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Thread: 'Very Peculiar' Signals from Ross 128

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    'Very Peculiar' Signals from Ross 128

    Prof. Abel Mendez reports the reception of what he calls 'very peculiar' signals from the nearby star Ross 128, distant about 11 light years. The signals were first heard in May, and Prof Mendez will listen for them again, today, at Arecibo. He suggests that type II stellar flares may be responsible, but there are serious problems with this explanation. Mendez concedes that extraterrestrial intelligence, while a very long shot, can not be ruled out at this time. Link to further information, below:

    phl.upr.edu/library/notes/ross128
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2017-Jul-16 at 03:57 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    Mendez concedes that extraterrestrial intelligence, while a very long shot, can not be ruled out at this time.
    He actually writes: "In case you are wondering, the recurrent aliens hypothesis is at the bottom of many other better explanations."

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    Prof. Abel Mendez reports the reception of what he calls 'very peculiar' signals from the nearby star Ross 128, distant about 11 light years.
    I'm sorry, this is probably a silly question, but why is Ross 54 writing about Ross 128? Are you relatives or something? Or did one of you discover the other?
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Just as one would expect it to be. It's a widely admitted scientific practice to save extraterrestrial intelligence as an explanatory 'last resort'.
    We have no idea how common intelligence is in the galaxy, nor when we might encounter it. If we use the standard of how well the evidence agrees with a hypothesis, there is room for doubting the natural explanation is this case.

    The preferred natural explanation here is type II stellar flares. Prof. Mendez notes that these are expected to occur on a lower radio frequency than the range he was monitoring. In addition, type II flares are reported to be rather narrow in bandwidth. Prof. Mendez' 'very peculiar signal' was conspicuously broad-banded. Also-- Type II flares are relatively rare, thought to occur at the rate of about one in a period of tens of hours. Prof. Mendez reported a number of impulses in the space of only 10 minutes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm sorry, this is probably a silly question, but why is Ross 54 writing about Ross 128? Are you relatives or something? Or did one of you discover the other?
    Merely a coincidence it seems. To the best of my knowledge, I am not a relative of astronomer Frank Elmore Ross, who had a number of stars to his name, which he discovered. 'Ross 54' signifies my middle name, and the year I was born.
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2017-Jul-16 at 07:49 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Just as one would expect it to be.
    Yes indeed. That's why I felt it might be useful to copy across Mendez's own words on the topic.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    Merely a coincidence it seems. To the best of my knowledge, I am not a relative of astronomer Frank Elmore Ross, who had a number of stars to his name, which he discovered. 'Ross 54' signifies my middle name, and the year I was born.
    Here is your entry in the Ross catalogue.

    Grant Hutchison

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    So, what are the characteristics of this signal?

    I read it exhibits dispersion meaning it may have come from deep space simply in the same direction as Ross 128.

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    There's some discussion of the observations in
    https://www.universetoday.com/136492...nearby-star-1/

    My reading of it is that all of the "obvious" explanations have serious flaws.
    Selden

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    Until I hear "repeating primes" I just tune that noise out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Until I hear "repeating primes" I just tune that noise out.
    When they get up to 257,885,161-1 then we'll be in business.
    Formerly Frog march..............

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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Until I hear "repeating primes" I just tune that noise out.
    Machine: "5.... 7... 11... 13... 17... 19... 23..."
    Scientist 1: "Isn't that incredible?"
    Scientist 2: "Let's see if it repeats!"
    Scientist 1: "Trust me, when you hear it again, it will blow your mind."
    Machine: "0... 1... 3... 5.... 7... 11... 13... 17... 19... 23..."
    Scientist 2: "Ack! They're stupid or something!"
    Scientist 1: "Mind blowing, isn't it."
    Solfe, Dominus Maris Pavos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by selden View Post
    My reading of it is that all of the "obvious" explanations have serious flaws.
    They've concluded that it is most likely a signal from an artificial source (geostationary satellites).
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by selden View Post
    There's some discussion of the observations in
    https://www.universetoday.com/136492...nearby-star-1/

    My reading of it is that all of the "obvious" explanations have serious flaws.
    It is interesting as the author lists a bunch of Earthly things that can cause weird signals. Now I am curious about that list because I know nothing of the items the author listed as if they were common place:

    “[T]hey could be {SNIP} (3) burst from a high orbit satellite since low orbit satellites are quick to move out of the field of view. The signals are probably too dim for other radio telescopes in the world and FAST is currently under calibration.”
    What is FAST?
    Solfe, Dominus Maris Pavos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    It is interesting as the author lists a bunch of Earthly things that can cause weird signals. Now I am curious about that list because I know nothing of the items the author listed as if they were common place:



    What is FAST?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_h...ical_Telescope
    Formerly Frog march..............

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frog march View Post
    When they get up to 257,885,161-1 then we'll be in business.
    JOOC, why not 274,207,281-1?

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    Quote Originally Posted by grapes View Post
    JOOC, why not 274,207,281-1?
    it just came up in Google as the highest prime number found.! Must be out of date...
    Formerly Frog march..............

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    Huh. So it does!

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    Pulsars may be intelligent after all...
    Formerly Frog march..............

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    Merely a coincidence it seems. To the best of my knowledge, I am not a relative of astronomer Frank Elmore Ross, who had a number of stars to his name, which he discovered. 'Ross 54' signifies my middle name, and the year I was born.
    Your middle name is 54?

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Your middle name is 54?
    I guess you just misread it. His middle name is Ross and he was born in 1954.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I guess you just misread it. His middle name is Ross and he was born in 1954.
    Aah...I thought "Ross" was his first name

    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Aah...I thought "Ross" was his first name
    No--that's his last name.

    "You know me, I gotta put in a big tree with some Van Dyke Brown...swoosh..nice pulsar."

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    As usual.

    ROSS 128: SCIENTISTS SOLVE MYSTERY OF RADIO SIGNALS COMING FROM NEARBY STAR

    The researchers further analyzed the signal, and have determined that it most likely came from one or more geostationary satellites. “This explains why the signals were within the satellite’s frequencies and only appeared and persisted in Ross 128; the star is close to the celestial equator where many geostationary satellites are placed,” Méndez writes in a new post.
    Press release: The Weird! Signal

    Nearly 800 people participated in this informal survey (including more than 60 astronomers); the consensus was that the most likely explanation was either (1) or (2), namely an astronomical phenomenon (see figure below). Causes related to radio interference or instrumental failures were considered most unlikely. This is interesting since in the absence of solid information about the signal, most astronomers would think that these would probably be the most likely explanation.
    Think.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Critique your own ATM idea.

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    Formerly Frog march..............

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    You might have missed post #13.
    As above, so below

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    Or I might not have, and I wanted to provide some citations.

    I'm funny that way. It probably comes from knowing some members decline to look it up themselves.

    Also, I thought the poll aspect had a little value toward promoting critical thinking.

    Sorry if you wanted a quote for credit.
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...
    Critique your own ATM idea.

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    The SETI Institute still seems interested in Ross 128, despite the supposed solution of the signal. Their Allen Telescope Array is currently scrutinizing that star, also known as FI Virginis, GJ 447, and HIP 57548. They have been looking at it since at least 20 hours GMT, when I happened to learn of it.

    At one point, the display indicated 'ON 2' status, which means that a signal was detected, then tested by de-aiming the antenna, and losing the signal, then rearming, and receiving the signal again. Time as I write this: 22:20 GMT. Their work can be viewed at:
    www.setiquest.info
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2017-Jul-23 at 10:24 PM.

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    Newsweek's headline says "Scientists solve mystery of radio signals", but you read the fine print, that isn't quite what the scientists actually said.

    “...the signals were within the satellite’s frequencies and only appeared and persisted in Ross 128; the star is close to the celestial equator where many geostationary satellites are placed,” Méndez writes in a new post. “This fact, though, does not yet explain the strong dispersion-like features of the signals (diagonal lines in the figure); however, It is possible that multiple reflections caused these distortions, but we will need more time to explore this and other possibilities.” (italics added)

    In short, they're still working on it.

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    Yes, they are undoubtedly still working on it. The geostationary satellite hypothesis was called the most likely explanation. It does not, at least at present, satisfactorily explain all the data. It requires further testing of its validity.

    Random, multiple reflections of radio waves accurately reproducing the frequency dependent dispersion phenomenon seems quite improbable. How would these be able to organize themselves into a consistent, systematic arrangement of delay times, in proportion to the various radio frequencies?
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2017-Jul-24 at 01:04 AM.

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