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Thread: A terabyte

  1. #1
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    A terabyte

    Suppose I want to buy one terabyte of portable memory I can fill up.
    What options would I have? How much would they cost? Would they be portable or luggable?

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    There are wallet-sized terabyte drives available for under $100. Very portable.

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    Many. Google: terabyte portable drive

    Dirt cheap, too.

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    Soon the storage will become so large and the drive so small that if you fill it up it will collapse into a black hole and make all your information irretrievable.

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    My 2Tb drive cost about $150. But that was in the stone age. About 2 years ago.

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    Kingston do a 1TB (and in fact a 2TB version) USB stick. SanDisk have done a prototype 1TB SD card for cameras/phones, but I am not sure that it is on sale yet.

    So given that one is the size of your thumb and one an inch or so square they would strike me as very portable!

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    Whatever happened to HVD...that was supposed to be multiple TBs on a disc.

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    Remember when 1 GB was a huge amount of storage?

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    Awasome

    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Remember when 1 GB was a huge amount of storage?
    All to well. Circa 1990. Up 3 orders of magnitude in approx 30 years. Will we be at 1,000 GB by the late 2040's?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Whatever happened to HVD...that was supposed to be multiple TBs on a disc.
    They built it on a fragile, awkward form factor, and there hasn't been a demand for cheaply manufacturable multi-terabyte distribution media. They'd have been better off using the technology for ruggedized, fully featured pocket-sized HD media, but even that has been becoming obsolete due to the availability of streamed content. For those cases where it is needed, hard drives and solid state storage can already do the job, and typically do it better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Remember when 1 GB was a huge amount of storage?
    I remember when 10MB was a lot of storage. I used Bernoulli boxes back in the 1980s.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaula View Post
    Kingston do a 1TB (and in fact a 2TB version) USB stick. SanDisk have done a prototype 1TB SD card for cameras/phones, but I am not sure that it is on sale yet.

    So given that one is the size of your thumb and one an inch or so square they would strike me as very portable!
    I was surprised to see that the new phones I bought about 6 months or so ago could take up to 1 TB micro SD cards. Upon investigating I couldn't find any 1 TB cards but did find up to 256 GB ones. Apparently they were simply planning for the near future. The previous phone I bought, less than two years ago, I put a 16 GB card in, the maximum it could accommodate, and thought it was great I could fit all of my music on it. A terabyte on a phone size device is . . . amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I remember when 10MB was a lot of storage.
    Likewise. I used to have my operating system on one 360K floppy, and my data on another. When I got a 20MB hard drive, I could practically hear the echo from that vast empty space inside my PC.
    I had a 5MB Bernoulli disk for backup, and could stack several back-up sets on it before before I needed to delete the oldest.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    My 2Tb drive cost about $150. But that was in the stone age. About 2 years ago.
    $79 for 2TB ext USB3 a few months ago.

    The terabyte SSD's are still pricey Seems there's a technological challenge there since they've been around $300-$350 for a couple years now.
    Last edited by Squink; 2017-May-30 at 04:44 PM.

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    if they get those memristors working they are smaller and take less power, therefore less heat, then it's another order, or two orders more compaction. I think they consume about 100 times less power to switch. In the end it will be DNA memory.
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    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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    Could you have hydrogen memory, wherein the ortho and para varieties supply the zero and the one bits respectively? An Avogadro of bits per gram? That'd be tough to beat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Likewise. I used to have my operating system on one 360K floppy, and my data on another. When I got a 20MB hard drive, I could practically hear the echo from that vast empty space inside my PC.
    I had a 5MB Bernoulli disk for backup, and could stack several back-up sets on it before before I needed to delete the oldest.

    Grant Hutchison
    Heck,

    This is the storage media I learned to program on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Heck,

    This is the storage media I learned to program on.
    You had paper??? Luxury.
    https://previews.123rf.com/images/ke...tock-Photo.jpg
    Last edited by DaveC426913; 2017-May-30 at 06:54 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell View Post
    I put a 16 GB card in, the maximum it could accommodate, and thought it was great I could fit all of my music on it. A terabyte on a phone size device is . . . amazing.
    Haha. Just saw Guardians of the Galaxy 2 last night.

    "It's called a Zune. Very popular on Earth right now. Holds fully 300 songs at once!!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    That storage media has lasted a lot longer, in a readable form, than anything else described in this thread will.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Heck,

    This is the storage media I learned to program on.
    Punched card? Me too. And tape. Algol and Fortran.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Haha. Just saw Guardians of the Galaxy 2 last night.

    "It's called a Zune. Very popular on Earth right now. Holds fully 300 songs at once!!"
    Must've been one of the smallest ones. My Zune in '08 could hold 120 GB worth of music or video.
    Calm down, have some dip. - George Carlin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I remember when 10MB was a lot of storage. I used Bernoulli boxes back in the 1980s.
    That's what DVDs should have looked like. Don't try to take it out of a case--just house it over.

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    Godzilla vs Terrorbite could have been a 1970s film title.

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    I've used one inch wide paper tape that stored ten bytes per inch by punching holes in it. A terabyte tape would reach more than seven times the distance to the moon. That would have been expensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Heck,

    This is the storage media I learned to program on.
    Yep. The college had an IBM 360 that took these problematic babies. It also had a line printer that allowed continues feed if you accidentally snuck in a "do loop" for the paper advance code. I saw this happen several times and, the first time, it was pretty funny -- the wide format roll of paper would shoot all the way up to the ceiling because it had a very fast feed rate. But, standing in a delayed line with a box or two of cards got old pretty quick.

    These cards had 80 columns with 12 rows (a couple rows were for parity, I suppose), so each card represented 80 characters. They are 0.007" in thickness so a terabyte would have required a stack of cards 1381 miles high. Obviously, you would need to make two stacks instead.

    [Added: but we are moving into the petabyte era, so bump everything by a 1000. The SKA may generate an exabyte per day, but compressed to 10 petabytes per day.]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Jun-06 at 04:16 PM.
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    All back to looms and player pianos

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    I've used one inch wide paper tape that stored ten bytes per inch by punching holes in it. A terabyte tape would reach more than seven times the distance to the moon. That would have been expensive.
    It would have taken a teletype punching 10 bytes per second about 3484 years to punch a terabyte, so I wouldn't have had to buy all that paper tape up front.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    It would have taken a teletype punching 10 bytes per second about 3484 years to punch a terabyte, so I wouldn't have had to buy all that paper tape up front.
    Aw, just be creative:

    Code:
    BEGIN
    
    printstring(`Hello, World')
    
    'GOTO' BEGIN
    Less than 5 inches of paper and a little scotch tape.

    Of course, if you are willing to use a piece of scotch tape, you could do this on less than 2:

    Code:
    BEGIN
    
    'GOTO' BEGIN
    Personally, I'd use about 8 inches of paper and put a half twist in it before taping the ends together... just to see what happens.
    Solfe

  30. #30
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    Actually, they used to program the line skips and page feeds in the old noisy, high-speed, impact printers with a loop of punched paper tape. There was a special tape reader built into a compartment on the side of the printer.

    The default loop would specify 6 lines per inch, 66 per page (or whatever it was -- the paper was continuous fan-fold), but they could switch in a different one to get more lines at 8 per inch, or do special things, like two, three or four logical pages to a physical page. If you simply removed the loop, the printer would print one line after another without any breaks. This saved paper when you had to dump a lot of data to print.


    One time early in my programming career, I had an infinite loop in a job that I turned in. It thus printed the same page again and again. I was appalled when the operator gave me a whole box of output. He didn't scold me, however, because it was his duty to stop the job when it got carried away, and he must have been asleep at the switch. You really could tell when a job was stuck in such a loop by the repetition of the exact same printer sounds over and over.

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