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Thread: Hottest temperature in universe

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Tate View Post
    * 5.5 TK, highest man-made temperature in thermal equilibrium as of 2015 (quark–gluon plasma from LHC collisions): good one; a quark-gluon plasma, created by colliding lead nuclei in the LHC, exists for long enough for the quarks and gluons to reach equilibrium (or close
    enough)
    One thing I’ve always wondered about the quark-gluon plasma - does it always contain the original quarks (so the new pairs being produced come into being when the gluons “snap”), or would the plasma contain at least some “melange of Raw energy” (for lack of a better term) that condenses into the resultant particles?

    For example, say we’re colliding hydrogen with anti-hydrogen (so 6 quarks total), and we detect a new strange / anti-strange pair getting produced. Would that mean we would always have 8 quarks (at least until they decay), or could we find the new ones come at the expense of some of the original ?

    I guess electron/positron collisions can create strange / anti-strange pairs (right?), so starting with gluons and quarks is not strictly a necessity.



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  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    744
    Quote Originally Posted by Ufonaut99 View Post
    One thing I’ve always wondered about the quark-gluon plasma - does it always contain the original quarks (so the new pairs being produced come into being when the gluons “snap”), or would the plasma contain at least some “melange of Raw energy” (for lack of a better term) that condenses into the resultant particles?

    For example, say we’re colliding hydrogen with anti-hydrogen (so 6 quarks total), and we detect a new strange / anti-strange pair getting produced. Would that mean we would always have 8 quarks (at least until they decay), or could we find the new ones come at the expense of some of the original ?
    I think a key breakthrough, in HEP (high energy particle physics) was asymptotic freedom: at "low" energies, quarks and gluons are confined to hadrons like protons; as the energy rises, they become increasingly free. I am very fuzzy on how strange (charm, bottom, top) quarks (and anti-quarks) can appear in a quark-gluon plasma as its energy is increased.

    I guess electron/positron collisions can create strange / anti-strange pairs (right?), so starting with gluons and quarks is not strictly a necessity.
    I think this is true, but whether such collisions can produce quark-gluon plasmas (cf sets of particle/anti-particle pairs) I do not know.

    The cores of the most massive neutron stars may be some sort of hyperon sea, as the low energy states are fully occupied, allowing/requiring the most energetic neutrons to transform into hyperons. Sorta like how the highest electron Fermi gas in a massive white dwarf can be forced/required to combine with protons to form neutrons (and result in a catastrophic collapse).

    "forced/required"? The ergodic theorem: "everything which is not forbidden is compulsory"

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    744
    Recent Gimodo article is pertinent to this thread: What's The Hottest Object In The Universe?

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