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Thread: making dark matter

  1. #1
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    making dark matter

    I assume humans have never been able to make dark matter because all the reactions products are always accounted for. If this is true, than I imagine nothing we can detect can be broken up into dark matter. If this is true, would the only way to detect dark matter would be through its gravitational affects or by imparting momentum to some other particle, however rare this may be. Thoughts!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Copernicus View Post
    I assume humans have never been able to make dark matter because all the reactions products are always accounted for.
    Well, neutrinos were initially only known because of a shortfall in the energy account. It took decades to detect them (more) directly. (Still, indirectly.) So they are a form of dark matter.

    If this is true, than I imagine nothing we can detect can be broken up into dark matter.
    Yet.

    There are still hopes to detect something at CERN or in other experiments that are based on the conversion between dark and "normal" matter.

    If this is true, would the only way to detect dark matter would be through its gravitational affects or by imparting momentum to some other particle, however rare this may be.
    Certainly true so far.

  3. #3
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    Right. If dark matter consists of particles of some kind, they pretty much can't interact via electromagnetism or the strong force, or we'd see them. They could be like neutrinos, interacting through the weak force, which means that in principle we could see them in experiments with particle accelerators. But it's also possible that they don't even interact via the weak force, which means that unless they interact via some fifth fundamental force (maybe one specific to dark matter), they might only be detectable by their gravitational influence. And gravity is weak enough that, if that were the case, we'd probably never be able to detect the individual particles directly.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

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