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Thread: more dense space

  1. #1
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    more dense space

    I was wondering, if the space between galaxies was much more dense than currently thought, how would that affect the velocity curves of galaxies? Could the higher density contribute to the flatness of the velocity curves?
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  2. #2
    If the density is much more dense it could mean the universe will collapse onto itself.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    If the density is much more dense it could mean the universe will collapse onto itself.
    Assuming that there are other factors counteracting contraction.
    The moment an instant lasted forever, we were destined for the leading edge of eternity.

  4. #4
    Sorry, you are talking about the rotation of galaxies, if there was more mass out there then observed it would probably mean there would less dark matter or no dark matter. But dark matter is kind of a catch all for all kinds of possible things so unless we have observations of what is out there we can't really say.
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  5. #5
    Or are talking about the space time fabric in space between galaxies being more dense. The space time near the center the milky way is more dense because there is more matter like the super massive black holes and generally density of stars and galaxies being denser in the core of the galaxy and objects orbit faster in the core. So if space-time was more dense in the outer regions and the intergalactic space was less dense it might change the velocity curve of the galaxies but seems like special pleading to me, I don't like dark matter so I will make something up to get rid of it. I am far from an expert in GR so I don't what the calculations show or which ones to work with to figure out if would have an effect.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Or are talking about the space time fabric in space between galaxies being more dense. The space time near the center the milky way is more dense because there is more matter like the super massive black holes and generally density of stars and galaxies being denser in the core of the galaxy and objects orbit faster in the core. So if space-time was more dense in the outer regions and the intergalactic space was less dense it might change the velocity curve of the galaxies but seems like special pleading to me, I don't like dark matter so I will make something up to get rid of it. I am far from an expert in GR so I don't what the calculations show or which ones to work with to figure out if would have an effect.
    I was thinking of dark matter between galaxies being 30- 100 times more dense than normal matter. How would that affect gravitational rotation curves.
    The moment an instant lasted forever, we were destined for the leading edge of eternity.

  7. #7
    It would probably depend on the dark matter is distributed if it is 30-100 times the mass of normal matter at the outer edges of galaxy it would have an effect on the rotation of the galaxy but if it is a gradual build up of more and more dark matter the further you get away form the galaxy it probably wont have much of an effect.
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  8. #8
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    I Can't See It !!

    Quote Originally Posted by Copernicus View Post
    I was wondering, if the space between galaxies was much more dense than currently thought, how would that affect the velocity curves of galaxies? Could the higher density contribute to the flatness of the velocity curves?
    The Wiki article subsection on Dark Matter and rotation curves is here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_m...otation_curves

    and I thought it good, particularly the two videos.

    Note that all that is required to explain the rotation curve is a spherical 'halo' of dark matter around the galaxy. No changes to intergalatic density are required.
    I'm not a hardnosed mainstreamer; I just like the observations, theories, predictions, and results to match.

    "Mainstream isnít a faith system. It is a verified body of work that must be taken into account if you wish to add to that body of work, or if you want to change the conclusions of that body of work." - korjik

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Mendenhall View Post
    The Wiki article subsection on Dark Matter and rotation curves is here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_m...otation_curves

    and I thought it good, particularly the two videos.

    Note that all that is required to explain the rotation curve is a spherical 'halo' of dark matter around the galaxy. No changes to intergalatic density are required.
    Thank you.
    The moment an instant lasted forever, we were destined for the leading edge of eternity.

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