Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: ESA's Hera mission.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,346

    ESA's Hera mission.

    Hera mission will try and visit the smallest asteroid to date.

    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...d_ever_visited

    ESA’s planet-defending Hera mission will set a new record in space. The asteroid investigator will not only be the first spacecraft to explore a binary asteroid system – the Didymos pair – but the smaller of these two worldlets, comparable in size to Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza, will become the smallest asteroid ever visited.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,346
    Hera will not be alone on its mission. In fact it will have two travelling companions. Juventas and GMV are CubeSats that will hitching a ride with Hera.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/He...eroid_999.html

    Small enough to be an aircraft carry-on, the Juventas spacecraft nevertheless has big mission goals. Once in orbit around its target body, Juventas will unfurl an antenna larger than itself, to perform the very first subsurface radar survey of an asteroid.

    ESA's proposed Hera mission for planetary defence will explore the twin Didymos asteroids, but it will not go there alone: it will also serve as mothership for Europe's first two 'CubeSats' to travel into deep space.

    CubeSats are nanosatellite-class missions based on standardised 10-cm boxes, making maximum use of commercial off the shelf systems. Juventas will be a '6-unit' CubeSat, selected to fly aboard Hera along with the similarly-sized APEX Asteroid Prospection Explorer, built by a Swedish-Finnish-German-Czech consortium.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,346
    Hera asteroid mission's brain to be radiation-hard and failure-proof

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/He...proof_999.html

    At the heart of ESA's Hera mission to the double Didymos asteroids will be an onboard computer intended to be failure-proof.

    Designed to operate up to 490 million km away from Earth and withstanding four years of harsh radiation exposure, Hera's computer must run smoothly without locking up or crashing - on pain of mission failure, while pushing the limits of onboard autonomy.

    Development of the Hera mission for planetary defence is taking place across Europe, to finalise a ready-to-build design to present to Europe's space ministers at the Space19+ Ministerial Council this November. Hera's onboard computer is being overseen by QinetiQ Space in Belgium, also the makers of the Proba family of technology-testing minisatellites.
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Klang, Malaysia
    Posts
    7,346
    Two cubesats will be accompanying Hera.

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Wh...eroid_999.html

    ESA's Hera mission for planetary defence, being designed to survey the smallest asteroid ever explored, is really three spacecraft in one. The main mothership will carry two briefcase-sized CubeSats, which will touch down on the target body. A French team has been investigating what might happen at that initial instant of alien contact.

    "We've customised an existing drop tower and rigged it up with a system of pulleys and counterweights in order to simulate a low gravity environment," explains researcher Naomi Murdoch of the Institut Superieur de l'Aeronautique et de l'Espace (ISAE-Supaero), part of the University of Toulouse.

    "We can go down to a few percent of Earth's gravity within the test box that we place within the drop tower, containing a model lander and simulated asteroid terrain. "Our team started out with a spherical lander touching down on a sandy surface, but we've progressed to cubic shapes more representative of the actual CubeSats. We've also been studying the influence of different surface materials, and sought to understand how the landing process varies with different material properties, gravity levels and velocities.

    "This is necessary because each time we go to a different asteroid we end up surprised by what we find. For instance, Japan's Hayabusa2, currently exploring the Ryugu asteroid, has found much scarcer 'regolith' dust and more boulders than researchers had expected."
    I am because we are
    (African saying)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •