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Thread: American human space capsule

  1. #151
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    Edit: never mind. moved to "When you just HAVE to make a joke".

  2. #152
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    "NASA and Boeing outline schedule of Starliner test flights"

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-and-boein...-test-flights/

    NASA and Boeing announced an updated schedule of test flights of the company’s CST-100 Starliner commercial crew vehicle that would allow it to begin operational missions to the International Space Station at the end of 2021.

    In an Aug. 28 statement, NASA said it had scheduled a second uncrewed test flight, known as Orbital Flight Test (OFT) 2, for no earlier than December. That mission will be a repeat of the original OFT mission flown last December, which was cut short by technical problems that prevented the spacecraft from approaching and docking with the ISS.

    The NASA statement confirmed recent comments by agency officials on the schedule for OFT-2. “The Boeing folks are working hard for their reflight to be done by the end of the year, maybe early January,” Kathy Lueders, NASA associate administrator for human exploration and operations, said in an Aug. 24 webinar during the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Propulsion and Energy Forum.
    I am because we are
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  3. #153
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    "Boeing's Starliner makes progress ahead of flight test with astronauts"

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/B...nauts_999.html

    NASA and Boeing continue to make progress toward the company's second uncrewed flight test of the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft prior to flying astronauts to the International Space Station as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

    The Commercial Crew Program currently is targeting no earlier than December 2020 for launch of the uncrewed Orbital Flight Test-2 (OFT-2) pending hardware readiness, flight software qualification, and launch vehicle and space station manifest priorities.
    I am because we are
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  4. #154
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    If you just read these two articles you would think OFT-1 had a couple of minor glitches rather than being a fiasco that revealed 80 faults on a vehicle that was supposedly performing its final test before going live. Really wish the money spent on Starliner had gone to the Dreamchaser.

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    If you just read these two articles you would think OFT-1 had a couple of minor glitches rather than being a fiasco that revealed 80 faults on a vehicle that was supposedly performing its final test before going live. Really wish the money spent on Starliner had gone to the Dreamchaser.
    Agreed, and Boeing's really in the woodshed over this and other screwups.

    Meanwhile, Dream Chaser faces its own challenge; it's married to the Vulcan-Centaur launcher which, with New Glenn, is delayed by Blue Origin's persistent BE-4 engine troubles. Now Blue's saying it won't hit stride until Block 2, for which they're hiring a new Chief Engineer for the development team. Hmmm...

    ----------

    Thomas Pesquet (ESA) is riding Crew Dragon for the March/April Crew-2 mission.

    https://twitter.com/Thom_astro/statu...89832269803520

    Translation,

    45 years of cockpit evolution!! I had the chance to be at the controls of the very analog (and hyper reliable) #Soyuz, the @ Airbus Airbus A310 from Novespace, the A350, then finally the @SpaceX Crew Dragon and its cockpit (almost) fully digital. #AvGeek*

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Agreed, and Boeing's really in the woodshed over this and other screwups.
    Yeah, and we still have the SLS hotfire to look forward to this year, you would like to think they've done a better job there, but I wouldn't want to bet anything valuable on it.

    Meanwhile, Dream Chaser faces its own challenge; it's married to the Vulcan-Centaur launcher which, with New Glenn, is delayed by Blue Origin's persistent BE-4 engine troubles. Now Blue's saying it won't hit stride until Block 2, for which they're hiring a new Chief Engineer for the development team. Hmmm...
    Yeah SNC are in a corner. After all the need for redundancy means that even if they could get a ride on the Falcon 9 NASA would probably reject it. When they originally signed up with ULA they were looking at flying on a nice, proven, Atlas V. Really, really wish that Blue Origin would put something out deck besides the New Shepard.

    ----------

    Thomas Pesquet (ESA) is riding Crew Dragon for the March/April Crew-2 mission.

    https://twitter.com/Thom_astro/statu...89832269803520

    Translation,
    Very cool.

  7. #157
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    First US Space Force astronaut: Michael Hopkins

    Mission: Crew Dragon Crew-1

    In French
    https://twitter.com/spacemen1969/sta...39097568022528

    Translation: The first astronaut in the US Space Force should be Michael Hopkins according to this list of appointments (with the rank of Colonel)

    https://t.co/yK31zUkkM5?amp=1

    IMG_20200926_091605.jpg

  8. #158
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    The commander of Boeing’s first Starliner mission says he’s decided to step down for personal reasons.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/10/07/tech/...scn/index.html

    New York (CNN Business)Former NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson says he no longer plans to command the first-ever crewed mission of the Boeing Starliner, the spacecraft he's spent the last decade helping to build.

    NASA and Boeing made the announcement Wednesday morning, saying Ferguson made the decision for "personal reasons." Ferguson said in a follow-up tweet that he plans to prioritize his family, and he "made several commitments which I simply cannot risk missing."

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    The commander of Boeing’s first Starliner mission says he’s decided to step down for personal reasons.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/10/07/tech/...scn/index.html
    Well I suppose with the flight being 18 months later than expected its not entirely surprising, but I also wouldn't be surprised if it reflected a lack of confidence in Starliner whatever he has to say in public.

  10. #160
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    Sounds like Starliner OFT-2 (rerun uncrewed test flight) is slipping into Q1 2021, if not later.

    Boeing just hired a former SpaceX & Tesla software guru to sort out their software mess.

    https://www.defensenews.com/industry...executive-job/

    Boeing hires former SpaceX engineer for new software executive job

    WASHINGTON — Boeing on Friday announced it hired Jinnah Hosein as vice president of software engineering, a new role at the aerospace giant.
    >
    Hosein’s resume reads like a defense industry wish list of Silicon Valley stops. He worked as Google’s director of software engineering for cloud networking, helped design Tesla’s autopilot software and most recently worked as software lead for self-driving startup Aurora.

    But it’s his experiences at SpaceX — where he was key to software development for the Falcon, Falcon Heavy, Dragon and Crew Dragon vehicles — that Boeing may look to draw from the most.
    >
    Crew Dragon certified!

    https://spacenews.com/nasa-certifies...crew-1-launch/

    NASA certifies SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft ahead of Crew-1 launch

    WASHINGTON — NASA formally certified SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft for transporting astronauts to and from the International Space Station, clearing the way for a Nov. 14 launch.

    Agency officials completed the certification of the spacecraft by signing a document known as a Human Rating Certification Plan during a flight readiness review for the Crew-1 mission Nov. 10. That confirmed that SpaceX met all of NASA’s requirements for safely carrying astronauts on the Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 launch vehicle.
    >
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Nov-12 at 11:48 PM.

  11. #161
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    More bad news for astronauts on long-duration space missions, across a number of health categories.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/25/healt...rnd/index.html

    "The 30 studies, authored by more than 200 researchers from around the world, represent the largest body of information on the risks of space flight to the human body. The studies identify six key molecular changes that may have a significant impact on astronaut health. Understanding these changes is key for preparing for long-term spaceflight missions to the moon and Mars in the future. The Biology of Spaceflight collection of 30 studies published Wednesday in the journals Cell, Cell Reports, Cell Systems, Patterns and iScience. The six molecular changes that occur during spaceflight include DNA damage, oxidative stress, alterations of telomere length, shifts in the microbiome, mitochondrial dysfunction and gene regulation."

    https://www.cell.com/c/the-biology-of-spaceflight
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  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    More bad news for astronauts on long-duration space missions, across a number of health categories.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/25/healt...rnd/index.html

    "The 30 studies, authored by more than 200 researchers from around the world, represent the largest body of information on the risks of space flight to the human body. The studies identify six key molecular changes that may have a significant impact on astronaut health. Understanding these changes is key for preparing for long-term spaceflight missions to the moon and Mars in the future. The Biology of Spaceflight collection of 30 studies published Wednesday in the journals Cell, Cell Reports, Cell Systems, Patterns and iScience. The six molecular changes that occur during spaceflight include DNA damage, oxidative stress, alterations of telomere length, shifts in the microbiome, mitochondrial dysfunction and gene regulation."

    https://www.cell.com/c/the-biology-of-spaceflight
    Hello Roger,

    It is clear to me that long term space voyages will require the development of rotationally generated artificial gravity and better radiation protection, both of which need to be developed. Every time I bring it up, some space fans insist this is unnecessary.

    Musk insists they will send people to Mars within a few Synods. Meh.

    cheers,

  13. #163
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    Mitochondrial issues can sometimes be resolved by using melatonin.

  14. #164
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    Not sure what deep space flight has to do with either Starliner or Dragon?

  15. #165
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    Good Lord...

    Loren Grush ✓ @lorengrush (The Verge)
    In November, engineers at Lockheed Martin and NASA discovered that a power unit in Orion’s adapter had failed in such a way that it lost redundancy. Now they’re trying to figure out the best way to fix it, with some options taking between 4 and 12 months. https://t.co/FR6NnSvyJ2 https://t.co/26Wb0zJKQB

    https://twitter.com/lorengrush/statu...45520560746496

  16. #166
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    Meanwhile in Texas, someone is hoisting a Tesla battery pack from the back of a pickup and scissor lifts it to the top of a glorified interplanetary water tower to bolt it on. And it works.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Meanwhile in Texas, someone is hoisting a Tesla battery pack from the back of a pickup and scissor lifts it to the top of a glorified interplanetary water tower to bolt it on. And it works.
    f I remember rightly on one of the early Falcon 9 tests they decided there was an issue with the engine bell and they sent out a guy with tinsnips to modify it?

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    If I remember rightly on one of the early Falcon 9 tests they decided there was an issue with the engine bell and they sent out a guy with tinsnips to modify it?
    It was an acrophobic SpaceX technician named Marty Anderson, flown to the Cape on Elon's private jet. Up on a man lift he went, crawling into the F9's interstage with his tools, a measuring tape, and a roll of blue tape.

    1606958167691.jpg

    https://www.elonx.net/spacex-stories...-fix-a-rocket/

  19. #169
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    New uncrewed Starliner test coming up. Having fallen from a height of 35,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert, Boeing’s Starliner space capsule successfully completed its parachute balloon drop test on Monday, clearing the way for crewed test flights. Unlike SpaceX’s Dragon capsule, which uses parachutes to slow it for water landings, the Starliner employs a multi-stage system of parachutes and airbags to cushion its landings on solid ground. According to Boing, the Starliner is actually the first American-made lander designed to land on land.

    Up next the Starliner is scheduled conduct its Orbital Flight Test 2 in early 2021. This is a redo of OFT-1, which which successfully launched and returned to Earth in December 2019 but failed to reach the ISS. A four-month review of the failed test flight uncovered 80 issues that must be rectified before OFT-2 can take off. Boeing plans to eat the $410 million cost for OFT-2 rather than charge taxpayers to retry a test it bungled the first time around. Should OFT-2 successfully reach the ISS and safely return to Earth, the Starliner will be allowed to test crewed flight.

    https://www.engadget.com/boeings-sta...175507909.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #170
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    Boeing and NASA announced on Wednesday (Dec. 9) that they're targeting March 29 for the uncrewed Orbital Flight Test 2 (OFT-2), Starliner's second attempt to meet up with the orbiting lab. On the first try, in December 2019, Starliner suffered a glitch with its onboard timing system, got stranded in the wrong orbit and came back down to Earth without achieving the planned rendezvous. A post-flight investigation of OFT-1 revealed several problems with the capsule's software. But the Starliner team has been working through those issues and is now formally qualifying the flight software ahead of OFT-2.

    https://www.space.com/boeing-starlin...ch-2021-launch
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    New uncrewed Starliner test coming up. Having fallen from a height of 35,000 feet and landed safely in the New Mexico desert, Boeing’s Starliner space capsule successfully completed its parachute balloon drop test on Monday, clearing the way for crewed test flights. Unlike SpaceX’s Dragon capsule, which uses parachutes to slow it for water landings, the Starliner employs a multi-stage system of parachutes and airbags to cushion its landings on solid ground. According to Boing, the Starliner is actually the first American-made lander designed to land on land.

    Up next the Starliner is scheduled conduct its Orbital Flight Test 2 in early 2021. This is a redo of OFT-1, which which successfully launched and returned to Earth in December 2019 but failed to reach the ISS. A four-month review of the failed test flight uncovered 80 issues that must be rectified before OFT-2 can take off. Boeing plans to eat the $410 million cost for OFT-2 rather than charge taxpayers to retry a test it bungled the first time around. Should OFT-2 successfully reach the ISS and safely return to Earth, the Starliner will be allowed to test crewed flight.

    https://www.engadget.com/boeings-sta...175507909.html
    My bold. Typo aside, that's a really awkward sentence, and kind of ignores both the shuttle and Boeing's own X-37. And SpaceX's dragon was originally designed for a propulsive landing on land. And Blue Origin's new Shepherd...

    Boing, boing!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #172
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    American human space capsule

    If they had substituted “capsule” for “lander” it would have been better.

    ETA: original Gemini capsule designs included skids and a parawing thingy for runway landings.

  23. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    If they had substituted “capsule” for “lander” it would have been better.
    Indeed. And extremely incorrect, because Soyuz!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #174
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    American-made. Which Soyuz, let me take off my tinfoil hat to check... is not.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  25. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    American-made. Which Soyuz, let me take off my tinfoil hat to check... is not.
    Oops!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #176
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    Its still a tortured phrase and I can't help but think its designed to try and draw attention away from the fact that by the time OFT-2 launches it will be two years since Demo-1 flew. It's a remarkably thin claim to fame though I guess its preferable to 'most software faults in a manned capsule'.

  27. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    American-made. Which Soyuz, let me take off my tinfoil hat to check... is not.
    But it is rumored the Soyuz was designed after the GE Apollo spacecraft design, right?

    http://www.astronautix.com/s/soyuzwa...ignstolen.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo...arity_to_Soyuz
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  28. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Boeing and NASA announced on Wednesday (Dec. 9) that they're targeting March 29 for the uncrewed Orbital Flight Test 2 (OFT-2), Starliner's second attempt to meet up with the orbiting lab. On the first try, in December 2019, Starliner suffered a glitch with its onboard timing system, got stranded in the wrong orbit and came back down to Earth without achieving the planned rendezvous. A post-flight investigation of OFT-1 revealed several problems with the capsule's software. But the Starliner team has been working through those issues and is now formally qualifying the flight software ahead of OFT-2.

    https://www.space.com/boeing-starlin...ch-2021-launch
    Astronaut crew names for the future missions of Boeing's Starliner.

    https://scitechdaily.com/nasa-and-bo...space-station/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  29. #179
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    Starliner launch dates depend on fixing the software bugs.

    https://spacenews.com/next-starliner...or-late-march/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  30. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Starliner launch dates depend on fixing the software bugs.

    https://spacenews.com/next-starliner...or-late-march/
    And there was me naively thinking they wouldn't set a date unless all the bugs were fixed. So more than likely this will wind up drifting into Q2 2021.

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