Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Are we going to clone Stupid Mammoths

  1. #1

    Are we going to clone Stupid Mammoths

    A Study has found most of Mammoth remains found are young males. The scientist think it was because males make stupid or risky things while they are on there own or in bachelor herds.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/02/s...ils-males.html
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,405
    Stupid Judy Mammoths! Stupid Energy Cloning!

    (I've been on CQ for ten years, I'm allowed to make obscure references.)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,972
    Could be a good idea. IIRC, weren't all the Dinosaurs in Jurassic Park girls? Look how fast they took over. Stupid Mammoths might be easier to control.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Lugano, Switzerland
    Posts
    7,375
    https://www.verywell.com/are-men-more-accident-prone-than-women-2329115


    It's no secret that the
    male life expectancy is, on average, shorter than that of women. What is less well known is the fact that men are more accident-prone than women, with accidents and violence being major contributors to early deaths and disabilities among men.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,972
    Are men really more accident prone? Or is it that men work more dangerous jobs and engage in more dangerous sports, increasing the chance of a fatal accident?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,235
    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    Are men really more accident prone? Or is it that men work more dangerous jobs and engage in more dangerous sports, increasing the chance of a fatal accident?
    I think you just said the same thing twice...
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    8,947
    I find this kind of averaging irritating because it tells you nothing. Any individual might be more accident prone that these averages through many factors like eyesight, training, microbiome, sleep deprivation, toxicology, confusion, concentration, weakness, you name it, it will have an effect , in other words individuals will have a wide range of probabilities is a wide range of activities. Until you talk specifics this kind of statistic is no help.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4,805
    Quote Originally Posted by astrotimer View Post
    A Study has found most of Mammoth remains found are young males. The scientist think it was because males make stupid or risky things while they are on there own or in bachelor herds.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/02/s...ils-males.html
    Aren't we lucky that young human males in bachelor groups don't do stupid or risky things . . .

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,084
    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    Are men really more accident prone? Or is it that men work more dangerous jobs and engage in more dangerous sports, increasing the chance of a fatal accident?
    It may be that you assumed that “accident prone” means “clumsy” while it can also mean “having a tendency to do things that can get you into an accident.” I think it is often used in the way you took it, but different dictionaries seem to define it slightly differently.
    As above, so below

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,084
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I find this kind of averaging irritating because it tells you nothing. Any individual might be more accident prone that these averages through many factors like eyesight, training, microbiome, sleep deprivation, toxicology, confusion, concentration, weakness, you name it, it will have an effect.
    I’m surprised you didn’t mention a really key factor, being cautious. I agree of course that there are individual variations, but I don’t think it’s useless to make generalizations. Insurance premiums are often based on averages that are not necessarily true for a given individual.
    As above, so below

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    10,308
    Quote Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
    Are men really more accident prone? Or is it that men work more dangerous jobs and engage in more dangerous sports, increasing the chance of a fatal accident?
    Well, engaging in unnecessarily dangerous activities isn't intelligent behavior, which supports the OP's question
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12,235
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Well, engaging in unnecessarily dangerous activities isn't intelligent behavior, which supports the OP's question
    Actually, in several classes of vertebrates, males engaging in unnecessary risky behavior in the presence of females confers are HUGE benefit in reproductive success.

    Huge as in 66% percent in the case of guppies.

    Soooo, you're wrong.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,136
    Bachelor males in both Mammoth and modern Elephants are probably more at risk simply from not being part of the herd.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    location
    Posts
    12,410
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Well, engaging in unnecessarily dangerous activities isn't intelligent behavior, which supports the OP's question
    IIRC, it's the reverse. Those who are risk averse often over-estimate the danger. Those who correctly calculate the risk are smarter and may be more successful. However, probability catches up to them eventually. After all, which is smarter, the one that refuses to have reproductive success because a swamp is dangerous and avoids it completely, or the one that correctly calculates that the risk of getting stuck is only 10% but happens to get caught after a few trips (who may or may not have had any reproductive success on his forays)?

    Moreover, we can't be sure of their social dynamics, so we can't be sure of their motivations. Maybe they had bachelor groups, or maybe the young males were protecting a family group by testing paths in boggy terrain, or maybe it was a spirited defense against predators that allowed a relative to survive and pass on his/her genes. Kinda like how military veterans take big risks to protect others (I wouldn't call them stupid for that choice).
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    Aren't we lucky that young human males in bachelor groups don't do stupid or risky things . . .
    That is one of the reasons I posted it.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,972
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    It may be that you assumed that “accident prone” means “clumsy” while it can also mean “having a tendency to do things that can get you into an accident.” I think it is often used in the way you took it, but different dictionaries seem to define it slightly differently.
    Yeah. When I think of "accident prone", I think of Gilligan on "Gilligan's Island."

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,280
    Progress report from CNN on cloning mammoths... some success?

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/18/healt...ntl/index.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,280
    Maybe cloning mammoths isn't such a good idea, as the last ones were genetically damaged.

    http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology...ths-08100.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •