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Thread: NEW MEMBER? Introduce yourself in this thread. (Continued)

  1. #61
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    Welcome, Panzerkraken!
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

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  2. #62
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    Hello all! I found this place quite by accident and am rather enjoying lurking, but as I plan to post I thought it might be pertinent to introduce myself.

  3. #63
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    Welcome to the forum, Shadowybeige!
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

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  4. #64
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    Not a new member but it's been a good 8 years since I have been here! Happily married now! Still living in Berwick-upon-Tweed! Still loving everything spacey! And most of all! Still loving Brian Cox!

  5. #65
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    Im back too... i did just create a separate thread... but hey everyone

  6. #66
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    Sep 2019
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    Alright (you asked for it).....

    THSHarris introducing myself here. I'm an Engineering Scientist (ESM ** VA Tech, 1989) with Aerospace industry experience as a Dynamicist (V22 Osprey tiltrotor Integrated Test Team member through ground vibration, first flight and initial envelop expansion), Orbit Analyst (ComSat OA for DOD customer DMSP constellation), and interplanetary spacecraft mission Program Office Liaison Engineer (Mars Observer Program Management Office). Since 2012 I've been studying Planetary Science concepts surrounding the Carolina bays unit geological formation (large sand blanket with 10's of thousands of shallow oval depressions).

    In 2012 I saw some regional surface formation mapping research on those Carolina bays and they caught my attention as a potential astronomic imprint. Basically those shallow oval basins are identical to suborbital ballistic targeting diagrams, or "circular error probability" diagrams, which took my cloudy brain a long time to realize. Seeing some issues in his presentation that needed revision, I contacted that researcher and have since been in association and collaboration with him, Michael Davias at Cintos.org. I spreadsheet-programmed a bunch of equations from my Fundamentals of Astrodynamics textbook and got a terrestrial suborbital solver up and running, and it turns out to be grand utility for ejecta transport analysis in an Earthly setting. I just used a very simplified orbits model but it paints some important relationships very clearly when properly applied, apparently good for publishable content in related scientific conferences and journaled programs of same.

    In 2014 I started publishing abstracts and posters at conferences regarding some widely misunderstood concepts of Suborbital Analysis applied to a long standing puzzle of the Geoscience community, tektites. I've published at and attended & presented at LPSC, GSA, AGU and other conferences sponsored through the NASA-Industry-University collaborative USRA (Universities Space Research Alliance). So the research goes well. I'm in process with peer reviewed submission, and a huge backlog of content for that pubs route. If and when I get around to putting that stuff up at this forum, it may have to be Against Main Stream according to what I am reading in the rules here. My research shows a catastrophic origin of the Carolina bays as a medial ejecta blanket from highly oblique cometary collision (more of a ricochet actually) into the North American continental ice sheet in the mid Pleistocene, ~789,000 yrs ago, temporally coincident with Earth's most recent complete geomagnetic reversal at the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. It seems to be the identical missing planetary impact event that has eluded tektite researchers for over 5 decades after NASA researcher Dean R. Chapman erroneously concluded Lunar Origin of the tektites in the 1960s.

    More recently I have done substantial research into how consensus thinking on tektites could have possibly drifted so far off track that we may have been searching the wrong side of the planet for 5 decades looking for a geologically young impact structure of 300 km scale somewhere on continental crust, because that seems preposterous. The secret is the size. Its actually bigger than that, but flat, apparently swept clear from a blast of heavily shocked ice sheet that didn't spank the substrate bedrock until the oblique impact had already traversed the overhead, nearly horizontally. I finally identified Chapman's error of omission, the dreaded rotating frame transformation, a requisite for analyzing ejecta fall over the surface of a rotating planet. Every one of his papers lacks it. Then I set up and managed my suborbital solver spreadsheet tools to calculate launch location maps for the various conditions that we do know the tektites reentered at, and I solved the problem that Chapman failed to solve.

    There is an entry barrier to publishing in this case. It is ultimately the test of pride vs. humility. Institutional reviewers don't want to hear it, but the imprint bears the truth, so it will come out eventually.

    This is not a topic that the major journals want to handle now, as there are many new and wonderful discoveries and data coming out of the Planetary Science and Geoscience arenas. I'm having a challenge to make it appealing to contemporary readership, but the overall reality guarantees that it will all eventually be published. The unimaginable scale of it makes consensus scientists (most reviewers) reject it out of hand. But the ice sheet seems to have absorbed and carried away plenty of the heat or Kinetic Energy partitioned by the bolide right away in the immediate aftermath of the impact, before that heat could rain back down across earth and mess things up, like 65 million years ago at the end of the dinosaur's era. This geologically recent impact may have been 10 to 1000 times larger than the dinosaur termination impact event at Chicxulub, but the ice saved our bacon. Respect the ice, as it is most likely why we are here to talk about it as a species. And those are the basics of the hypothesis.

    Or I may be completely nuts!

    I have always looked up to the sky and space for inspiration, with an inherent yearning to control flight and movement above and beyond Earth's surface. But it wasn't until my late 40's that I realized I had shunned Earth Sciences for too long and at my own expense. And this has been a common problem in the sciences. Astronomers don't look down, and Geologists don't look up. The wise practitioner learns a keen sensitivity to both realms. After all, serious risk to life, limb and humanity itself may certainly come from either direction.

    I'm also an FAA certified rotorcraft and glider pilot, although I have not been current in that certification for over 20 yrs. I held an FAA private pilot's license at age 16, before I was legally driving. Currently I am a stay-at-home dad and I do lots of laundry and other family related activity. I used to design, build, and test fly my own radio controlled flying machines but that has slowed while the kids were younger, and now typically lower on the rather limited "spare minutes agenda" than the Planetary Science pursuits. And trying to get my kids into college. And still renovating remnant shore property damage from superstorm Sandy in 2012 (!). I have 500+ skydives and 3 dozen BASE jumps in my overall parachuting experience, but have not parachute jumped since before our kids were born. My wife and I met at the drop zone, so to stop jumping all together was a somewhat unexpected change, but instinctual and never a regret. It think it was a hormonal trigger of risk-avoidance behavior or executive function. Don't know really.

    After Aerospace I started developing hand held camera support technology for the broadcast production industry, putting aerospace structures and controls together in lightweight camera cranes and stabilizers, for which I hold a portfolio of domestic and international Patents. I did this because I had a strong and intuitive sense of structures, but also because I took extensive instrumentation courses for my Engineering degree. For the camera support technology I designed, developed and tested all of the hybrid digital-analog controls for the user interface. And I figured out how to drill clean-edged holes in pre-cured carbon fiber composites to within 0.001" tolerance (thousandth of an inch) repeatably, with bench top tooling. That is extremely rare industry know-how, and I didn't even put it in the Patent disclosure because I don't want to give away such commercially valuable knowledge.

    I did all of that tech development in my basement shop.

    I was also recently granted co-curatorship of one of the largest collections of Australasian tektites in the U.S.,*along with M. E. Davias of Cintos.org. We have been courting the tektite research camp since 2013, and have found support from rare individuals within that arena that place a firm belief in the importance of our research - Australasian tektites and the Carolina bays may have all come from the same natural history event 789,000 yrs ago, and impact that formed the North American Great Lakes. 60 billion tons of Australasian tektites are real, and so was the energy required to drive a majority of that mass to more than 80% of Earth's escape Kinetic Energy, or > 10 km/s. That's gotta leave a mark. Could the Great lakes be that mark and the Carolina bays be the medial ejecta (blanket) for the distal ejecta of Australasian tektites? Yes, it actually does make sense on many levels. 10 or 20 (or 50?) years from now it will be better represented in the literature as the required multidisciplinary research resources are eventually applied.

    Lastly, I always criticize myself and feel bad because I never have as much motivation as I should. There are so many tasks that I want to take on, and so few I ever have a chance to finish, that it is a constant source of frustration. For anyone who thinks this may be funny or peculiar based on what I have accomplished in my life listed above, it is indeed ironic. Achievement can be the mark of dissatisfaction, a fundamentally negative attitude or feeling about the way things are vs. the way we want them to be. It is to some degree a mark of unhappiness. I'm not complaining - just pointing out that a dissatisfied life isn't always easy by any stretch of the imagination. I'm definitely lucky to have such problems, and I completely realized that fact every day when I wake up, and every night when I go to bed. And that's pretty much who I am.

    THSH
    Last edited by Thsharris; 2019-Sep-27 at 02:00 AM. Reason: minor typos and technical errors, no content change :-)

  7. #67
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    Hi THSHarris, welcome to cQ.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  8. #68
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    Hello Everyone,
    I am SEO Expert in a private company and also a student in university.

  9. #69
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    Hello Everyone

    My name is Adi.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdiDev View Post
    My name is Adi.
    Adi

    I merged your thread into our general introduction thread. Welcome to CQ. And welcome to Logan77
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  11. #71
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    Dec 2019
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    Hey everyone! I'm Canadian, but live a little further south than my username implies. I have what I would call a passing interest in astronomy: I like the pretty pictures produced by the telescopes and radio arrays, and love listening to theories that astronomers use to explain things. Especially when the things start running counter to their current theories I'm also interested in space flight and robotic missions to other worlds.

    As far as "passing interest" goes, I don't own a telescope, haven't played KSP, and don't even have Stellarium running on my computer. My practical astronomy goes only as far as finding the Big Dipper, Polaris, and Orion in the night sky. Pices? Draco? The Pleiades? I know they're out there, but darned if I can find them without a guide book. Relativity? It's a super theory that's held up really, really well, but once I get past e=mc2 the math overwhelms me.

    Although I did once see the Galilean moons with a pair of binoculars.

    But I love listening to AstronomyCast and I follow Universe Today. Since both hosts are quite involved with this forum I thought I'd at least join up here. I'll mostly lurk and read what people who know more about astronomy than I do have to say.

  12. #72
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    Welcome to CQ Tuktuyaaqtuuq.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  13. #73
    Here is a fellow Canuck saying hi Tukuyaatuuq, from the south of great country in the province of New Brunswick.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

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