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Thread: Planet around GQ Lupi

  1. #1
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    Planet around GQ Lupi

    Direct detection by imaging of an extrasolar planet around a young T Tauri star GQ Lupi.

    Seems like the preprint isn't yet in the arXiv.org so can't say more.

    [GQ not CQ, sorry]

  2. #2
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    The preprint is now online. Though I don't understand much of it. #-o

    The planet seems to have a mass of 2 times that of Jupiter, radius 1.8 times Jupiter, semimajor axis 103 astronomical units, orbital period about 1200 years and surface temperature as much as 2000 Kelvins. The planet is only a million years old. That's why it's so hot.

  3. #3
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    Wow that's a big orbit for a planet. Must have a been a massive planetary disk, even though it's only a K7 star.

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    Im still waiting for the discovery of an "Earth-class" planet.

    No more gas giants...please! 8)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzard
    Im still waiting for the discovery of an "Earth-class" planet.

    No more gas giants...please! 8)
    Patience. Wait a few years...

  6. #6
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    Fascinating--it's just a shame that it isn't close enough to its GQ Lupi to make radial velocity measurements practical. Of course, then it would also probably be too close to see, so it's a trade-off.

  7. #7
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    Jovian-schmovian, I don't care what kinda planet it is, they bagged one on camera.

    That's cause for a little celebrating.

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    There is still a change that it is actually a brown dwarf as much as 42 times as massive as Jupiter. But probably they have a good reason to think otherwise.

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    42? I though you said 2 originally... :-?

    April fools?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TravisM
    42? I though you said 2 originally... :-?

    April fools?
    Quote Originally Posted by Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia
    The value of the mass depends on atmosphere models and could be up to 42 MJ
    But I'm pretty sure that they have a good reason to call this a planet.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu
    The planet seems to have a mass of 2 times that of Jupiter, radius 1.8 times Jupiter, semimajor axis 103 astronomical units, orbital period about 1200 years and surface temperature as much as 2000 Kelvins. The planet is only a million years old. That's why it's so hot.
    You realize that 103 AU is the minimum current distance between GQ Lupi and the planet -- it assumes the star-planet line is perpendicular to our line of sight. Most likely it is greater than that.

    OTOH, semi-major axis might actually be smaller than the current distance -- if GQ Lupi b has an eccentric orbit, we may have caught it near aphelion. In fact, if GQ Lupi b were flung into its current orbit rather than formed there, that orbit is almost certainly elliptical.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu
    Patience. Wait a few years...
    What we be the technology that would allow us to image smaller planets - more powerful optics, better filtering if the star's light?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodler
    Jovian-schmovian, I don't care what kinda planet it is, they bagged one on camera.
    Yeah -- but in this case, it's only visible because it's 2000 Kelvins and is thus glowing from its own heat.

    If it'd been a cold planet -- even one with a 100% albedo -- I doubt it would have reflected enough starlight to have been visible to us.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaeger
    Quote Originally Posted by Kullat Nunu
    Patience. Wait a few years...
    What we be the technology that would allow us to image smaller planets - more powerful optics, better filtering if the star's light?
    Here, here, and here, as examples.

    I think it will be a race between ground-based observatories, and space-based telescopes.

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