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Thread: Total Solar Eclipse - August 21, 2017

  1. #121
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    Cool Carbondale, Illinois

    Interestingly, both the Total Solar Eclipse paths of 2017 AUG 21 and 2024 APR 08 will include Carbondale, Illinois the home of Southern Illinois University. Carbondale will be virtually at the point of maximum duration of totality (2:39 min) for the 2017 eclipse, yet the duration (4:09 min) will be even longer there in 2024.
    For astronomical graphics and data visit
    CurtRenz.com/astronomy.html

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trantor View Post
    Thank You. Nice interactive map and love the zoom. Man, I can so see myself on Millennium Force, my favorite roller coaster in the world, during the eclipse. Of course, most likely, I will be waiting in that long line!!!
    My wife, from Marietta, OH, considers it to be the best rollercoaster park in the world. If the rollercoaster line is long, as usual, and the totality time is only about 3-1/2 minutes (for Cedar Point), then you should only miss going up and down on the ride during totality by about one hour.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centaur View Post
    Interestingly, both the Total Solar Eclipse paths of 2017 AUG 21 and 2024 APR 08 will include Carbondale, Illinois the home of Southern Illinois University. Carbondale will be virtually at the point of maximum duration of totality (2:39 min) for the 2017 eclipse, yet the duration (4:09 min) will be even longer there in 2024.
    The path width for 2024 is about 120 miles, almost double that of this eclipse (~70 miles). The Moon, no doubt, will be closer to Earth (near perigee) and appear larger than average. The Sun, in April, is actually closer to Earth (perihelion in early Jan.) than in August, so the larger Sun would make for a smaller path than this one if the lunar distances were the same.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  4. #124
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    We're only getting 80% here, but I have my glasses and should be able step outside.
    Maybe we'll try for seeing totality in 2024.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    I see from the daily SOHO observations that sunspot activity is presently minimal, at least it is so on the visible side right now. There is one spot presently visible now (#2670) but it will be on the far side as the sun rotates by eclipse time. Is there any way to know or a way to tell how the far side of the sun is looking now as far any sunspot activity goes? Just curious as I'm hoping that spots on the far side today will be located on the edge of the solar disk by the 21st for some good solar flare activity during totality.
    SOHO : https://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/sunspots/
    FWIW the STEREO A spacecraft (ahead) seems to show a sunspot which might be on or near the sun's limb at the time of the eclipse in six days. In the linked image the spot on the right has already rotated around and can be seen from Earth. The spot on the left is the one I'm referencing.

    ETA: Well, maybe not. I just looked at an MPG video which captured about 19 hours of imaging and the spot may be rotating around faster than thought.
    Last edited by schlaugh; Yesterday at 08:54 PM.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I was watching the NBC nightly news yesterday, and they had a short segment about counterfeit solar viewing glasses.
    The reporter said that you can tell if your glasses are legit if you look at the sun and see nothing until the moon moves completely in front of the disk.

    How could a major news organization get it so wrong?
    One of our local talking heads (I think, it could have been someone on Good Morning America) said something about needing "extra dark sunglasses". At the end of a story about fake eclipse glasses.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    One of our local talking heads (I think, it could have been someone on Good Morning America) said something about needing "extra dark sunglasses". At the end of a story about fake eclipse glasses.
    Sad.

    I just learned that there is a museum in our state that has proper (I assume) eclipse glasses and telescopes set-up for the eclipse viewing to accommodate all the schools they invited. Many schools, however, have asked them to reschedule the event since that happens to be the first day of school.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    The path width for 2024 is about 120 miles, almost double that of this eclipse (~70 miles). The Moon, no doubt, will be closer to Earth (near perigee) and appear larger than average. The Sun, in April, is actually closer to Earth (perihelion in early Jan.) than in August, so the larger Sun would make for a smaller path than this one if the lunar distances were the same.
    Here's a simulation that shows how the sizes of the Sun and Moon change over time as viewed from the center of the Earth.

    Notice how difficult it is to get a total eclipse in December or January.

    Simulation (runs in your browser): http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySim...nMoonSize.html

  9. #129
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    Anyone going to be in the St. Joe State park Farmington Mo. area for the eclipse?

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    We're only getting 80% here, but I have my glasses and should be able step outside.
    Maybe we'll try for seeing totality in 2024.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Same, except in New York it's 70-something percent. Still, it will be cool to see through the glasses.

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centaur View Post
    Interestingly, both the Total Solar Eclipse paths of 2017 AUG 21 and 2024 APR 08 will include Carbondale, Illinois the home of Southern Illinois University. Carbondale will be virtually at the point of maximum duration of totality (2:39 min) for the 2017 eclipse, yet the duration (4:09 min) will be even longer there in 2024.
    NASA is going to do their show from SIU this time, don't know if they have plans for the next one yet.

  12. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    My wife, from Marietta, OH, considers it to be the best rollercoaster park in the world. If the rollercoaster line is long, as usual, and the totality time is only about 3-1/2 minutes (for Cedar Point), then you should only miss going up and down on the ride during totality by about one hour.
    If the folks at Cedar Point are smart, they will sell tickets for big $$$$ to be on their coasters at totality!

  13. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony873004 View Post
    Here's a simulation that shows how the sizes of the Sun and Moon change over time as viewed from the center of the Earth.

    Notice how difficult it is to get a total eclipse in December or January.

    Simulation (runs in your browser): http://orbitsimulator.com/gravitySim...nMoonSize.html
    Nice.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  14. #134
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    Eclipse clouds.jpg

    Gallatin is holding at 20% chance of rain, though Tuesday has gone up to 40%, up from 20% (14th).

    Upstream... Princeton, KY, has been bumped from 30% over the last week to 40%.
    Downstream... Dayton, TN, has dropped since one week ago at 60% to 30% (14th) to 20%.
    Last edited by George; Today at 09:36 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by pumpkinpie View Post
    If the folks at Cedar Point are smart, they will sell tickets for big $$$$ to be on their coasters at totality!
    Yes, that probably would have happened... Unfortunately, I have bad news for people like me, who would have paid extra to ride a coaster during totality. This thread got me interested in the 2024 ecplise and Cedar Point, so I checked the park's hours. Cedar Point opens in May. The eclipse is on April 8th. Sad.

    Living in Central Florida, sometimes I forget that it's still cold in the Northern States in April. Heck, we get temperatures in the 90's on some days in April. Here the big Amusement Parks stay open all year long.

    I did see something that really interested me while on the Cedar Point site. A massive wood/metal hybrid roller coaster that towers over the trees. It's opening in 2018!!! I got to ride that. Looks like me and the wife will be making another trip to Cedar Point very soon...

    Just a few more days until the eclipse!!!

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