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Thread: The Fermi Paradox II — Solutions and Ideas

  1. #91
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    It seems likely that there's a great deal we don't know about what happens when an object assumes an effective velocity greater than that of light. There may be some factor that prevents certain uses of closed time-like curves, and so, causal paradoxes. It might even be that these CTCs are intentionally avoided, to prevent confusion-- Rather like everyone driving in the same direction on roadways.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    It seems likely that there's a great deal we don't know about what happens when an object assumes an effective velocity greater than that of light. There may be some factor that prevents certain uses of closed time-like curves, and so, causal paradoxes. It might even be that these CTCs are intentionally avoided, to prevent confusion-- Rather like everyone driving in the same direction on roadways.
    IMO the fact we have not been visited by folks from the future indicates it΄s not possible. I cant see everyone following the law re CTC. There would always be someone wanting to exploit time travel, just like someone always breaks the law or highway code.

  3. #93
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    When Dr. Harold White was asked about the use of a space warp causing causality disruptions, he replied that an object inside a warp domain does not move through space. He may have something there.
    If there is no basis for comparison of relative motion in two reference frames, it does not seem that time paradoxes can arise. At least this comparison of motion in two frames of reference is how the creation of causality violations are usually explained.
    When an object leaves a warp domain and enters normal space, it is no longer moving at an effective speed greater than that of light. Does the fact that is has arrived at point B, after having left point A, and has done so in less time than a ray of light suddenly create a time paradox?
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2016-Jan-02 at 10:54 PM.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    When Dr. Harold White was asked about the use of a space warp causing causality disruptions, he replied that an object inside a warp domain does not move through space. He may have something there.
    He is categorically wrong. I already had very little confidence in Dr White's speculations; I now have none.

    It does not matter what happens to an observer inside the warp bubble; what is important is the relationship between the information inside that bubble and any observers in any conceivable frame of reference that the warp bubble can exchange information with.

  5. #95
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    When an object leaves a warp domain and enters normal space, it is no longer moving at an effective speed greater than that of light. Does the fact that is has arrived at point B, after having left point A, and has done so in less time than a ray of light suddenly create a time paradox?
    In many cases, yes it will. Any method of transferring information faster than light can be used as a so-called 'antitelephone' to send messages (and spoilers) into the past. There are exceptions where no such transfer is possible, but this depends on the time/space separation between the observers, and not on conditions inside the bubble.

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