Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 57 of 57

Thread: New Binary Gravitational Wave event

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    Another few events have been announced. The most recent was S191222n, which is a binary black hole event about 700 megaparsecs from here. There were also events on December 15th & 16th.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    Another event reported: S191225aq ... I suspect this one will prove to be not a real event. If it is real, it is a mass gap event about 21 megaparsecs from here, somewhere in the direction between Orion and Taurus. That would be very close as these things go.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    46
    What exactly is the nature of "gravitational wave"?

    Sent from my A502DL using Tapatalk

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    15,624
    Quote Originally Posted by showmeonthedollwhere View Post
    What exactly is the nature of "gravitational wave"?
    As I think you're well aware of what 'the nature of "gravitational wave"' is in mainstream science, since you started an ATM thread wherein that topic is quite important, we'll not dilute a news thread with this off-topic (for this thread) discussion.
    ____________
    "Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." -- Frank Zappa
    "Your right to hold an opinion is not being contested. Your expectation that it be taken seriously is." -- Jason Thompson
    "This is really very simple, but unfortunately it's very complicated." -- publius

    Moderator comments in this color | Get moderator attention using the lower left icon:
    Recommended reading: Forum Rules * Forum FAQs * Conspiracy Theory Advice * Alternate Theory Advocates Advice

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    Another event reported: S191225aq ... I suspect this one will prove to be not a real event. ...
    Declared not a GW event (terrestrial origin).
    Forming opinions as we speak

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200112r is a binary black hole event perhaps 3 billion light years from here. there have been quite a few events recently which were rejected. I don't know if the criteria have changed for what gets reported, or is perhaps more of the marginal ones are getting rejected than previously. An interesting one is S200105ae, which was listed as 97% chance of being terrestrial, but is listed as confirmed (BH-NS event). This raises my curiosity about what suggests that one of these events is terrestrial.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200114f happened about 20 minutes ago, and the details are still coming in. This one was localized well to a small part of the sky in Gemeni, but was not an obvious transient in the observed EM wavelengths or neutrinos.
    This event has gotten some news for being an unusual GW event, but the news is not very specific about what makes it unusual.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200115j happened recently (4am UT). It is a mass gap event.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200128d was detected recently. It appears to be a very distant binary black hole merger.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200129m was detected recently. This appears to be a fairly nearby (900 megaparsecs) binary black hole with a very narrowly defined direction.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200208q was detected recently. It appears to be a binary black hole event about 3000 megaparsecs from here.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200213t was recently detected. It is likely to have been a binary neutron star event, though no gamma ray, and probably no neutrino event was detected in connection to it (Ice Cube detected an event in the time window).
    Forming opinions as we speak

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    200219ac was recently detected. The reporting on this seems incomplete, but it is listed as an event 1500 MPc away, and the type of event wasn't given, so perhaps the wave form is unusual. Normally we only detect binary black hole mergers from that distance.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    200224ca was recently detected. It was a binary black hole about 1400 lMPc away, but the location was surprisingly narrow, being someplace just south of the CE, between Virgo and Leo.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    200225q was recently detected. It was a binary black hole about 1000 MPc away, but the location couldn't be nailed down as well as yesterday's.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  16. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    The Space Coast
    Posts
    4,618
    We seem to be detecting quite a few of these now. How is the discovery rate compared to initial expectations?

    CJSF
    "Off went his rocket at the speed of light
    Flying so fast there was no day or night
    Messing around with the fabric of time
    He knows who's guilty 'fore there's even a crime

    Davy, Davy Crockett
    The buckskin astronaut
    Davy, Davy Crockett
    There's more than we were taught"

    -They Might Be Giants, "The Ballad Of Davy Crockett (In Outer Space)"


    lonelybirder.org

  17. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    We seem to be detecting quite a few of these now. How is the discovery rate compared to initial expectations?

    CJSF
    I recall that we were expecting to observe roughly 50 to 100 per year with the present equipment. There are improvements planned (and hopefully eventually funded) that should within 25 years allow observing several such events per minute, though most of the new ones will be smaller events, including distant supernovae, merging neutron stars, and miscellaneous local collisions. Merging stellar mass black holes might be as many as one every few hours.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  18. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200302c was recently observed. It appears to be a binary black hole. Triangulation to its location was very weak.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  19. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,116
    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    I recall that we were expecting to observe roughly 50 to 100 per year with the present equipment. There are improvements planned (and hopefully eventually funded) that should within 25 years allow observing several such events per minute, though most of the new ones will be smaller events, including distant supernovae, merging neutron stars, and miscellaneous local collisions. Merging stellar mass black holes might be as many as one every few hours.
    We've quickly come from "do these waves even exist?" to "look at all this evidence!" The progress is remarkable.

    ETA: And I would love to know what Albert Einstein would have said about all of this research.

  20. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200303ba was recently observed. It appears to be a binary black hole event perhaps 800 megaparsecs from here (closer than the average of those being detected with our current equipment). The location of this one made it difficult to tell whether it was in the Northern sky or southern sky, but it was otherwise fairly well located.

    Post edit: This one seems to not be a real event. Sometimes they run tests and don't tell the analysts.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  21. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200308e was recently observed. Originally identified as a neutron star-black hole merger, this is now lists as as advno (not an event). I wish I knew more about the causes of these non-events, since this one was observed at all three locations. Maybe it was just another test.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  22. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200311bg was recently observed. It's location appears to have made it possible to place it quite accurately in the sky, but as a binary black hole event about 700 megaparsecs from here (one of the closer ones), it is unlikely to have a counterpart that we observe any other way.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  23. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,796
    "New" (old) events discovered after analysis of LIGO-Virgo data

    https://phys.org/news/2020-03-gravit...lack-hole.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  24. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    I understand that in the next twenty years detectors will be developed with 20 km long arms, which will be much better tuned for observing binary neutron stars.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  25. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,796
    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    I understand that in the next twenty years detectors will be developed with 20 km long arms, which will be much better tuned for observing binary neutron stars.
    Of course, eventually all that ice on which detectors are being build will melt. Where will these things get built after that?

    Oops, think I got that wrong.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Of course, eventually all that ice on which detectors are being build will melt. Where will these things get built after that?

    Oops, think I got that wrong.
    Right the GW detectors are in Louisiana, Washington State, and Italy (so far, new ones soon in India and China). I don't know where the long-armed ones will get built.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  27. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    S200316bj was recently observed. It appears to be a binary black hole about 1000 megaparsecs from here. I had wondered whether the pandemic would shut down the observatories, but apparently not.
    Forming opinions as we speak

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •