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Thread: Flying-V, the non-stealth stealth-looking passenger aircraft

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Flying-V, the non-stealth stealth-looking passenger aircraft

    Interesting look, have no judgment otherwise yet.

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/k...ntl/index.html
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  2. #2
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    Blended Wing-Body. Nothing new.

    ETA: Wait, just saw the other pictures. It is a bit different. And looks structurally very difficult.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #3
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    I had the same initial reaction as Treb when I saw an image-link to an article on it at another site. So I didn't click on it. That front view is misleading if you're already familiar with the blended wing body.

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    See if this helps. It is a strange one.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    Presenting the A-797, by the Boeing division of Airbus...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    See if this helps. It is a strange one.
    Looks like you'd see Princess Amidala step out of it.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  7. #7
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    The first thing I thought of when I saw this was the Northrop B-49 flying wing, which the Air Force cancelled for dubious reasons. When I was an early teen back in 1962 we visited the Los Angeles home of a Northrop public relations officer, husband of one of my mother's cousins, and he showed us a documentary film of that revolutionary plane. In the presentation they explained the benefits of not having a long skinny fuselage. The B-2 stealth bomber is about the same shape but more angular looking as a result of measures taken to reduce its radar signature, and if I am not mistaken, justice was done when Jack Northrop lived to see it fly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    The first thing I thought of when I saw this was the Northrop B-49 flying wing, which the Air Force cancelled for dubious reasons. When I was an early teen back in 1962 we visited the Los Angeles home of a Northrop public relations officer, husband of one of my mother's cousins, and he showed us a documentary film of that revolutionary plane. In the presentation they explained the benefits of not having a long skinny fuselage. The B-2 stealth bomber is about the same shape but more angular looking as a result of measures taken to reduce its radar signature, and if I am not mistaken, justice was done when Jack Northrop lived to see it fly.
    It was Symington. Myopic @#%#$@^%^$&#&$#$~@#

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northr...tional_history
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  9. #9
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    I think the documentary was called THE WING WILL FLY
    https://www.amazon.com/Wing-Will-Fly.../dp/B003I6D6XQ

    Jody Allen is the new Proxmire--she just killed Stratolaunch. Errr....

    In other news, here is an unusual (flying?) object
    https://www.cnet.com/videos/adifo-is...f-quad-copter/
    https://newatlas.com/adifo-flying-sa...omanian/58999/

  10. #10
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    It's funny, after all these years I realize now why, in the original 1950s' movie The War of the Worlds, the B-49 Flying Wing was sent out with the atomic bomb to attack the Martians: it had very little radar profile.

    Wonder how much radar profile this new jet will have.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #11
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    I have heard a lot about Y shapes
    https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/in...835#msg1956835

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    More on the blended wing by Airbus. Different shape now.

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/a...ric/index.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    The first thing I thought of when I saw this was the Northrop B-49 flying wing, which the Air Force cancelled for dubious reasons. When I was an early teen back in 1962 we visited the Los Angeles home of a Northrop public relations officer, husband of one of my mother's cousins, and he showed us a documentary film of that revolutionary plane. In the presentation they explained the benefits of not having a long skinny fuselage. The B-2 stealth bomber is about the same shape but more angular looking as a result of measures taken to reduce its radar signature, and if I am not mistaken, justice was done when Jack Northrop lived to see it fly.
    It was canceled, at least partly, due to stability issues. Flying wings tend to be short on damping on all three axes. They also tend to need more runway than conventional aircraft.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    The first thing I thought of when I saw this was the Northrop B-49 flying wing, which the Air Force cancelled for dubious reasons. When I was an early teen back in 1962 we visited the Los Angeles home of a Northrop public relations officer, husband of one of my mother's cousins, and he showed us a documentary film of that revolutionary plane. In the presentation they explained the benefits of not having a long skinny fuselage. The B-2 stealth bomber is about the same shape but more angular looking as a result of measures taken to reduce its radar signature, and if I am not mistaken, justice was done when Jack Northrop lived to see it fly.
    There was an earlier one too called the Horten HO 229.

    https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...ad-of-its-time

    It's under restoration ATM, minus its wings to the right of the image.


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaurieAG View Post
    There was an earlier one too called the Horten HO 229.

    https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...ad-of-its-time

    It's under restoration ATM, minus its wings to the right of the image.

    Flying wings have a pretty long history, starting before the Wright Brothers, but Jack Northrop had some flying before WWII, and JW Dunne had one before WWI. Flying wings were a very active area of investigation between WWI and WWII. Since then, Fauvel and others have kept the idea alive. Rather obviously, one of their problems for air transport is where does one put the people and the emergency exits. Also, flying wings don't have much yaw stability, and maintaining control after an engine failure could be problematic. There are serious reasons they're not common, and most of them don't involve regulatory agencies.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

    How do things fly? This explains it all.

    Actually they can't: "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Flying wings have a pretty long history, starting before the Wright Brothers, but Jack Northrop had some flying before WWII, and JW Dunne had one before WWI. Flying wings were a very active area of investigation between WWI and WWII. Since then, Fauvel and others have kept the idea alive. Rather obviously, one of their problems for air transport is where does one put the people and the emergency exits. Also, flying wings don't have much yaw stability, and maintaining control after an engine failure could be problematic. There are serious reasons they're not common, and most of them don't involve regulatory agencies.
    Yes. It took technology to catch up with the control issues, which made the B-2 capable (even if its mission was defunct before the first one was built). That means that any serious use of a flying wing design would be even more dependent on technology to safely fly than standard aircraft do now. Given the state of affairs at Boeing, that should give pause. At least it does for me.

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