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Thread: Juno at Jupiter

  1. #61
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    Rapidly approaching the next maneuver, slated for 19 Oct 2016.

    http://spaceflight101.com/juno/juno-...ectory-design/

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    I only see four, but that doesn't mean another couldn't be instantaneously bright enough to see. The Galilean moons are much bigger than anything else though, and the others are not spherical, so seeing one orbit is highly unlikely.


    It's fun to watch the inner three big moons do their synchronous dance.
    1:2:4 ressonance if I'm not mistaken? If not apologies. Been quite a while.
    Last edited by Sardonicone; 2016-Oct-13 at 06:12 PM. Reason: so should have been not
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Rapidly approaching the next maneuver, slated for 19 Oct 2016.

    http://spaceflight101.com/juno/juno-...ectory-design/
    Just as I posted the expected burn, mission controllers delayed by at least one orbit the firing of the main engine to change the orbital period to ~14 days. The valves in the He pressurization system took too long to operate. Study ongoing.

    http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/miss...t-jupiter-pass

  4. #64
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    Juno goes into safe mode

    Science News

    NASA’s Juno spacecraft, in orbit around Jupiter since July 4, is lying low after entering an unexpected “safe mode” early on October 19. A misbehaving valve in the fuel system, not necessarily related to the safe mode, has also led to a delay in a planned engine burn that would have shortened the probe’s orbit.

    Juno turned off its science instruments and some other nonessential components this morning at 1:47 a.m. EDT after computers detected some unexpected situation, mission head Scott Bolton reported at an October 19 news conference. The spacecraft was hurtling toward its second close approach to the planet, soaring about 5,000 kilometers from the cloud tops. It has now passed that point and is moving back away from the planet with all science instruments switched off.
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  5. #65
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    not good news

  6. #66
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    May not be that bad (my bold):

    Mission Status Report

    NASA's Juno spacecraft entered safe mode Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). Early indications are a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The spacecraft acted as expected during the transition into safe mode, restarted successfully and is healthy. High-rate data has been restored, and the spacecraft is conducting flight software diagnostics. All instruments are off, and the planned science data collection for today's close flyby of Jupiter (perijove 2), did not occur.

    "At the time safe mode was entered, the spacecraft was more than 13 hours from its closest approach to Jupiter," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We were still quite a ways from the planet's more intense radiation belts and magnetic fields. The spacecraft is healthy and we are working our standard recovery procedure."

    The spacecraft is designed to enter safe mode if its onboard computer perceives conditions are not as expected. In this case, the safe mode turned off instruments and a few non-critical spacecraft components, and it confirmed the spacecraft was pointed toward the sun to ensure the solar arrays received power.

    Mission managers are continuing to study an unrelated issue with the performance of a pair of valves that are part of the spacecraft's propulsion system. Last week the decision was made to postpone a burn of the spacecraft's main engine that would have reduced Juno's orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days.
    Full NASA statement here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6653

  7. #67
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    Ah great. That's a relief. It was enough with the Mars curse kicking in again. I do NOT want to lose this one. It could potentially overturn everything.
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  8. #68
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    Jupiter is happy seeing Juno. Don't believe me than who is Jupiter smiling at

    http://www.scienceworldreport.com/ar...miley-face.htm

    NASA's Juno spacecraft managed to capture a cute photo of Jupiter before the computers onboard the module crashed. The image makes it seem as if Jupiter is actually a giant smiley face. As per NASA, the smiling effect was actually caused by the swirling atmosphere of the giant planet's South Pole.

  9. #69
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    Before going into safe mode, Juno managed to peep deep inside Jupiter.

    http://www.americaspace.com/?p=95975

    NASA’s Juno spacecraft has been busy orbiting Jupiter and providing fantastic new views of this giant world, something not possible since the previous Galileo mission. While almost flawless so far, the mission has had a few hiccups recently however. Juno entered safe mode just shortly before its next close flyby of Jupiter this week, apparently the result of a software performance monitor inducing a reboot of the spacecraft’s onboard computer. The spacecraft is otherwise healthy however and Juno is conducting its own software diagnostics to determine the specific cause of the problem. Before this however, Juno took its first observations deep into Jupiter’s turbulent atmosphere.

    “At the time safe mode was entered, the spacecraft was more than 13 hours from its closest approach to Jupiter,” said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. “We were still quite a ways from the planet’s more intense radiation belts and magnetic fields. The spacecraft is healthy and we are working our standard recovery procedure.”

    The onboard computer rebooted successfully and high-rate data is still being sent back to Earth. Typically, a spacecraft will enter safe mode if its computer detects an anomaly in the general conditions of the spacecraft. It is more of a precaution, so that engineers can assess the problem. Juno turned off its scientific instruments and other non-critical components, but is otheriwise healthy with its solar panels still facing the Sun. It is expected that the situation can be remedied soon, as happens in most cases such as this.

    Juno first entered safe mode on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). The spacecraft conducted its close orbital flyby of Jupiter on Wednesday, Oct. 19, but because it was in safe mode at the time, no science data was collected unfortunately. The next close flyby is scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 11.

  10. #70
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    Hopefully the valve opening issues will be solved and the burn conducted at that time.

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Hopefully the valve opening issues will be solved and the burn conducted at that time.
    It was a problem with a software performance monitor that induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer and not the valve.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Sc...flyby_999.html

    NASA's Juno spacecraft entered safe mode Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). Early indications are a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The spacecraft acted as expected during the transition into safe mode, restarted successfully and is healthy. High-rate data has been restored and the spacecraft is conducting flight software diagnostics.

    All instruments are off and the planned science data collection for this close flyby of Jupiter (perijove 2), did not occur.

    "At the time safe mode was entered, the spacecraft was more than 13 hours from its closest approach to Jupiter," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We were still quite a ways from the planet's more intense radiation belts and magnetic fields. The spacecraft is healthy and we are working our standard recovery procedure."

    The spacecraft is designed to enter safe mode if its onboard computer perceives conditions are not as expected. In this case, the safe mode turned off instruments and a few non-critical spacecraft components, and confirmed the spacecraft was pointed toward the Sun to ensure the solar arrays received power.

    Mission managers are continuing to study an unrelated issue with the performance of a pair of valves that are part of the spacecraft's propulsion system. Last week the decision was made to postpone a burn of the spacecraft's main engine that would have reduced Juno's orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days.

  12. #72
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    I was referring to the valve issue, not the software reboot to safe mode.

  13. #73
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    Juno performs a trim maneuver, in preparation for the next close flyby of Jupiter.

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6661

    In preparation for that close flyby of Jupiter, Juno executed an orbital trim maneuver Tuesday at 11:51 a.m. PDT (2:51 p.m. EDT) using its smaller thrusters. The burn, which lasted just over 31 minutes, changed Juno's orbital velocity by about 5.8 mph (2.6 meters per second) and consumed about 8 pounds (3.6 kilograms) of propellant. Juno will perform its next science flyby of Jupiter on Dec. 11, with time of closest approach to the gas giant occurring at 9:03 a.m. PDT (12:03 p.m. EDT). The complete suite of Juno's science instruments, as well as the JunoCam imager, will be collecting data during the upcoming flyby.

    "We are all excited and eagerly anticipating this next pass close to Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "The science collected so far has been truly amazing."

  14. #74
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    I wonder why the announcement did not include any orbital parameters. From: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/where it looks like the satellite is close to its Apojove.

  15. #75
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    Early results from Juno have come in

    http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/mi...ugh-eyes-juno/

    As of August 27, Juno had safely arrived at Jupiter, assuming its initial 53-day polar orbit while making its first closest approach. A polar orbit allowed for the August 27 observation of Jupiter’s aurora. With evidence of the structure being influenced by the moons Io, Europa, and Ganymede, Juno provided a new perspective of the phenomena until recently only observed from Earth-based telescopes.

    “Nothing about the aurora was as expected,” said Scott Bolton, associate vice president of R&D at SwRI, as he spoke to the curious listeners at the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Pasadena, Calif., on Oct. 19.

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    I was referring to the valve issue, not the software reboot to safe mode.
    You were right to worry about the valve issue as now Juno will stay in its current orbit until February or longer until the engineers can figure out what is wrong.

    http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/10/28...oblem-lingers/

    NASA’s Juno spacecraft will stay in its current long-period orbit around Jupiter until at least February, and perhaps longer, as engineers study balky valves inside the science probe’s propulsion system and an unexpected computer reboot that interrupted key functions of the orbiter earlier this month.

    The spacecraft has recovered from the software fault that triggered a computer reboot Oct. 18, a day before Juno flew by Jupiter less than 3,000 miles (5,000 kilometers) above the giant planet’s cloud tops.

    Engineers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin, Juno’s contractor, are still investigating the root cause of the problem that put the probe into safe mode. NASA said a software performance monitor on Juno induced a reboot of the spacecraft’s on-board computer.

    In the meantime, Juno remains in an orbit that takes it once around Jupiter every 53.5 days, an elongated, highly elliptical path that officials meant for the spacecraft to fly in for the first three-and-a-half months after it arrived at the gas giant July 4.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    You were right to worry about the valve issue as now Juno will stay in its current orbit until February or longer until the engineers can figure out what is wrong.
    Emily Lakdawalla latest post on Juno now says "53.5-day orbits for the foreseeable future"

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...no-update.html

    Juno suffered two setbacks in October. First, a problem with check valves in the main thruster system prevented a planned rocket burn during its October 19 close pass by Jupiter. The science team raced to use the burnless perijove pass to do some science, but then the spacecraft went into safe mode on October 19, before perijove, and before the science sequences could kick in. Juno exited safe mode on October 24 and performed a half-hour burn with its maneuvering thrusters -- not its main thrusters, which were still not being used, pending the outcome of the investigation into the check valve problem. An article at Spaceflight Now goes into much more detail about the investigation into both engine problem and safing event.

    At the DPS/EPSC meeting last week, principal investigator Scott Bolton spoke about keeping Juno in its long, 53.5-day orbit for a long time, not ruling out the possibility of performing the entire mission in such an orbit. Juno only gets exposed to dangerous radiation when very close to Jupiter, so the spacecraft wouldn't be exposed to any additional radiation by doing this, though it would seriously prolong the mission. If the mission has not ended by September 2019, Jupiter will have traveled far enough around the Sun that Juno will pass into Jupiter's shadow for several hours on every orbit, a condition that it was not designed for and which could harm its power system; the mission would need to develop a solution to that problem.

  18. #78
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    The latest news is even if Juno has to stay at it's present orbit, it will manage to meet it's science goals although it will take a lot longer to do so.

    http://www.popsci.com/nasa-juno-is-exploring-jupiter

    There was much excitement when the Juno spacecraft successfully arrived at Jupiter in July after a five-year journey through the solar system. A perfect engine firing placed the solar-powered spacecraft into just the right orbit around the gas giant, with the promise of great discoveries to come.

    Now, 150 days into the mission, Juno should have made six or seven close fly-bys of Jupiter (flying through the point of its orbit that is closest to the giant planet). It is at this point that the spacecraft makes most of its important scientific observations. But in reality, we have had just one science-intensive fly-by so far (in August), with another planned this month (December 11). So what happened?

    Juno was originally injected into a 53-day orbit around Jupiter. The plan was to complete two of these long orbits while all the instruments were being checked, before firing the engine again in October to move the spacecraft closer to the planet in a 14-day orbit. However, shortly before the burn, the Juno team reported that two helium valves—which play a vital role in firing the main engine —weren’t operating properly. So instead of risking the spacecraft by firing the engine, the team decided to wait and analyze the issue in more depth. It’s always better having a healthy, working spacecraft than an uncontrollable one.

    That’s not to say that Juno will never reach the 14-day orbit, but we now expect to stay in this 53-day orbit for at least the first half of 2017. But if we can’t figure out what’s going on with the valves, we could stay in this orbit indefinitely, as Juno doesn’t get any extra radiation exposure by doing this.

    From a science perspective, this change just means we’ll be taking data more slowly—with 53 days between each fly-by rather than 14. Juno will still achieve its full scientific potential, but we scientists will have to be more patient than we’d originally planned, as well as reworking all our carefully laid plans for Earth-based support.

  19. #79
    Quick question. Since Juno looks like it will be in a 53-day instead of 14-day orbit, could this mean that the mission itself could be extended?
    Just a layman's guess, but IIRC, one of the factors which determined Juno's useful lifespan was the radiation it encountered with each pass. Would the extended duration of each orbit mean a slightly longer lifespan?
    Cheers!

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    Funding for JUNO has already been guaranteed for the primary mission that goes until February 2018, so longer orbits don't mean a longer primary mission. No budget means no more mission. In fact, the spacecraft is supposed to deorbit into Jupiter in 2018, so that complicates things.

    Extended missions are possible but not not automatic (especially for missions like JUNO that have a planned end date). There is a very lengthy proposal and review process, and there must be a very compelling reason to extend the mission. Basically, the mission teams must show that they 1) have completed their primary mission goals and 2) have new goals that can only be reached with new data.

    It is far too early to guess if NASA will approve a change in plan.
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  21. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by slaver0110 View Post
    Quick question. Since Juno looks like it will be in a 53-day instead of 14-day orbit, could this mean that the mission itself could be extended?
    Just a layman's guess, but IIRC, one of the factors which determined Juno's useful lifespan was the radiation it encountered with each pass. Would the extended duration of each orbit mean a slightly longer lifespan?
    Cheers!
    selvaarchi's post answers this (emphasis mine):

    ut if we can’t figure out what’s going on with the valves, we could stay in this orbit indefinitely, as Juno doesn’t get any extra radiation exposure by doing this.

  22. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    Funding for JUNO has already been guaranteed for the primary mission that goes until February 2018, so longer orbits don't mean a longer primary mission. No budget means no more mission. In fact, the spacecraft is supposed to deorbit into Jupiter in 2018, so that complicates things.

    Extended missions are possible but not not automatic (especially for missions like JUNO that have a planned end date). There is a very lengthy proposal and review process, and there must be a very compelling reason to extend the mission. Basically, the mission teams must show that they 1) have completed their primary mission goals and 2) have new goals that can only be reached with new data.

    It is far too early to guess if NASA will approve a change in plan.
    I would guess that if they couldn't enter the 14 day orbit and they could potentially stay longer in the 53 day orbit then they could go into a senior review after the primary mission period and propose for an extended mission. Of course, that would likely come at the expense of another mission given that Juno was not expected to live beyond its primary mission, but it could be justified depending on the science it could produce in the longer orbit.

  23. #83
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    That's the situation.

    If they can still get their science in this phase with this orbit, then an extended mission may not be likely.
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    Has anyone seen when they will attempt the helium valves again?

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    The Juno team are getting ready for the December 11th flyby.

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.ph...s.xml&rst=6695

    On Sunday, December 11, at 9:04 a.m. PST (12:04 p.m. EST, 17:04 UTC) NASA's Juno spacecraft will make its third science flyby of Jupiter.

    At the time of closest approach (called perijove), Juno will be about 2,580 miles (4,150 kilometers) above the gas giant's roiling cloud tops and traveling at a speed of about 129,000 mph (57.8 kilometers per second) relative to the planet. Seven of Juno's eight science instruments will be energized and collecting data during the flyby.

    "This will be the first time we are planning to operate the full Juno capability to investigate Jupiter's interior structure via its gravity field," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "We are looking forward to what Jupiter's gravity may reveal about the gas giant's past and its future."

    Mission managers have decided not to collect data with the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument during the December flyby, to allow the team to complete an update to the spacecraft software that processes JIRAM's science data. A software patch allowing JIRAM's operation is expected to be available prior to the next perijove pass (PJ4) on Feb. 2, 2017.

  26. #86
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    They have done the flyby successfully and collected the data. One of the new photos taken shows the seventh of eight pearls around Jupiter’s southern hemisphere.

    http://spaceflight101.com/juno-deliv...er-evaluation/

    NASA’s Juno spacecraft brushed past Jupiter on Sunday, marking the mission’s first operational science data collection with seven of the craft’s instruments active as the probe zipped past the Gas Giant at a speed over 200,000 Kilometers per hour.

    Sunday’s close pass, known as Perijove, represented Juno’s third encounter with Jupiter after entering a highly elongated orbit around the planet back on July 4 following a five-year odyssey through the solar system. The first close orbital pass on August 27 was dedicated to a checkout of the spacecraft’s instrument suite and, in addition to valuable science data, delivered the first photos of Jupiter from Juno’s unique vantage point in polar orbit.

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  27. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Has anyone seen when they will attempt the helium valves again?
    From my last post, it sounds like they will only do it if they choose option 2.

    "Three options exist for the future of the Juno mission: 1) keeping the spacecraft in its current orbit with science passes every 53.5 days, 2) firing the main engine for a full or partial period reduction to increase the frequency of science passes, 3) employing the monopropellant reaction control system to accomplish a partial period reduction to avoid the risk of firing the main engine, though at the expense of maneuvering propellant that could be useful in an extended mission."

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    New photo of Jupiter done by a citizen scientist from data taken by Juno.

    http://www.space.com/35334-crescent-...pot-photo.html

    "Many prominent features of Jupiter are visible in the photo, including the famous Great Red Spot and its smaller companion, Oval BA. A series of round, white storms spans across this crescent view of Jupiter. In total, Jupiter currently has eight of these storms, which are known as the "string of pearls," NASA officials said."

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    You can be part of the dicission of where to point Juno's camera to take pictures of Jupiter at the next close flyby on February 2nd.

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6722

    "Where should NASA's Juno spacecraft aim its camera during its next close pass of Jupiter on Feb. 2? You can now play a part in the decision. For the first time, members of the public can vote to participate in selecting all pictures to be taken of Jupiter during a Juno flyby. Voting begins Thursday, Jan. 19 at 11 a.m. PST (2 p.m. EST) and concludes on Jan. 23 at 9 a.m. PST (noon EST).

    "We are looking forward to people visiting our website and becoming part of the JunoCam imaging team," said Candy Hansen, Juno co-investigator from the Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona. "It's up to the public to determine the best locations in Jupiter's atmosphere for JunoCam to capture during this flyby.""

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    They have decided to keep Juno in its current orbit and not risk starting the main engine.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2017...jupiter-orbit/

    "When NASA sent a series of commands to the Juno spacecraft’s main engine last October, the spacecraft did not respond properly: two helium check valves that play an important role in its firing opened sluggishly. Those commands had been sent in preparation for a burn of the spacecraft’s Leros 1b engine, which would have brought Juno—a $1.1 billion mission to glean insights about Jupiter—into a significantly shorter orbital period around the gas giant.

    Due to concerns about the engine, NASA held off on a “period reduction maneuver” that would shorten Juno’s orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days. When the next chance to do so came in December, again NASA held off. Now the space agency has made it official—Juno will remain in a longer, looping orbit around Jupiter for the extent of its lifetime observing the gas giant."

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