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Thread: There May be Thick Ice Deposits on the Moon and Mercury

  1. #1
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    There May be Thick Ice Deposits on the Moon and Mercury

    According to a new analysis of LRO and MESSENGER data, the ice deposits on the Moon and Mercury could be even more plentiful than we thought.
    The post There May be Thick Ice Deposits on the Moon and Mercury appeared first on Universe Today.


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  2. #2
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    Who's "we"? This estimate is in the area of 100 million metric tons on the moon (a number that would have been helpful to include in the article). Chandrayaan-1 saw an estimated 600 million metric tons.

  3. #3
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    Does Mercury manufacture its own ice because of its heat? Could we colonize Mercury?

    https://phys.org/news/2020-03-mercury-ice.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Does Mercury manufacture its own ice because of its heat? Could we colonize Mercury?

    https://phys.org/news/2020-03-mercury-ice.html
    Roger. Nope. It's the solar wind. The wind blows off the surface of the sun. The composition of the wind matches the abundance noted by spectroscopy of the surface of the sun. First in abundance is hydrogen. Then helium. Then number three is oxygen. There are no known compounds of helium, so it escapes as plasma, and eventually cools down to make atomic helium when it recombines. Fill yer balloons up. So, the hydrogen ions being plus charge, attract the oxygen ions being negatively charged. That's what makes water ubiquitous in the universe. Giant molecular clouds have some. Comets have, in general, a lot, and the shadowy areas of the moon's craters, some of Mercury's craters, Mars' craters, etc....have slowly picked up water molecules passing by.
    In the case of Mars, the presence of Fe-60 in deep ocean Earth sediments, indicates a supernova blast wave pentetrated the outgoing solar wind, to the depth of Earth's orbit, and that too, would have brought water, in addition to many other r - process elements . Water, water, everywhere, and more than a drop to drink.
    pete

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