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Thread: Bigelow Space Habitats

  1. #91
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    Bigelow says, China and NASA are the two biggest obstacles to commercial space stations.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...-nasa-iss-b330

    According to Bigelow, China is the least of the two “big problems” for the future of commercial space stations. In the last decade, China—which was originally cut out of collaboration on the ISS—has seen its space program explode. Today, it is actively courting current ISS partner nations for collaboration on its own space station, which it plans to launch to have completed by the early 2020s. These are the same countries that would be potential customers for Bigelow and if they decide to enter into contracts to use China’s space station it would drastically reduce the size of the market for commercial space stations.

    “China is offering very attractive terms, conditions and features that commercial sector is going to have a horrible time trying to compete with,” Bigelow said.

    Yet the main threat to Bigelow’s commercial space stations is not China’s space station, but NASA’s own deep space ambitions. According to Bigelow, NASA is effectively forsaking international partnerships in Low Earth Orbit in favor of international collaboration on deep space programs like Gateway, a space station that would be in orbit between the Earth and the Moon—significantly farther from the Earth than Low Earth Orbit.

  2. #92
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    I can believe it, if it was Bigelow that said they can offer hotel stays in four years time. After all he has had experience with 3 modules that have been sent up to space. But for a start up to say that, I will take with a ton of salt.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...92-000-a-night

    Aboard the International Space Station, an astronaut’s life is typically work, exercise, rest, repeat. But what if your chance of having the right stuff for NASA’s astronaut corps is, to say the least, minimal?

    Aurora Station, billed as the “first luxury hotel in space,” may be for you. Houston-based Orion Span Inc. hopes to launch the modular station in late 2021 and welcome its first guests the following year, with two crew members accompanying each excursion. The platform would orbit 200 miles above Earth, offering six guests 384 sunrises and sunsets as they race around the planet for 12 days at incredibly high speeds.

    Once, such a thing would have clearly been the stuff of fiction. Now, in the age of SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Virgin Galactic, the idea that a private company would launch an orbiting hotel seems almost pedestrian.

    “We want to get people into space because it’s the final frontier for our civilization,” said Orion Span’s founder and chief executive officer, Frank Bunger, a former software engineer. Orion Span’s offering won’t be for everyone, however: Launch and re-entry are not for the faint of heart.

    “We’re not selling a hey-let’s-go-to-the-beach equivalent in space,” Bunger said. “We’re selling the experience of being an astronaut. You reckon that there are people who are willing to pay to have that experience.”
    Last edited by selvaarchi; 2018-Apr-06 at 08:58 PM.

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Bigelow says, China and NASA are the two biggest obstacles to commercial space stations.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...-nasa-iss-b330
    That would be neat but the $9.5 M for an 11 day stay is a bit out of my worth.

    https://www.space.com/35488-private-...iom-space.html

  4. #94
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    Acceptance of 'expandable' modules has been very slow. In context, extension of the ISS BEAM to 2028 seems a great NASA endorsement and achievement for Bigelow.

  5. #95
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    I wonder if a hab can be inflated while under parachute, to land a bit more softly on Mars.

  6. #96
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    Might increase the puncture risk. A non-issue for landing airbags as you'll never need them after landing anyway, but a habitat...
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    I wonder if a hab can be inflated while under parachute, to land a bit more softly on Mars.
    What kind of hab are you going to land under a parachute on Mars? You're going to have a hard time accommodating anything bigger than gerbils.

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