Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 91 to 120 of 135

Thread: American human space capsule

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Practice, practice, PRACTICE!
    More than that. NASA wanted SpaceX to use 4 parachutes for Crew Dragon; in case of a land touchdown it'd be going slower. The more complex system revealed a problem; the asymmetry factor wasn't being properly modelled by the existing methods.

    NASA and SpaceX ran a long series of tests and modified the models, sharing this with the parachute industry. SpaceX then redesigned its parachutes to use Vectran in high load areas instead of nylon. These are Mark 3.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post

    NASA and SpaceX ran a long series of tests and modified the models, sharing this with the parachute industry.
    Engineering progress, nice.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,636
    Modelling is nice, but tossing it down 10 times and seeing the chutes properly open 10 times in a row is the proof that your model makes sense.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,269
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Modelling is nice, but tossing it down 10 times and seeing the chutes properly open 10 times in a row is the proof that your model makes sense.
    These words will be on the parade banners when my marching band wakes up the center of town. YES.

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    NASAs Dan Rasky talking about his experience as an embed during SpaceXs development of the PICA-X heat shield. Dan helped develop PICA, which PICA-X is based on.

    https://youtu.be/SMLDAgDNOhk

    More anecdotes in this SpaceNews story...

    https://spacenews.com/spacexs-high-v...at-shield-guy/

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068
    SpaceX in-flight abort test is now targeted for no earlier than Jan 18.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    @SpaceX
    Static fire of Falcon 9 complete – targeting January 18 for an in-flight demonstration of Crew Dragon’s launch escape system, which will verify the spacecraft’s ability to carry astronauts to safety in the unlikely event of an emergency during ascent

    https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1216022644614545409

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068
    Spaceflightnow.com says a 4-hour launch window will open at 8 AM on the 18th.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Yup

    Date: January 18
    Time; 0800-1200 Eastern

    https://youtu.be/qObBRM4euxk

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/spacex-...-demonstration

    SpaceX, NASA Gear up for In-Flight Abort Demonstration

    NASA and SpaceX are preparing to launch the final, major test before astronauts fly aboard the Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. The test, known as in-flight abort, will demonstrate the spacecraft’s escape capabilities - showing that the crew system can protect astronauts even in the unlikely event of an emergency during launch. The uncrewed flight test is targeted for 8 a.m. EST Saturday, Jan. 18, at the start of a four-hour test window, from Launch Complex 39A in Florida.

    SpaceX performed a full-duration static test Saturday, Jan. 11, of the Falcon 9 and completed a static fire of the Crew Dragon on Nov. 13, setting the stage for the critical flight test.

    Prior to launch, SpaceX and NASA teams will practice launch day end-to-end operations with NASA astronauts, including final spacecraft inspections and side hatch closeout. Additionally, SpaceX and NASA flight controllers along with support teams will be staged as they will for future Crew Dragon missions, helping the integrated launch team gain additional experience beyond existing simulations and training events.

    After liftoff, Falcon 9’s ascent will follow a trajectory that will mimic a Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station matching the physical environments the rocket and spacecraft will encounter during a normal ascent.

    For this test, SpaceX will configure Crew Dragon to intentionally trigger a launch escape prior to 1 min, 30 seconds into flight to demonstrate Crew Dragon's capability to safely separate from the Falcon 9 rocket in the unlikely event of an in-flight emergency. Once the launch escape sequence begins, Falcon 9's first stage Merlin engines will shut down and Crew Dragon’s SuperDraco thrusters will begin their firing sequence. The launch vehicle and spacecraft will separate, and Crew Dragon's SuperDracos will burn to completion.

    After Crew Dragon's SuperDracos shutdown, the spacecraft will passively coast to apogee, the highest point in its arc. Near apogee, Crew Dragon's trunk will separate and the smaller Draco thrusters will re-orient the spacecraft for reentry and parachute deploy. At the appropriate conditions, Dragon’s drogue and main parachutes will sequence to provide for a soft landing in the Atlantic Ocean near SpaceX Dragon recovery teams.

    Following Crew Dragon’s separation, Falcon 9 is expected to aerodynamically break up offshore over the Atlantic Ocean. Expected breakup time will vary based upon a number of factors, including day of launch winds and expected minor variations in vehicle attitudes and positions, but could occur shortly after separation or later upon reentry from the upper atmosphere. In either scenario, a dedicated team of SpaceX Falcon 9 recovery personnel will be staged and ready to begin recovering debris immediately after breakup.

    As part of the Dragon recovery operation, Air Force Detachment-3 personnel will work with the SpaceX recovery team to observe Crew Dragon and practice their initial approach to the spacecraft in the open ocean, mimicking an actual rescue operation before the SpaceX team recovers Crew Dragon for return to Cape Canaveral.

    SpaceX's uncrewed in-flight abort demonstration test of Crew Dragon's launch escape capabilities is designed to provide valuable data toward NASA certifying SpaceX's crew transportation system for carrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Crew Dragon In-Flight Abort rollout

    @spaceflightnow
    SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon capsule have arrived at pad 39A in Florida, where the vehicle will be lifted vertical in preparation for an in-flight test of the human-rated ship’s launch escape system Saturday. https://t.co/e9tMYft6Jd https://t.co/5y6fLudCmp

    https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/s...49441606164481

    IMG_20200116_152933.jpg

  11. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068
    In-flight abort test postponed to Sunday @8AM EST due to weather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  12. #102
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Weather: 60%

    SpaceX ✓ @SpaceX
    Standing down from today's in-flight Crew Dragon launch escape test attempt due to sustained winds and rough seas in the recovery area. Now targeting Sunday, January 19, with a six-hour test window opening at 8:00 a.m. EST, 13:00 UTC

    https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/1218473546772430848

  13. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068

    American human space capsule

    Spaceflightnow.com says launch delayed until at least 10AM ET due to weather.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  14. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    @nasaspaceflight
    10:30 AM EASTERN is the new T-0. Still unacceptable test conditions


    Crew access arm retracting

  15. #105
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,124
    Launched, escaped, and landed! Yay.
    Nice of them to wait until I was up and awake.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #106
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,684
    In itself, not very exciting - which is good. But, I am excited anyway because this probably means we won’t have to wait too long to see astronauts launching from the U.S. again and boy I have been waiting for that.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  17. #107
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,636
    I'm sure the CTS-100 abort computer simulation looked absolutely glorious on some Boeing 32" 4K monitor, but if it would be me climbing into a capsule, I'd prefer the low-res images of an actual abort test like the one SpaceX just did. Those 10 actual parachute tests also seemed to have payed of: everything looked perfectly norminal.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #108
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,068
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    In itself, not very exciting - which is good.
    I thought it was exciting - with escape engines firing & boosters exploding.
    Hopefully, it was a once in a lifetime opportunity to see the system in action.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  19. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,684
    Knowing what was supposed to happen dimmed any excitement I might have had, and the clouds made it all a bit less impressive visually than it might have been otherwise. But the apparent good result did make me happy.

    I agree about hoping never to see it outside of testing. I don’t need that kind of excitement.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  20. #110
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    @julia_bergeron
    A better look at the Crew Dragon capsule that experienced some significant stresses during the In-Flight Abort Test. If I had not seen the Super Dracos ignite today you would have a hard time convincing me it happened with this capsule. It's that clean. #IFA https://t.co/qD9ZmNEG4v

    IMG_20200120_021025.jpg

    https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/s...79319089303555

  21. #111
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,636
    [insert capsule too clean conspiracy theory here]
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  22. #112
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Oops

    https://spacenews.com/boeing-takes-4...w-test-flight/

    Boeing takes $410 million charge to cover potential additional commercial crew test flight

    WASHINGTON — Boeing is taking a $410 million charge to its earnings to cover a potential additional uncrewed test flight of its CST-100 Starliner, although company officials say there’s no decision yet about whether such a flight is necessary.

    The company said in its fourth quarter earnings release Jan. 29 that it was taking the charge “primarily to provision for an additional uncrewed mission for the Commercial Crew program, performance and mix.” It noted that NASA was still reviewing data from the Orbital Flight Test (OFT) mission in December that was cut short, without a docking at the International Space Station, by a timer problem.
    >
    >

  23. #113
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,124
    One flight is 410 million dollars? Wow!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #114
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Ferchrissake...

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...are-bug-found/

    Starliner faced catastrophic failure before software bug found

    During its quarterly meeting on Thursday, NASA's Aersopace Safety Advisory Panel dropped some significant news about a critical commercial crew test flight. The panel revealed that Boeing's Starliner may have been lost during a December mission had a software error not been found and fixed while the vehicle was in orbit.

    The software issue was identified during testing on the ground after Starliner's launch, said panel member Paul Hill, a former flight director and former director of mission operations at Johnson Space Center in Houston. The problem would have interfered with the service module's (SM) separation from the Starliner capsule.

    "While this anomaly was corrected in flight, if it had gone uncorrected it would have led to erroneous thruster firing and uncontrolled motion during SM separation for deorbit, with the potential for catastrophic spacecraft failure," Hill said during the meeting.

    >
    The safety panel also recommended that NASA conduct "an even broader" assessment of Boeing's Systems Engineering and Integration processes. Only after these assessments, Hill said, should NASA determine whether the Starliner spacecraft will conduct a second, uncrewed flight test into orbit before astronauts fly on board.
    >

  25. #115
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    49,526
    One begins to wonder if Boeing needs some computer science help.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  26. #116
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    Here we go...

    Eric Berger @SciGuySpace (Ars Technica)
    Working date for SpaceX's Demo-2 launch is May 7. Dragon is in good shape.

    Launch date is fluid and mission may move into late April, or push later into May depending on a number of variables not hardware related. No final decision yet on duration.
    |
    Why don't they know the duration of the mission yet? Short answer is there are a lot of moving parts. NASA wants to minimize time of 3 ISS crew members. Still not sure when first SpX operational mission will take place, or when Boeing's OFT flight will occur.
    ||
    Dark Energy @Alejandro_DebH
    I've heard from a good source mission duration is likely to be around 6 weeks, not too long not too short. And yeah, launch day is still very very fluid but looking like it'll be in Q2 of this year.
    ||
    Doug @dougbrec
    Any idea when USCV1 hardware will be at the cape?
    ||
    Dark Energy @Alejandro_DebH
    Likely to be at the Cape before summer

    NOTE: if this goes as planned the first SpaceX operational crew mission would be USCV-1. Boeing's still in the wood shed.

    Thread
    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/stat...12345571635200

  27. #117
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,636
    Is it standard procedure or is there a specific reason why they need a second unmanned demo flight? Was there anything not yet demonstrated in DEMO-1 (longer duration perhaps?) or do they simply want confirmation? Not that I'm against that.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  28. #118
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,124
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Is it standard procedure or is there a specific reason why they need a second unmanned demo flight? Was there anything not yet demonstrated in DEMO-1 (longer duration perhaps?) or do they simply want confirmation? Not that I'm against that.
    I think Demo 2 is manned.
    Boeing should definitely have to do another unmanned one.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #119
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,636
    Google tells me DEMO-2 should indeed be manned.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  30. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,684
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Here we go...

    Eric Berger @SciGuySpace (Ars Technica)
    Working date for SpaceX's Demo-2 launch is May 7. Dragon is in good shape.
    Follow up article in ars technica on crewed Dragon launch details:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...ly-may-launch/
    Last edited by Van Rijn; 2020-Feb-12 at 10:10 AM. Reason: Added detail

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •