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Thread: Caltech: Researchers Find Evidence of a 'Real' Ninth Planet

  1. #31
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    Percival Lowell hunted for Planet X, and Clyde Tombaugh found it in Pluto. The X was unknown, not 10, historically.
    Last edited by 01101001; 2016-Jan-21 at 12:54 AM.
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    Skepticism enables us to distinguish fancy from fact, to test our speculations. --Carl Sagan

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiery Phoenix View Post
    Subaru is supposed to be able to detect it, assuming it is where/what we think it is. But it still won't be easy!
    From Wikipedia
    Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system (SCExAO) is a high-contrast imaging system for directly imaging of exoplanets. The coronagraph uses a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) design which means it will be able to image planets closer to their stars than conventional Lyot type coronagraph designs. For example, at a distance of 100 pc, the PIAA coronagraph on SCExAO would be able to image from 4 AU outwards while Gemini Planet Imager and VLT-SPHERE from 12 AU outwards.[14] The system also has several other types of coronagraph: Vortex, Four-Quadrant Phase Mask and 8-Octant Phase Mask versions, and a shaped pupil coronagraph.[15] The phase I of construction is complete[16] and phase II construction to be complete by end of 2014[17] for science operations in 2015. SCExAO will initially use the HiCIAO camera but this will be replaced by CHARIS,[18] an integral field spectrograph, around 2016.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru..._Optics_system

    I didnt realise the full capabilities of Subaru until I read the wiki.

    not so much Subaru Impreza more Subaru seriously Impressive
    Its never too late to have a happy childhood

  3. #33
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    Planet Nine is what Brown and co. are calling it right now. I'm okay with that until we get a confirmation of something.
    “Of all the sciences cultivated by mankind, Astronomy is acknowledged to be, and undoubtedly is, the most sublime, the most interesting, and the most useful. For, by knowledge derived from this science, not only the bulk of the Earth is discovered, but our very faculties are enlarged with the grandeur of the ideas it conveys, our minds exalted above their low contracted prejudices.” - James Ferguson

  4. #34
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    How about Planet Nine From (Really) Outer Space in honor of Edward D. Wood Jr.?

  5. #35
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    Or Love Planet Number Nine?

    Or, somewhat cryptically:

    Turn Me On, Dead Man?
    As above, so below

  6. #36
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    I do love the irony of the so-called Pluto Killer now championing the existence of a 9th planet a decade later. Here's a cute tweet he just posted:

    https://twitter.com/plutokiller/stat...98851080634368
    Last edited by Fiery Phoenix; 2016-Jan-21 at 07:02 PM.
    “Of all the sciences cultivated by mankind, Astronomy is acknowledged to be, and undoubtedly is, the most sublime, the most interesting, and the most useful. For, by knowledge derived from this science, not only the bulk of the Earth is discovered, but our very faculties are enlarged with the grandeur of the ideas it conveys, our minds exalted above their low contracted prejudices.” - James Ferguson

  7. #37
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    How about they call it Pluto, and rename the current Pluto to be Plutonetto?
    As above, so below

  8. #38
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    I'm cautiously optimistic.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    How about Planet Nine From (Really) Outer Space in honor of Edward D. Wood Jr.?
    ToPetered. Oh, and ToSeeked too.
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  10. #40
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    Planet X was originally the ninth planet. It only became "Planet Ten" after Charon was discovered and we learned how small Pluto actually was.

    Anyhoo....

    Mike, Mike Mike, why? Why are you going all Tyche on us now? I love you man but this is too much. It's not like you're the first person to propose this planet; it's been talked about for three years. Do you really have to go to the press with a snazzy name and a welcome wagon? Can't we just wait until an actual confirmation? Or do you really want to be the next Percival Lowell?

  11. #41
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    Is this suspected planet actually in our solar system or outside it? As in outside or inside the heliosphere?

  12. #42
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    The heliosphere has been somewhat overrated as the "edge of the Solar System". Even Eris, let alone Sedna, is outside the heliosphere.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    The heliosphere has been somewhat overrated as the "edge of the Solar System". Even Eris, let alone Sedna, is outside the heliosphere.
    Okay. I´m wondering how close it ever comes to inner solar system if it takes 10k-20k years to orbit the sun. Could it have some major impact on earth at its closest pass?

  14. #44
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    It's a long way to the next star, Proximus, so the legrange point must be in the order of half way there, I don't know how far that is away but this ninth planet is surely well inside that limit.?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    It's a long way to the next star, Proximus, so the legrange point must be in the order of half way there, I don't know how far that is away but this ninth planet is surely well inside that limit.?
    The distance to Proxima Centauri is about 250,000 AU. This possible planet would be a few tenths of a percent that far from the Sun... so that's not an issue.
    - Jetlack -- Okay. I´m wondering how close it ever comes to inner solar system if it takes 10k-20k years to orbit the sun. Could it have some major impact on earth at its closest pass?
    Well, it might be that its orbit takes it inward to the outer edge of the Kuiper belt, which might slightly increase the number of comets we see ... or more likely, the orbit doesn't get that close, so it seems unlikely that Earth is affected.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  16. #46
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    Okay, here's an official page with some answers:

    http://www.findplanetnine.com/p/blog-page.html

    - at perihelion, even if it is at the purported 200 AU (way outside the Kuiper Belt Cliff), it would be roughly 18th mag an easily detectable. So it's very unlikely to be that close.

    - factoring in different sky surveys, it is quite likely to be near aphelion, at roughly 23rd magnitude - quite a bit brighter than I had expected! - and in front of the Milky Way. >_>

  17. #47
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    Thanks for the answers. Pretty cool thinking there could be something this huge sort of lurking way out there.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetlack View Post
    Is this suspected planet actually in our solar system or outside it? As in outside or inside the heliosphere?
    It's in the Solar System (which is why this news is such a big deal in the first place), just way, way out there.
    “Of all the sciences cultivated by mankind, Astronomy is acknowledged to be, and undoubtedly is, the most sublime, the most interesting, and the most useful. For, by knowledge derived from this science, not only the bulk of the Earth is discovered, but our very faculties are enlarged with the grandeur of the ideas it conveys, our minds exalted above their low contracted prejudices.” - James Ferguson

  19. #49
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    Indeed.

    Please note the difference between Heliosphere (the region where space is filled by the solar wind) and the Sun's Hill sphere (the gravitational influence of the Sun, extending out about one light year!).

  20. #50
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    “Of all the sciences cultivated by mankind, Astronomy is acknowledged to be, and undoubtedly is, the most sublime, the most interesting, and the most useful. For, by knowledge derived from this science, not only the bulk of the Earth is discovered, but our very faculties are enlarged with the grandeur of the ideas it conveys, our minds exalted above their low contracted prejudices.” - James Ferguson

  21. #51
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    Phil was on the local (Seattle) radio station - KIRO - this morning with a nice description of the evidence.

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiery Phoenix View Post
    Love the top comment

    If found they should name it Nibiru just to screw with the conspiracy theorists.
    Its never too late to have a happy childhood

  23. #53
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    Interesting news, very cool if confirmed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Alexander View Post
    Okay, here's an official page with some answers:

    http://www.findplanetnine.com/p/blog-page.html

    - at perihelion, even if it is at the purported 200 AU (way outside the Kuiper Belt Cliff), it would be roughly 18th mag an easily detectable. So it's very unlikely to be that close.

    - factoring in different sky surveys, it is quite likely to be near aphelion, at roughly 23rd magnitude - quite a bit brighter than I had expected! - and in front of the Milky Way. >_>
    If we assume it is now at aphelion then it would have been at perihelion around 1360AD. Could we see 18th mag objects those days?

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    If we assume it is now at aphelion then it would have been at perihelion around 1360AD. Could we see 18th mag objects those days?
    Considering that telescopes weren't invented until the 1960s, absolutely not.
    As above, so below

  26. #56
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    Just learned of this plausible hypothesis and was surprised to see it on the front cover of Scientific American. The AoP (argument of perihelion) for four, I think, objects at time article was written an eye opener and worth discussion. [plane departing]
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  27. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Considering that telescopes weren't invented until the 1960s, absolutely not.
    1960s seriously!!!

  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Considering that telescopes weren't invented until the 1960s, absolutely not.
    That will come as news to a certain Mr. Harriot and a certain Mr. Galilei.

  29. #59
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    9th planet?

    Caltech announced on the 20th of Jan that they have 'solid theoretical evidence' of a ninth planet. If it is there, why is it the 9th planet? The IAU, in there rules for a planets stated:-
    •It needs to be in orbit around the Sun – Yes, so maybe Pluto is a planet.
    •It needs to have enough gravity to pull itself into a spherical shape – Pluto…check
    •It needs to have “cleared the neighborhood” of its orbit – Uh oh. Here’s the rule breaker. According to this, Pluto is not a planet.
    At the moment we don't know about the 3rd point. So shouldn't we be calling it a large Kuiper belt object? And maybe the 2nd point too.

  30. #60
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    Here's a simulation of the theorized planet that's been making the news lately.
    http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySim...lanetNine.html

    https://twitter.com/tony873004/statu...83418610286593
    Last edited by tony873004; 2016-Jan-22 at 04:13 AM.

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