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Thread: Yet another 'What should I read next' thread.

  1. #31
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    Yeah, professing to admire a ponderous feminist allegory because it has naked chicks in it does have a certain chutzpah.

    Grant Hutchison

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yeah, professing to admire a ponderous feminist allegory because it has naked chicks in it does have a certain chutzpah.

    Grant Hutchison
    Are we back to Heinlein?
    My travel blog Mostly about riding a motorcycle across the US and Europe. Also has cool things that happen in between.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    Are we back to Heinlein?

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    I'm not sure I know what you mean.
    Sorry, not woo. Been a while since I scanned the story summary.

    It seems like social fiction that's set in the future. Is there any ambient tension that isn't ... relationship-based?

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Just reading the premise makes me both want to have nothing to do with it and to find out how "...they resist nonviolently because they refuse to believe in power. Thus, the Sharers can never be subdued by force." (Yes, this is Wikipedia, Grant, but I think in this case it's probably safe). That seems to make no sense. You can choose not to believe someone can punch you in the face, but the fist will still hurt you when it breaks your nose.

    I guess I'm intrigued, but not expecting much.

    As for Le Guin, I think I may have read one of her books, but it was so long ago, I can't remember. I thought she was generally well received?

    CJSF
    Generally, LeGuin is considered one of the greats.

    Also, try Octavia Butler.
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Sorry, not woo. Been a while since I scanned the story summary.

    It seems like social fiction that's set in the future. Is there any ambient tension that isn't ... relationship-based?
    It's a first contact story. The tension is the first contact, and that pushes the entire story. Our protagonist is trying to win over a planet of people, and they are more than skeptical. Of course some characters are friendly and others not, but what kind of story would it be without that?
    My travel blog Mostly about riding a motorcycle across the US and Europe. Also has cool things that happen in between.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Sorry, not woo. Been a while since I scanned the story summary.

    It seems like social fiction that's set in the future. Is there any ambient tension that isn't ... relationship-based?
    What other kind of tension is there? Stories without relationships are, well, kind of like The Little Engine That Could, writ large
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post


    What other kind of tension is there? Stories without relationships are, well, kind of like The Little Engine That Could, writ large
    Well, there's tension driven by external circumstances.

    (I didn't mean no relationships, just not the entirety of a story.)

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Well, there's tension driven by external circumstances.

    (I didn't mean no relationships, just not the entirety of a story.)
    Since you asked, the first contact planet is an ice world, and the environment itself is a huge tension, which leads up to the climatic ending.
    My travel blog Mostly about riding a motorcycle across the US and Europe. Also has cool things that happen in between.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    Since you asked, the first contact planet is an ice world, and the environment itself is a huge tension, which leads up to the climatic ending.
    The other tension is that Le Guin's stories in this sequence have no FTL travel.

    As an aside, David Brin's Glory Season has many broad similarities to Le Guin's Left Hand of Darkness.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  11. #41
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    Is it worth reading?
    My travel blog Mostly about riding a motorcycle across the US and Europe. Also has cool things that happen in between.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    Is it worth reading?
    Glory Road? Yes. Left Hand of Darkness? Absolutely.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  13. #43
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    If you can find copies then try Eric Frank Russell

  14. 2017-Apr-12, 01:13 AM

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