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Thread: Nova mass change

  1. #1
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    Nova mass change

    Does a nova always gain mass with each complete eruption cycle, or could some lose mass?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  2. #2
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    The accretion of mass from a white dwarf's companion is what initiates the nova in the first place, after which some mass is ejected from the star.

    I believe the remainder has less mass, and the accretion cycle begins gain.

  3. #3
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    I thought gaining mass was a SN Ia model?
    Or is it just very massive white dwarfs that can gain mass?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    I thought gaining mass was a SN Ia model?
    This supernova model has the white dwarf accreting mass from its neighbor until it reaches that specific mass (in most cases) of about 1.4 solar masses, whereupon it blows and sends mass out at relativistic speeds. So it depends on what stage of this model one is talking as to mass gains and loses.

    It will brighten depending on the impact of the neighbor's mass flow onto the disk, which can glow even in the x-ray band. But this itself isn't anything close to a nova or supernova event.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  5. #5
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    At least in some models, loss is much more common than gain, though both can occur.
    An intriguing issue related to the investigation of novae is the question of the ultimate fate of the WD. Will it be losing or gaining mass after multiple successive cycles? Will it be able to reach MCh thus acting as a possible SNIa precursor, or not? The ratio mej/macc is shown in Fig. 6 for all parameter combinations. We note that it falls below unity only in a small region of the parameter space, thus strongly reducing the possibility of SNIa to result from accreting WDs.
    Grant Hutchison

  6. #6
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    Sorry, are we talking novae? Or supernovae?
    The OP specifies novae.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveC426913 View Post
    Sorry, are we talking novae? Or supernovae?
    The OP specifies novae.
    Yes, novae. Specifically, recurrent novae. Which, if the white dwarf gains mass with each cycle, are potential progenitor systems for Type Ia supernovae.

    Grant Hutchison

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