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Thread: 2017 Eclipse Documentaries/Stories?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Question 2017 Eclipse Documentaries/Stories?

    As with many folks on here, I had such a great experience with the eclipse last month, I am already feeling nostalgic for it and am wanting to re-live the event. So to help with that:

    Does anyone know of any good documentaries or short films about people's experience with the 2017 eclipse? From any perspective really, just looking for a good storyline of the day to follow and experience again.

    Here is one I found pretty interesting, https://www.youtube....h?v=imxRr8sn118

    Anyone have any others?

    Thanks in Advance!

  2. #2
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    It would be interesting to see a list of all the things associated with this, or any, eclipse. Perhaps two lists would be better with one being the phenomena and the second list of behavioral effects upon humans and the animal world.

    1) Cooling --- I found relief from the hot sun about 15 minutes before totality.
    2) Darkening--- The darkness was light enough to easily see things. The 360 deg. sunset was nice to see, too. [I assume the 2024 event will be noticeably darker since the umbral shadow is 80% greater.]
    3) Shadow advance --- Though we were on a hill, we had tall trees nearby so we did not see the umbral shadow advance on us. But Bryan Tobias (local astronomer) used a drone to film this over Casper.... here.
    4) Speed of shadow --- The speed over the Nashville region was about 1450 mph, but as it zipped off the planet this speed increased to over 100,000 mph.
    5) Diamond Ring --
    6) Bailey's Beeds --
    7) Corona ---------- As you'd expect, many pics are available, but here is one you won't see very often:
    Black hole effect A.jpg

    If you zoom in, you will see all the stars that pop-out during totality, especially the ones that are seen through the Sun. How rare is that! But, alas, they aren't stars...
    [This actually would go in the second list that I suggest under "Photographer's self-effacement". The moron that took this picture failed to remove the solar filter from the lens during totality, but in desperation, jumped to a very high ISO causing the artifacts that sorta look like stars. Note: if a moderator wishes to rebuke my self-condemnation, I suspect I will feel better. ]
    8) Flash Spectrum
    9) Prominences
    10) Electric pink chromosphere
    Here is one from Bill Keel who was also in Gallatin, TN. He nicely managed to combine #9 & 10 by giving us only pink prominences.
    Bill Keel Prominences.jpg
    11) Shadow band movements --- we spread a king-size white bed sheet on the ground and saw the movement of the shadow bands. We used an iphone and a movie camera, but the quality was about the same. The shadows seemed to propogate perpendicular to the Sun but I think that was also the wind direction.
    12) Fog formation over water -- I just learned about this (this week) from a guy up near Seattle. Fog formed just before totality over the river he was nearby and he could see the fog form on the Puget Sound. There are some Youtube videos of this.
    13) Paucity between totalities
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by George; 2017-Sep-15 at 03:37 PM.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  3. #3
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    As for the second list, I submit the following of my granddaugher, Camy, during totality who is know to be attracted to lights....
    Attachment 22632
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Black hole effect A.jpg

    If you zoom in, you will see all the stars that pop-out during totality, especially the ones that are seen through the Sun. How rare is that! But, alas, they aren't stars...
    Funny, I thought it was just dust on the camera lens.
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

  5. #5
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    Jumping in to add to some of George's comments -

    The prominences were visually the brightest things I can remember seeing where the color was so intense (probably just habit that makes me say crimson).

    A couple of wide-angle videos left running where we were (not far from George's site) showed streetlights coming on just after totality started - and someone flicking on their headlights and calmly driving between two hotels at the middle of totality. No urgency, just keeps on going. (File under wildlife behavior?)

    Regulus was a naked-eye object, but not at all prominent - I knew where to look and saw it, but not sure any of my fellow viewers did.

    Venus became easily visible about 10 minutes before totality - as time went on it looked stranger, because it was its usual electric-arc self while seen against a darkening background that the eye insisted still remained pale daylight blue.

    Several people remarked on how fast the sunlight visually went away and reappeared; that little diamond-ring spark is quite capable of casting shadows and illuminating the landscape. (The sharpness of the shadows was one of the visual cues that the sunlight was strange).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    Several people remarked on how fast the sunlight visually went away and reappeared; that little diamond-ring spark is quite capable of casting shadows and illuminating the landscape. (The sharpness of the shadows was one of the visual cues that the sunlight was strange).
    The sharpness of the shadows should have been on the list. When the sunlight comes from only a sliver of the sun then the rays are more parallel so less diffusion takes place. Facial color, and other objects, is also something that I've seen reported as changing. This, I would bet, is due to the greatly reduced color temperature from the solar limb (~ 5000K vs. the overall sp. ir. temp of 5850K).

    I think it was about 5 minutes before totality that my youngest daughter noted all the noise from crickets.

    The crowd at the church were cheering when totality came, and some set off a few fireworks.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  7. #7
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    Feb 2005
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    I'd like to see follow ups to this story
    http://mashable.com/2017/08/31/amazo.../#JlnQJtt1sPqo

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