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Thread: Small Rocket Launches

  1. #61
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    "Arianespace Vega mission to perform Small Spacecraft Mission Service Proof of Concept flight"

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A...light_999.html

    With this mission, designated Flight VV16, Arianespace underscores its comprehensive range of innovative and competitive services to address the nano- and micro-satellite market sub-segment, serving both institutional and commercial needs. The creation of such a new service using the company's light-lift Vega led to the Small Spacecraft Mission Service (SSMS) project.

    The European Space Agency (ESA) funded the SSMS hardware development, and also contributed with the European Union to the funding of this "Proof of Concept" (PoC) flight.

    The combined European efforts will enhance Arianespace's response to the rideshare demand with solutions that are perfectly suited to the flourishing small satellite market.

  2. #62
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    Rocket Lab's latest flight ends in failure before reaching orbit.

    spaceflightnow
    A failure during the second stage burn of a Rocket Lab Electron rocket caused seven small commercial satellites to crash back to Earth Saturday following liftoff from New Zealand.

    Carrying satellites from the United States, Japan and the United Kingdom, the Electron launcher lifted off from Rocket Lab’s privately-run spaceport on New Zealand’s North Island at 5:19:36 p.m. EDT (2119:36 GMT).
    Scott Manley also has a video about it
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  3. #63
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    Increased competition between private companies could add many new small rocket launches, I heard about new developments from Firefly Aerospace and their rocket lab launch these rockets will clearly find their niche among other counterparts from private companies such as SpaceX.

  4. #64
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    Firefly's back in the game,

    Today we performed a test of the Alpha flight first stage. The four Reaver engines performed 35 seconds of thrust vector control maneuvers, challenging the flame deflectors to constrain all that Reaver power! Today’s test was a major step in Firefly’s march to first flight.
    https://youtu.be/Blv27FHyY4k

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valencia Benz View Post
    Increased competition between private companies could add many new small rocket launches, I heard about new developments from Firefly Aerospace and their rocket lab launch these rockets will clearly find their niche among other counterparts from private companies such as SpaceX.
    I recently linked this in another thread, it's relevant here:
    https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_chr/lau2020.htm

    Even excluding Starlink and OneWeb, almost all of the small satellites were launched on rideshares.

    Small launchers are good if you need some oddball orbit, but you generally don't. If you want to go to a given orbit, there's probably other people who want a similar destination. In most cases, all you want is some solar-synchronous or high-inclination orbit. Smallsat launchers are fighting over the scraps of the market that are left by the rideshares on larger rockets, and there probably isn't enough business for more than a couple companies, and Rocket Lab probably has as good an advantage in that part of the market as SpaceX does in the rest. Rocket Lab's already reconsidered their early position on reuse and are working on booster recovery, Firefly's going to have a tough time competing with them.

  6. #66
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    "ISRO plans to launch new rocket before Dec 2020"

    https://gulfnews.com/world/asia/indi....1601982314549

    The Indian space agency is working towards launching its new rocket 'Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV)' before December 2020, said a senior official.

    He also said necessary tests to check its biggest motor -- booster motor fired by solid fuel -- will be done in November.

    "The SSLV launch will be from the first launch pad at Sriharikota rocket port after the flight of Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle C49 (PSLV C49). Post PSLV C49's flight, the launch pad set up has to be reconfigured to suit SSLV," S. Somanath, Director, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) part of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) told IANS.

  7. #67
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    "Large launch companies cast doubt on viability of small launch vehicle market"

    https://spacenews.com/large-launch-c...ehicle-market/

    Executives of major launch companies said they doubted there was sufficient demand for more than a few small launch vehicle developers, citing their own efforts to provide rideshare launch services for smallsats.

    During a panel discussion at Euroconsult’s World Satellite Business Week Virtual Edition conference Nov. 9, Tory Bruno, chief executive and president of United Launch Alliance, said a year ago he was tracking more than 120 ventures in the small launch vehicle or “microlauncher” market. There is now a “significantly smaller” number of such companies, he said, because of fundraising challenges linked to the pandemic.

    “I don’t expect that market to recover because that market would have been grossly — like order of magnitude — oversupplied had all of those startups succeeded,” he said. “There’s really only room, in our judgment, for maybe two or three of these.”

  8. #68
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    "Will small rockets finally lift off"

    https://www.spacedaily.com/reports/W...t_off_999.html

    The boom in demand for placing small satellites into orbit has boosted interest in small rockets, but industry players do not think the niche will become a business segment of its own.

    "This time last year, we were able to count over 120 startups for microlaunchers, small rockets that would carry a single small satellite. As we look today, there is a significantly smaller number of those," said Tory Bruno, CEO of Boeing-Lockheed Martin joint venture United Launch Alliance (ULA), said at a recent industry gathering.

    The frenzy of proposals for small rockets, or microlaunchers, comes as new satellite-based phone and internet networks are shifting away from a few satellites in high, geostationary orbits.

    Instead they use constellations of many, small satellites placed in low earth orbits (LEO).

  9. #69
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    Black Brant suborbital mission recovered by water splashdown. Color photos and diagrams, very nice.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.10072

    REX: X-ray experiment on the Water Recovery Rocket

    Martin Urban, Ondrej Nentvich, Tomas Baca, Ivo Vertat, Veronika Marsikova, Daniela Doubravova, Vladimir Daniel, Adolf Inneman, Ladisla Pina, Randall L. McEntaffer, Ted B. Schultz, Drew M. Miles, James H. Tutt

    This paper presents Rocket Experiment (REX) that was part of a dual payload rocket campaign for NASA's sounding rocket Black Brant IX with water recovery technology. This mission was a suborbital sounding rocket flight that was launched and recovered on April 4, 2018 and targeted the Vela supernova remnant. The purpose of REX was to classify the Technology Readiness Level of onboard devices designed for space applications. The devices were two wide-field X-ray telescopes consisting of a combination of Lobster-Eye (LE) optics with an uncooled Timepix detector (256 x 256 px @ 55 um), and additional sensors. The first telescope uses a two-dimensional combination of LE modules with a focal length of 1 m and a Field of View (FOV) of 1.0 x 1.2 deg and operates in the energy range of 3 - 60 keV. The second telescope was a one-dimensional LE with a focal length of 250 mm and a FOV of 2.7 x 8.0 deg for the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The X-ray telescopes were supplemented by a camera in the visible spectrum with 1,280 x 1,024 px resolution, which was used to obtain images of the observed sources and to verify the resulting pointing of the rocket carrier. Other devices also include infrared array sensors and inertial measurement units tested for future small satellite missions. The data handler and communication system were built using the Robot Operating System, and both the system and the electronics were deployed and operated in flight. The hardware was successfully recovered after the launch and the data were extracted.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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