
    For completed models, take a look at the various "Ready for inspection" sections; for build logs, "Work in Progress".

    Grant Hutchison
    Oh, boy. This is going to be a time sink because I can see myself scanning through some terrific models while faking research on website design.

    Thank you both, these are perfect links. They are exactly what I was looking for. Maybe better than what I would looking for.
    Solfe

  5. #665
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,190
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Oh, boy. This is going to be a time sink because I can see myself scanning through some terrific models...
    Yep, I followed Grant's link and re-emerged an hour or so later. Haven't dared to click on Van Rijn's yet...

  6. #666
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,482
    I am way behind on my spring blog series on Star Wars Models. I managed to botch my first build, but can fake it with a good camera.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0856.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	354.3 KB 
ID:	26047

    This X-Wing is in 1:144 scale. These models by Bandai are marvelously well designed. They have the tiniest bits of plastic holding the parts to sprues, which makes super clean cuts when clipping them. One sweep from a file removes it all, if any plastic was actual left on the model.

    The models are amazing well thought out. Every part is keyed so there is zero chance of sticking identically purposed parts in the wrong place. I forgot about this fact as I started the model. I tried to dry fit some engine pieces before gluing, then realized I couldn't get them apart. This isn't a snap tight model, but it could be. I fought a horrible battle trying to remove the engine parts so I could dot them with a little glue. As I assembled the second engine I almost dry fitted them, too. But I caught myself with a mighty cry: "NOOO!"

    The kids came running. I guess that wasn't all in my head.

    The two parts that gave me the most trouble were the wing fittings. The wings are hinged on a central pin and I couldn't figure out how to snap those parts together. They required a large amount of force on very tiny parts. The best idea I had for this operation was using a pencil sharpener.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0853.JPG 
Views:	12 
Size:	462.2 KB 
ID:	26048 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0852.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	215.5 KB 
ID:	26049

    I think I'll remove the blade from the sharpener and add it to my tool kit.

    The second part that gave me trouble is I think I mounted the wing assembly upside down in the body. They just feel wrong, they are springy and put some stress on the body when moved. When I open the wings, the the upper left wing presses into the body instead of properly opening. I think the hinge pin fits into a piece on the back assembly and I must have missed the post hole. I'll have to pay more attention to the next one I'll build. Thanks to some jaunty angles with the photos, you can't see it.
    Solfe

  7. #667
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,152
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    I too bought mine for soldering work, not so much modeling. It isn't excellent for either application but there it is.
    My problem when using it for soldering is: if the clamp doesn't bite through the insulation of the wire straight away, it tends to do so when the insulation softens due to the soldering heat. I'd need a tool like this one but with a bigger foot and toothless jaws.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  8. #668
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,564
    These two aircraft are actually the same airframe at the beginning and end of its life:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LN-ABH-D260-2.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	491.3 KB 
ID:	26132
    It's a Junkers F.13W, construction number 650, which was part of the Junkers Spitsbergen Expedition of 1923, under the German registration D260. A lovely little passenger aircraft built from corrugated Duralumin, with an open cockpit--not ideal for a six-hour round trip to the edge of the Arctic pack ice.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D260-5.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	201.7 KB 
ID:	26133
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D260-3.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	296.1 KB 
ID:	26134

    After that adventure, it knocked around Germany, Estonia and Norway for a decade, under various registrations, before winding up in the hands of the famous Norwegian aviatrix Gidsken Jakobsen, who operated it for sight-seeing tours out of Balestrand on the Sognefjord with the Norwegian registration LN-ABH. By this time it had probably been fitted with a new engine--it certainly lost the characteristic "rhino horn" exhaust, which was replace with a bank of apparently home-made exhausts on the starboard side of the cowling. The rudder was also replaced with a home-grown fabric-and-frame version, the factory-fitted side step was replaced with a ladder on the port float, and it had somehow managed to lose all the aerodynamic fairings on the float struts. So quite a lot of revision needed to the kit parts.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LN-ABH-1.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	454.3 KB 
ID:	26135
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LN-ABH-4.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	218.9 KB 
ID:	26136
    I've depicted it as it took off on its final flight, when it lost its engine over Sognefjord in 1934. Literally, lost its engine--the engine shook itself loose and fell into the fjord. The pilot retrimmed the aircraft by persuading the front-seat passenger to crawl out on to the cowling, after which she managed to make a safe landing.

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #669
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,190
    Lovely work Grant.

    I wonder if that replacement rudder - larger than the original - was to provide more yaw authority due to the replacement engine being (possibly) more powerful, or just a general upgrade based on experience with the original design.

    I'm not familiar with the early history of metal monoplanes, but that one must have been near the pinnacle of available technology for such an expedition at the time.

    Aside... by contrast, there is a 1920 Curtiss Seagull at the Canadian Aviation Museum in Ottawa that was used in an aerial survey of the Parima River headwaters in Brazil. Whenever I visit that museum, I can admire that airplane for hours at a time. And last year I had the good fortune of seeing another variant of the design at a museum in New Zealand.

  10. #670
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bend, Oregon
    Posts
    6,381
    Very cool, Grant. I like how you've displayed them.

  11. #671
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,564
    Thanks, both.
    Various shapes and sizes of rudders evolved during this aircraft's production history, generally getting bigger as time went by, and the transition from an L2 to an L5 engine in the later production models certainly brought more power. I suspect the replumbed exhausts reflect the original L2 being replaced with an L5, but I haven't tracked down a record of that. So, yes, I'd agree that the large home-brewed rudder reflected a need for a larger control surface combined with difficulty in obtaining a part from Junkers.

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #672
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,152
    How did you make (or buy) the water, Grant? Looks very convincing from the photos.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  13. #673
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    How did you make (or buy) the water, Grant? Looks very convincing from the photos.
    Certainly beyond my skill level to reproduce that appearance. The display bases come from a UK company called Coastal Kits--over the years I've acquired several that match the sort of aircraft I'm interested in modelling, and use them for photographs.

    Grant Hutchison

  14. #674
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,750
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Thanks, both.
    Various shapes and sizes of rudders evolved during this aircraft's production history, generally getting bigger as time went by, and the transition from an L2 to an L5 engine in the later production models certainly brought more power. I suspect the replumbed exhausts reflect the original L2 being replaced with an L5, but I haven't tracked down a record of that. So, yes, I'd agree that the large home-brewed rudder reflected a need for a larger control surface combined with difficulty in obtaining a part from Junkers.

    Grant Hutchison
    I am loosely reminded of a plane I saw in an airshow in USA, an Antonov An2, Russian from, I think, 1946, and the largest single prop passenger plane. That was maybe ten years ago and still in use. Obviously a later but not so different concept.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •