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Thread: The ULTIMATE Astronomy Quiz 2

  1. #31
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    A) Betelgeuse?
    B) ALMA?
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    A) Betelgeuse?
    B) ALMA?
    Yes and yes!
    Solfe

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Yes and yes!
    It's why I love astronomy. They have pictures of it from 3500 trillion miles away! Perhaps starspots will be a common word someday.

    So....
    It's been a puzzle for me as to how the heck the Sun, erroneously, got so yellow [/annoying] *wink*. But one key component to this may be found in the following questions:

    A) Who was one of the last great astronomers to do visual spectral analysis (with detailed spectral drawings) on a very large number of stars? [I want only the astronomer I'm thinking of, ]
    B) What bright example-case star did this astronomer use to assign our Sun, spectrally?
    C) What color is this star, as seen from his telescope?
    D) What subsequently happened that might have made this color stick?
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-16 at 05:20 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  4. #34
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    I had thought that it was Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, but no. Just posting to share a link to one of his books on Google. It is a fascinating read.
    Solfe

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I had thought that it was Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, but no. Just posting to share a link to one of his books on Google. It is a fascinating read.
    Looks like he produced 7000 nice astronomical illustrations! Some are shown on Wiki here (at bottom).

    He came slightly after the person in question.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uranium Sidus
    "Father of spectroscopy"? But I'll let others name him.
    Father indeed! Name is....?
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-22 at 02:36 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  7. #37
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    A) Who was one of the last great astronomers to do visual spectral analysis (with detailed spectral drawings) on a very large number of stars? [I want only the astronomer I'm thinking of, ]
    ....... Father Secchi is correct!
    B) What bright example-case star did this astronomer use to assign our Sun, spectrally?
    ...... [Must I compela ya'll for an answer?]
    C) What color is this star, as seen from his telescope?
    ...... [Hint: It ain't white.]
    D) What subsequently happened that might have made this color stick?
    ...... [I don't know if we will ever get this far, but it would be a Kodak moment.]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-28 at 08:46 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    A) Who was one of the last great astronomers to do visual spectral analysis (with detailed spectral drawings) on a very large number of stars? [I want only the astronomer I'm thinking of, ]
    ....... Father Secchi is correct!
    B) What bright example-case star did this astronomer use to assign our Sun, spectrally?
    ...... [Must I compela ya'll for an answer?]
    C) What color is this star, as seen from his telescope?
    ...... [Hint: It ain't white.]
    D) What subsequently happened that might have made this color stick?
    ...... [I don't know if we will ever get this far, but it would be a Kodak moment.]
    B- Capella.
    C- Yellow Orange
    D- Standardize observations by people like Kirchoff.
    Solfe

  9. #39
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    A) Who was one of the last great astronomers to do visual spectral analysis (with detailed spectral drawings) on a very large number of stars? [I want only the astronomer I'm thinking of, ]
    ....... Father Secchi is correct!
    B) What bright example-case star did this astronomer use to assign our Sun, spectrally?
    ...... [Must I compela ya'll for an answer?]
    ...... Capella is correct!
    C) What color is this star, as seen from his telescope?
    ...... [Hint: It ain't white.]
    ...... Yellow is correct! ding, ding ding.
    D) What subsequently happened that might have made this color stick?
    ...... [I don't know if we will ever get this far, but it would be a Kodak moment.]
    ...... Ooh, a Crota bash. No... Standardize observations by people like Kirchoff.
    ..... [I still remember the first video game (Pong) and I think I was disappointed it wasn't in color since we had a color tv, though my memory is a little rusty on all this. I did enjoy the game but not as much as Destiny.]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-29 at 05:02 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  10. #40
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    Destiny is what I do when I switch my brain off.
    Solfe

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    A) Who was one of the last great astronomers to do visual spectral analysis (with detailed spectral drawings) on a very large number of stars? [I want only the astronomer I'm thinking of, ]
    ....... Father Secchi is correct!
    B) What bright example-case star did this astronomer use to assign our Sun, spectrally?
    ...... [Must I compela ya'll for an answer?]
    ...... Capella is correct!
    C) What color is this star, as seen from his telescope?
    ...... [Hint: It ain't white.]
    ...... Yellow is correct! ding, ding ding.
    D) What subsequently happened that might have made this color stick?
    ...... [I don't know if we will ever get this far, but it would be a Kodak moment.]
    ...... Ooh, a Crota bash. No... Standardize observations by people like Kirchoff.
    ..... [I still remember the first video game (Pong) and I think I was disappointed it wasn't in color since we had a color tv, though my memory is a little rusty on all this. I did enjoy the game but not as much as Destiny.]
    ...... [Added: Your Kirchoff guess may well be a contributor to the color story, nevertheless. He and Bunsen made the startling conclusion that the two yellow absorption lines in the solar spectrum were due to a chemical element (sodium). I think this was the first connection made in assigning the Fraunhofer lines to the chemical elements. The Sun's strong two D lines (589.0nm and 589.6nm) being in the yellow part of the spectrum may have contributed to the yellow Sun idea, already at hand with Secchi, as well as, I think, his predecessor astronomer, Ignacio Danti. There is a little irony here, perhaps, in that the yellow portion of the spectrum is very narrow compared to the other colors.]
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-29 at 06:06 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Destiny is what I do when I switch my brain off.
    I'm trying to use my brain so I won't get insulted by 10-year olds like I once did when I first played the Wretched Eye and the ogre seemed to only chase me. I got two texts (one from each of them), "Are you doing anything?" and "You suck".
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-29 at 06:02 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    I'm trying to use my brain so I won't get insulted by 10-year olds like I once did when I first played the Wretched Eye and the ogre seemed to only chase me. I got two texts, "Are you doing anything?" and "You suck".
    Personally, I try to make this work for me. Play a defender and use a bullet hose to make the Ogre chase you. Inside the bubble, you don't take too much damage from him. If you time things right, you leave behind bubbles for you team to shoot from.

    Defenders must suck as astronomers, because everything is tinted pink inside those bubbles. Let me try to tie a video game back to the OP... not working...
    Solfe

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Personally, I try to make this work for me. Play a defender and use a bullet hose to make the Ogre chase you. Inside the bubble, you don't take too much damage from him. If you time things right, you leave behind bubbles for you team to shoot from.
    That's a nice tip and I do prefer my Titan, but I enjoy throwing grenades so I use Felwinter to double them but then loose my bubble. Fortunately, now with more experience, I am better in battle, especially for that strike, and I've had no other complaints since. Yeah. It reminds of Neil Tyson's comical statement about never expecting, as an astrophysicist, to get "hate mail from 3rd graders." This was regarding his demotion for Pluto at the Hayden after remodeling.

    Defenders must suck as astronomers, because everything is tinted pink inside those bubbles. Let me try to tie a video game back to the OP... not working...
    You're close. My Pong story is the key.
    Last edited by George; 2017-Aug-29 at 08:14 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  15. #45
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    I hereby entrust the next question to Solfe, since this all the color has gone from this last one.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  16. #46
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    I think I am back. One favorite classroom activity is to take the students outside at night to see how many things cast shadows. So far, we have found two astronomical bodies that cast shadows.

    It is possible for children to see shadows from 5 astronomical bodies, although not as I described. What are they?
    Solfe

  17. #47
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    Sun
    Moon
    Venus
    ISS
    Galactic center (although probably not from your location)

  18. #48
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    I'll guess:

    Some bodies cast shadows, some bodies cast the light that casts
    the shadows, and some do both. I'll guess:

    Sun
    Earth
    Luna
    Venus
    Jupiter
    Sirius

    Is six guesses for five slots cheating?

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  19. #49
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    I am really sorry ditching out. In an effort to keep the thread alive, the answers I was looking for were:

    Sun,
    Moon,
    Venus,
    Jupiter and
    Milky Way.

    I haven't heard of shadows from Sirus or ISS. So if I link shows up for either, can George select the next question asker?
    Solfe

  20. #50
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    Ug, it's pretty much a tie between the two of them. Arneb's ISS gets special credit since it can be as bright as -5.9, I think, so it would produce a moving shadow, which is cool. But we all know the center of the MW is a blackhole and that's not very bright ( kidding of course since it is a correct answer, admittedly.). On the other hand, Jeff is justified with his Jupiter and that's an alliteration, so let's go with...

    Jeff. It's your baby.
    Last edited by George; 2017-Oct-02 at 08:52 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  21. #51
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    Okay, I don't have any of my books or references available, so here
    is a very silly question that was already in my head.

    What is the name of the proposal to build a tall structure near the
    Moon's south pole, that would support panels of photovoltaic cells
    in the sunlight above craters that are always in shadow, and thus
    might contain frozen water? The electricity produced would support
    a manned operation to extract the water and do science or whatever
    else people might want to do there.

    I sat a couple of seats away from Buzz Aldrin in the audience when
    we heard a presentation on this proposal.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    The Database has been getting slow because of the size of the original thread, so I've created a second one to continue this quiz game.
    OK, but you'll have to rename the original thread the PENULTIMATE Astronomy Quiz.
    For astronomical graphics and data visit
    https://www.CurtRenz.com/astronomy.html

  23. #53
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    Centaur,

    Was my question too easy? Too silly? Or are you answering it
    right now while I'm typing this?

    ... And that isn't a trivia question!

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

  24. #54
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    Sorry, Jeff. I tried very hard to find a project with precisely that intention, and failed. Would you mind changing the question so as to get the ball into play again?

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