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Thread: A terabyte

  1. #31
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    The paper tape used to control the line printer in the Lab where I (still) work never lasted very long. We finally replaced it by one punched out of mylar. That one lasted until we finally got rid of the printer.
    Selden

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Punched card? Me too. And tape. Algol and Fortran.

    Grant Hutchison
    Me three. One of the first computers I used (in high school) was at the headquarters of Reader's Digest. I think it was Cobol, and we used punch cards.

    The first microcomputer I used was a TRS-80, I think 16 kilobytes of memory...
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  3. #33
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    The minimal TRS-80 came with 4K of RAM but I started with 16K and immediately ordered the expansion box with another 32K. These cost me about $1800 in 1978 money. Data was stored on audio cassette tape at 500 bits per second, or 1 terabyte in about 557 years.

  4. #34
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    You had to be a really good programmer to write useful applications in one kilobyte (or less).

  5. #35
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    From online research:
    The storage capacity in Kindle 7 and Kindle 8 is the same. Itís 4 GB, and about 3 GB are available for the users.

    Why can't I have a terabyte of memory in my Kindle...or at least a few hundred GB?

  6. #36
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    I took Comp Sci 101 fall of '70 at Penn State. We accessed an IBM-360 model 70 mainframe that had 512k RAM. It took up the first floor of a building on campus.

  7. #37
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    One of my college friends had one of the very first PCs. It had 256 bytes of RAM. He also had a jar of a uranium salt in the room.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    From online research:
    The storage capacity in Kindle 7 and Kindle 8 is the same. Itís 4 GB, and about 3 GB are available for the users.

    Why can't I have a terabyte of memory in my Kindle...or at least a few hundred GB?
    There is no technical reason you can't, it would just make no sense. For it main (only?) purpose it already has more than enough storage (thousands of books), why make it many times more expensive (and also a little larger and heavier)?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by glappkaeft View Post
    There is no technical reason you can't, it would just make no sense. For it main (only?) purpose it already has more than enough storage (thousands of books), why make it many times more expensive (and also a little larger and heavier)?
    Some people just like to own more electronic books than they can ever read - amassing them seems to become an end in itself. I don't know why.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #40
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    May also depend where they get the books.

    A few months back I bought some e-books via Humble Bundle. (A bunch of Make magazine collections; electronics and stuff.)

    Most of these came as PDF, and have a bunch of images in them; loading them into my Kindle via the correct means, it was soon "full" - and it wasn't hundreds let alone thousands of books.

    Not an issue really as I can delete (off the Kindle) read books and load unread books any time. But still, at that point I too wished for more storage.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  11. #41
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    Does your kindle not have SD card? 128GB cards are cheap. Have they crippled the reader so as to not work with them?
    Best to keep the technical stuff on a computer anyway, as Adobe Reader's search function is worlds more useful than any reader search function I've seen.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    You had to be a really good programmer to write useful applications in one kilobyte (or less).
    Quite easy.

    10 PRINT "Hello, world!"
    20 END

    (I guess that depends on what you mean by useful!)
    As above, so below

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by billslugg View Post
    I took Comp Sci 101 fall of '70 at Penn State. We accessed an IBM-360 model 70 mainframe that had 512k RAM. It took up the first floor of a building on campus.
    When I was in high school there was a program where we could use a mainframe (I think it was probably a 360 or 370?) at IBM's Thomas Watson research center. I think they taught us APL or PL1, and afterwards the lectures we got to use the computer from the terminal room. Most of us spend most of our time playing a couple of games. If I remember correctly, one was Eliza, one was some kind of dungeon game, and one (the only one that had primitive graphics) was some kind of star trek starship fighting game.
    As above, so below

  14. #44
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    Anybody remember the Illiac IV? One terabyte of storage.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Quite easy.

    10 PRINT "Hello, world!"
    20 END

    (I guess that depends on what you mean by useful!)
    Okay, "useful" might be to ask the user's name, and year of birth, and compute the age and display it along with the name. "Hello, Melvin, you must be 12, you little so-and-so."
    Then, with a mighty if/then statement, if the user responded "1732", pronounce him or her probably deceased. I've done that one on the spot. But there goes your kilobyte of RAM!

    Now, try writing a rudimentary text processor ... or the classic Lunar Lander. It's tight!

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    ... and one (the only one that had primitive graphics) was some kind of star trek starship fighting game.
    A version of this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek_(text_game)

    (A few years back I found a C# port of it, so re-wrote it to run on my iPaq PDA. Killed a few lunch hours, and was surprisingly fun.)

    It was one of the first games I played, on a Pr1me minicomputer (1981-1982?) at a horticultural research centre (my parents worked at). Also played a lunar lander game (All text. Choose how much fuel to burn each "turn", don't run out of fuel, don't hit the moon too hard). And a port of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure (which may be the "dungeon" you mention).
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    A version of this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek_(text_game)

    (A few years back I found a C# port of it, so re-wrote it to run on my iPaq PDA. Killed a few lunch hours, and was surprisingly fun.)

    It was one of the first games I played, on a Pr1me minicomputer (1981-1982?) at a horticultural research centre (my parents worked at). Also played a lunar lander game (All text. Choose how much fuel to burn each "turn", don't run out of fuel, don't hit the moon too hard). And a port of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure (which may be the "dungeon" you mention).
    The Star Trek game was different. I looked it up and I think it was probably decwars, because it was multiplayer. But the adventure game, yeah that's the one, though I think we called it Adventure. And I remember the lunar lander as well.
    As above, so below

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    The Star Trek game was different. I looked it up and I think it was probably decwars, because it was multiplayer. But the adventure game, yeah that's the one, though I think we called it Adventure. And I remember the lunar lander as well.
    I think the Rochester Museum of Play still has a lunar lander game. No promises, it's been a while since I was there.
    Solfe

  19. #49
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    There was a Lunar Lander on the old TI-58/59 calculators, which only had 480 memory registers max, if i remember correctly.
    Last edited by DonM435; 2017-Jun-13 at 01:00 PM. Reason: 58/59, not 59/59

  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    There was a Lunar Lander on the old TI-59/59 calculators, which only had 480 memory registers max, if i remember correctly.
    I was going to mention that. You fed strips of "tape" into the calculator to program it. I played that game on my father's calculator back in the early '70s.

  21. #51
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    You can play a recreation of the classic lunar lander here. And a pretty nice 3D version (squeezed into 5K) here.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    When I was in high school there was a program where we could use a mainframe (I think it was probably a 360 or 370?) at IBM's Thomas Watson research center. I think they taught us APL or PL1, and afterwards the lectures we got to use the computer from the terminal room. Most of us spend most of our time playing a couple of games. If I remember correctly, one was Eliza, one was some kind of dungeon game, and one (the only one that had primitive graphics) was some kind of star trek starship fighting game.
    If they taught APL, you would remember, in the same way one might remember a root canal without anaesthetic.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    If they taught APL, you would remember, in the same way one might remember a root canal without anaesthetic.
    Well, yes, but you got to type in the entire code that ran the program on one line with 900 characters overtyped upon one another.

  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    If they taught APL, you would remember, in the same way one might remember a root canal without anaesthetic.
    Actually, I recently (honestly!) got a root canal without anaesthetic. It wasn't bad at all, as the root was already dead...

    I think that APL had a lot of symbols. But I don't remember it being that painful, maybe I just wasn't paying attention.
    As above, so below

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Actually, I recently (honestly!) got a root canal without anaesthetic. It wasn't bad at all, as the root was already dead...

    I think that APL had a lot of symbols. But I don't remember it being that painful, maybe I just wasn't paying attention.
    It's been described as a write-once language, i.e., if a program doesn't work, don't try to fix it. Just start over.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squink View Post
    Does your kindle not have SD card? 128GB cards are cheap. Have they crippled the reader so as to not work with them?
    Best to keep the technical stuff on a computer anyway, as Adobe Reader's search function is worlds more useful than any reader search function I've seen.
    Missed this before: it's a Kindle 4, 2GB and not expandable. It's old now, but a great device that I really have no complaint about. If i were just putting normal e-Books on it it'd store plenty (and I don't need to keep an already-read book on it anyway).

    Sure, I have the technical stuff on my PC too. I've been loading these books on the Kindle not for reference but to just read through cover to cover to learn stuff. My PC is not near my bed. As I read them I delete them off the Kindle. They are still on my PC.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  27. #57
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    Now that it is a quarter of a decade later, any change?
    How big would a 1 TB drive be?A hardcover book? A paperback book? A candy bar? A pack of chewing gum?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Now that it is a quarter of a decade later, any change?
    How big would a 1 TB drive be?A hardcover book? A paperback book? A candy bar? A pack of chewing gum?
    I see some 1 TB Micro SD cards on Amazon for ~$400 (USA), so those are out there now. I see the SSDs have come down to about $150.

    CJSF
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  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Now that it is a quarter of a decade later, any change?
    How big would a 1 TB drive be?A hardcover book? A paperback book? A candy bar? A pack of chewing gum?
    At this point, you can just walk into your local computer store and find this out for yourself. Candy bar, easily. Depends how much you want to pay.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #60
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    I got a 2TB drive for Christmas. It's smaller than my wallet and cost less than the money inside. About $45, IIRC.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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