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Thread: Super-Earth civilization

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    Although (as a worldbuilder myself) I admire Chris Wayan's planets and attention to detail (those planets are all modelled in 3D, using plaster and paint), I find the descriptions of the societies on those worlds somewhat embarrassing. Sure, there might be a few planets that are hedonistic paradises with loose morals, but surely not all of them?
    in the old Japan the japanese were very fearless people and they simply committed infanticide of unwanted babies... in south pacific they did not do that but they lived STARVING on overopulated small islands...

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    Although (as a worldbuilder myself) I admire Chris Wayan's planets and attention to detail (those planets are all modelled in 3D, using plaster and paint), I find the descriptions of the societies on those worlds somewhat embarrassing. Sure, there might be a few planets that are hedonistic paradises with loose morals, but surely not all of them?
    for this reason, Albania (poor neighboring country with strict sex moralilty for women) is NOT a popular touristic destination for teen male europeans and we dream to go anywhere else: Thailand, Brazil, somebody Kenya etc...

    Last edited by Barabino; 2019-Jul-25 at 09:55 AM.

  3. #93
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    concerning worldbuilding

    I remember an unusual world-building site: the exo-animals were described 100% seriously and drawn professionally , but they were undoubtably erect penis-shaped :flash: and also their latin names were allusive to it... I'm pretty sure I've seen it for real - it's not a twisted fantasy of mine... do you remember it too?

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barabino View Post
    for this reason, Albania (poor neighboring country with strict sex moralilty for women) is NOT a popular touristic destination for teen male europeans
    Hmm. I've been to Albania. It'll be nice when they finish it.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barabino View Post
    concerning worldbuilding

    I remember an unusual world-building site: the exo-animals were described 100% seriously and drawn professionally , but they were undoubtably erect penis-shaped :flash: and also their latin names were allusive to it... I'm pretty sure I've seen it for real - it's not a twisted fantasy of mine... do you remember it too?
    Oh, yes - that is Snaiad. Actually I have a lot of respect for the speculative biology in the Snaiad project.
    https://www.deviantart.com/nemo-ramj...naiad-47017753

    The artist, Nemo Ramjet, has designed a vast array of credible-seeming animals to live on this world; only some of them use adapted genitals as limbs, but the reasoning behind these evolutionary developments seem sound enough.
    I would expect limb-like structures to evolve in a large number of different ways throughout the cosmos- sometimes evolving from tentacles, sometimes evolving from tusks, teeth or other mouthparts, scales, or protective spines. Appendages that evolve from reproductive organs don't seem too far from the realm of possibility.

  6. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    Hmm. I've been to Albania. It'll be nice when they finish it.
    I'm not sure what you mean, and this might be a language thing. It'll be nice when they finish Albania? What does that mean?
    As above, so below

  7. #97
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    Seems like a good time to abandon this thread. Alas.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    Hmm. I've been to Albania. It'll be nice when they finish it.

    hm-hm: especially older generations took pride in NOT working at all and pretending to be clever merchants who buy in china for cents and sell in europe for euros...

    my generation (I knew one as a neighbor) simply wanders by night stealing whatever they find: bricks, brass faucets, iron scraps...

  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean, and this might be a language thing. It'll be nice when they finish Albania? What does that mean?
    he was joking: it could be a nice country (unlike many dry muslim countries, it has plenty of water and it's NOT plagued with war) but they don't like to work: buildings, bridges etc. are left unfinished and can't be used... in short they are the evil small brothers of Turks
    Last edited by Barabino; 2019-Jul-26 at 08:28 AM.

  10. #100
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    I should have been more specific when I said that. The parts of Albania I went to were basically a big building site. They seem to be gearing to a future tourist boom that may never happen, but for the sake of their economy, I hope it does.

    Also interesting were the thousands of tiny concrete pillboxes, built by Enver Hoxha to defend against invasion by the rest of the world- an invasion that never took place.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunkers_in_Albania
    Last edited by eburacum45; 2019-Jul-26 at 07:05 AM.

  11. #101
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    on the contrary, in early '90s everybody rushed here to italy by inflatable boats to raise some money (to their merit, I admit that they could already speak italian)... in practice the country lost 60% of its population... adult girls just "worked" on the road (there are always some clients who don't prefer West Africa "chocolate" )...

  12. #102
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    Man, would those ever be good storm shelters in a tornado-prone state like mine.

  13. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    I should have been more specific when I said that. The parts of Albania I went to were basically a big building site. They seem to be gearing to a future tourist boom that may never happen, but for the sake of their economy, I hope it does.

    Also interesting were the thousands of tiny concrete pillboxes, built by Enver Hoxha to defend against invasion by the rest of the world- an invasion that never took place.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunkers_in_Albania

    yes, in 20th-century Albania the gov't feared to be invaded from either sides (from soviet bloc or from western bloc - and from lone rider Tito's Yugoslavia as well )

    obviously bunkers are useless against real world tanks : but the aim of Hoxha regime was only internal propaganda: just making populace live in terror... a lookalike of present N.Korea )
    Last edited by Barabino; 2019-Jul-27 at 04:08 AM.

  14. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Man, would those ever be good storm shelters in a tornado-prone state like mine.
    you can barely breath inside them


  15. #105
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    100% error-free rules do exist... but they are obvious and we don't philosophize about them...

    for example: hidden object still continue to exsist...

    most of the times, if we lose a mobile, we manage to find it again by making it to ring...

    Last edited by Barabino; 2019-Jul-28 at 06:56 AM.

  16. #106
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    I thought it was the smallest starfleet bridge for a moment.

  17. #107
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    The existence of the second super-Earth seems to be confirmed (by ground telescopes, yet) at nearby star LHS 1140. Question remains: can we settle them?

    https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/20...1109R/abstract

    Achieving Sub-Millimagnitude Precision from the Ground: the Capabilities of ARCTIC and the LHS 1140 System
    Roberts, Jessica Elizabeth; Cruz-Arce, Carlos E.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory

    As TESS observes most stars for only 28 days, many TESS planetary candidates will require future observations by other facilities in order to be properly vetted. Ground-based observations of these candidates can reject false positives, update mid-transit times, refine planetary parameters, and provide long-term monitoring of interesting systems. Ground-based telescopes achieve these science goals in part due to their larger size compared to TESS's 0.1m diameter lens. However, most observations from the ground struggle to achieve precisions better than 1 millimagnitude. The new CCD imager ARCTIC, installed on the 3.5m Apache Point Observatory Telescope, attains extreme precision by combining its large collecting area (1000× larger than TESS) with a diffuser that spreads the stellar PSF into a stable top-hat. We test the performance of this instrument by observing multiple transits of LHS 1140b and LHS 1140c. LHS 1140 is a nearby M-dwarf orbited by two rocky, near Earth-sized planets, including one in the habitable zone. This system therefore presents a unique opportunity to study two rocky planets in very different temperature regimes around the same star. Our observations double the number of published LHS 1140b and 1140c transits, and we use these to update the ephemeris and better constrain the planetary parameters. We find ARCTIC achieves a RMS of 150ppm on LHS 1140 for data binned to 20 minute timescales. Based on our success with the LHS 1140 system, we predict that ARCTIC will prove a useful instrument for future TESS follow-up on both smaller and fainter planet candidates as TESS moves into the northern hemisphere this year.

  18. #108
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    Touching on a topic mentioned elsewhere in this thread, spaceflight from super-Earths is going to be rough.

    https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/20....393H/abstract

    Spaceflight from Super-Earths is difficult
    Hippke, Michael

    Many rocky exoplanets are heavier and larger than the Earth and have higher surface gravity. This makes space-flight on these worlds very challenging because the required fuel mass for a given payload is an exponential function of planetary surface gravity, exp(g0). We find that chemical rockets still allow for escape velocities on Super-Earths up to 10× Earth mass. More massive rocky worlds, if they exist, would require other means to leave the planet, such as nuclear propulsion. This is relevant for space colonization and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #109
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    As long as we are talking about super-Earth civilizations, what if Earth was a super-Earth? Eye-opening article with some things I hadn't expected, like steam planets, water planets with pressure ice at the core, and Earth not being a good place to live.

    https://www.livescience.com/what-if-super-earth.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    As long as we are talking about super-Earth civilizations, what if Earth was a super-Earth? Eye-opening article with some things I hadn't expected, like steam planets, water planets with pressure ice at the core, and Earth not being a good place to live.

    https://www.livescience.com/what-if-super-earth.html
    It's so unfortunate that most of the exoplanets we've discovered so far are either gas giants or super-Earths. Once the James Webb Telescope launches, we'll probably be able to find planets similar to our own size and atmospheric composition. I think there's a good chance we'll find that surface liquid water worlds such as ours are far common than we initially thought.

  21. #111
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    We might be able to detect whether LHS 1140 b has life. A super-Earth with life, mmmm, good.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.11426

    Detectability of biosignatures on LHS 1140 b

    Fabian Wunderlich, Markus Scheucher, John Lee Grenfell, Franz Schreier, Clara Sousa-Silva, Mareike Godolt, Heike Rauer

    Terrestrial extrasolar planets around low-mass stars are prime targets when searching for atmospheric biosignatures with current and near-future telescopes. The habitable-zone Super-Earth LHS 1140 b could hold a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere and is an excellent candidate for detecting atmospheric features. In this study, we investigate how the instellation and planetary parameters influence the atmospheric climate, chemistry, and spectral appearance of LHS 1140 b. We study the detectability of selected molecules, in particular potential biosignatures, with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). In a first step we use the coupled climate-chemistry model, 1D-TERRA, to simulate a range of assumed atmospheric chemical compositions dominated by H2 and CO2. Further, we vary the concentrations of CH4 by several orders of magnitude. In a second step we calculate transmission spectra of the simulated atmospheres and compare them to recent transit observations. Finally, we determine the observation time required to detect spectral bands with low resolution spectroscopy using JWST and the cross-correlation technique using ELT. In H2-dominated and CH4-rich atmospheres O2 has strong chemical sinks, leading to low concentrations of O2 and O3. The potential biosignatures NH3, PH3, CH3Cl and N2O are less sensitive to the concentration of H2, CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere. In the simulated H2-dominated atmosphere the detection of these gases might be feasible within 20 to 100 observation hours with ELT or JWST, when assuming weak extinction by hazes. If further observations of LHS 1140 b suggest a thin, clear, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere, the planet would be one of the best known targets to detect biosignature gases in the atmosphere of a habitable-zone rocky exoplanet with upcoming telescopes.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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