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Thread: The advantages of being left-handed

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    I remember reading in a sports article long ago that left-handed bowlers have an advantage.

    In a tournament, most of the rolls are by right-handers, and they follow a predictable path as the bowler aims for the "pocket." This results in the varnish finish wearing down on that side of the alley, whereas the opposite side stays shiny. I guess that side is less prone to deflecting the ball's path, and thus more consistent.

    I never heard that point raised again, however, so it may be just someone's wild theory.
    The reminds me of a fellow worker on a bowling team who rolled 300s, occasionally, left handed. We were more impressed when he said he was right-handed. [Speaking of Inigo Montoya. ]
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  2. #32
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    My father and his twin were LH and forced to write RH, they both stuttered, I assume from that experience. My uncle became an architect and could draw LH while writing RH at the same time and both could type very fast, being in that generation. In engineering there are both LH and RH tinsnips so you get used to both, if you do sheet metal. One thing i notice is the twisted way some lefties write with a pen, to avoid smudges I guess, hand over the top, i had to use wet ink but never developed that habit. I was delighted to see that Da Vinci used a silver metal tip to write, and that can only pull, so he was actually adept at both mirror writing and normal to use that tool. As a famous lefty he just did it to avoid pushing the sharp point into the prepared paper. It gave those wonderfully thin lines, but must have infuriated other lefties at the time.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    I remember reading in a sports article long ago that left-handed bowlers have an advantage.

    In a tournament, most of the rolls are by right-handers, and they follow a predictable path as the bowler aims for the "pocket." This results in the varnish finish wearing down on that side of the alley, whereas the opposite side stays shiny. I guess that side is less prone to deflecting the ball's path, and thus more consistent.

    I never heard that point raised again, however, so it may be just someone's wild theory.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    The way I heard it was that the wearing down of the varnish causes the ball to hook more which the bowlers like, so left-handers are at a disadvantage because it takes longer for them to wear it down.
    Actually, there is oil that is most of the way down the lane. The ball skids through this part and then starts hooking when it gets to the drier part at the end. Some balls will move this oil farther down the lane, some will absorb the oil, while I think all balls will fling some of it away. This all makes the ball react differently so the bowler has to adjust how they throw the ball. Obviously, the more bowlers throwing at the same part of the lane, the quicker the oil pattern changes, and the more adjustments need to be made. It seems to me that there are more right handed bowlers so for lefties, the oil doesn't change as quickly. If they have a good shot, they can use it for longer giving them an advantage. Of course, if there is a really difficult oil pattern, it can change faster for righties making good shots easier to get quicker than for the lefty.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Interesting. I haven't owned a pair of trousers with two hip pockets for twenty years, since I gave up wearing jeans.
    I have to say I was also confused by what you had written earlier. I don’t remember ever wearing trousers where the pockets were different on the left and right side. I basically exclusively own chino pants.


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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I have to say I was also confused by what you had written earlier. I don’t remember ever wearing trousers where the pockets were different on the left and right side. I basically exclusively own chino pants.
    I've never really understood what chinos are, but that's just me.
    I buy clothes rarely, but my suit trousers have a single hip pocket on the right, my casual trousers have a single hip pocket on the right, and my hiking trousers have a single hip pocket on the right, or none at all. I'm not actually sure what I'd do with two hip pockets - I don't every carry much I'm prepared to sit on.

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've never really understood what chinos are, but that's just me.
    Not a well defined term, I think but simply a casual pant typically made of cotton twill fabric. Contrary to your experience, I can’t recall owning a pair that didn’t have two hip pockets. I carry my billfold in the left, and a slimmer ID ‘flipper’ in the right.
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  7. #37
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    The advantages of being left-handed

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've never really understood what chinos are, but that's just me.
    Hmm, chinos are like jeans but they use lighter thread, so they’re more delicate, and they are often dyed brown or navy so you can wear them instead of wool or polyester pants to work. They sometimes are made with plaits, which I don’t think jeans really ever have. So I think they are kind of an alternative to wool for hot climates. They are really common in IT businesses.


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  8. #38
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    Thanks guys. I sort of vaguely knew the definition, I just wouldn't be able to identify a pair of chinos in the wild, as it were (of which, more in a moment).

    Anyway, since the idea of trousers with a single hip pocket seems to be a source of wonderment in some quarters, I chucked a few samples from my wardrobe on the bed and took a photo, much to my wife's bemusement. Sorry about the poor focus, but it does the required job:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Standard right-hand position, you'll note. I actually seem to own a pair of chinos, according to the label (pale trousers on the left), but they, too, have a single hip pocket.

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Not a well defined term, I think but simply a casual pant typically made of cotton twill fabric. Contrary to your experience, I can’t recall owning a pair that didn’t have two hip pockets. I carry my billfold in the left, and a slimmer ID ‘flipper’ in the right.
    This bit of trivia drifted up from my memory when I saw the comments about chinos; the name stems from the Spanish pantalones chinos, or Chinese pants. That much I knew, but Wikipedia fills in the details:

    Etymology
    As the cloth itself was originally made in China, the trousers were known in Spanish as pantalones chinos (Chinese pants), which became shortened to simply "chinos" in English.[1]

    History
    First designed to be used in the military and then taken up by civilians, chino fabric was originally made to be simple, durable and comfortable for soldiers to wear; the use of natural earth-tone colors also began the move towards camouflage, instead of the brightly colored tunics used prior. The British and then American armies started wearing it as standard during the latter half of the 1800s.[1]

    The pure-cotton fabric is widely used for trousers, referred to as chinos. The original khaki (light brown) is the traditional and most popular color, but chinos are made in many shades.[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chino_cloth

  10. #40
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    I was just going to say most people around here call them "khakis", even if they aren't that color.
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  11. #41
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    I may have mentioned this before...

    When I was attending university the standard speakers' setup in most lecture theatres was a podium with an overhead projector on either side. The projectors were equipped with a roll of acetate or similar clear material on which the speaker could use a pen to illustrate. With most professors being right-handed, most used the projector on their right.

    During one of my classes near the end of the year, the right side projector that the professor had been using all year died after a bright flash and loud bang. He simply turned on the left side projector, took his pen in his left hand, and without any other comment continued writing his notes. I'd heard of ambidexterity, but never met anyone with the ability. This otherwise unremarkable lecturer now seemed quite cool.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I'd heard of ambidexterity, but never met anyone with the ability. This otherwise unremarkable lecturer now seemed quite cool.
    I imagine this is something he must have trained himself to do, because I don’t think you can write smoothly even with your dominant hand without some training. From personal experience, I can use chopsticks well now with my dominant hand, but when I first did it in my twenties it wasn’t so easy.


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  13. #43
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    Here is when things get interesting
    https://www.athleticsnation.com/2015...itcher-faces-a

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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Here is when things get interesting
    https://www.athleticsnation.com/2015...itcher-faces-a
    The famous amphibious pitcher!

    https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthr...65#post2293565

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I imagine this is something he must have trained himself to do, because I don’t think you can write smoothly even with your dominant hand without some training.
    Probably. Nevertheless, I was impressed by the nonchalance about the situation and the smooth transition from one hand to the other. It was really unexpected.

    From personal experience, I can use chopsticks well now with my dominant hand, but when I first did it in my twenties it wasn’t so easy.
    I had a similar experience with chopsticks and prefer to use them when eating in a Chinese restaurant.

  16. #46
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    I write fairly well with my right hand, though mainly in mirror-writing - the conventional movement feels very unnatural. I did spend a lot of time practising when I was a kid, round about the same time I tried to teach myself to read braille. The former worked better than the latter, since I didn't have a clue what I was doing with the braille thing. And it seems to have stuck fairly well - something about practising specific fine muscle movements seems to groove them in for decades.

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I write fairly well with my right hand, though mainly in mirror-writing - the conventional movement feels very unnatural. I did spend a lot of time practising when I was a kid, round about the same time I tried to teach myself to read braille. The former worked better than the latter, since I didn't have a clue what I was doing with the braille thing. And it seems to have stuck fairly well - something about practising specific fine muscle movements seems to groove them in for decades.

    Grant Hutchison
    A good argument for children learning piano, or any two handed instrument. I guess people will have amazing thumb dexterity and the LH equivalent , levulosity? Thanks to gaming and texting.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    A good argument for children learning piano, or any two handed instrument. I guess people will have amazing thumb dexterity and the LH equivalent , levulosity? Thanks to gaming and texting.
    You can be dextrous with either hand, despite the etymology. Hence, ambidextrous. The opposite of which is ambisinistrous or ambilaevous, meaning "equally clumsy with either hand".

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    You can be dextrous with either hand, despite the etymology. Hence, ambidextrous. The opposite of which is ambisinistrous or ambilaevous, meaning "equally clumsy with either hand".

    Grant Hutchison
    Thanks, I will try to include ambilaevous into my future conversations, I can see an opportunity coming up when i watch the Rugby world cup match that coincides with my annual weekend with a small bunch fellow surviving school alumni. As a lefty it will be a convoluted duty!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  20. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    You can be dextrous with either hand, despite the etymology. Hence, ambidextrous. The opposite of which is ambisinistrous or ambilaevous, meaning "equally clumsy with either hand".
    I am going to try to use "ambisinistrous", especially around my younger brother. He's left-handed, so the left-handed=sinister connotation is a source of endless amusement for me.
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  21. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I imagine this is something he must have trained himself to do, because I don’t think you can write smoothly even with your dominant hand without some training. From personal experience, I can use chopsticks well now with my dominant hand, but when I first did it in my twenties it wasn’t so easy.


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    Sometimes ambidexterity is forced.

    A number of years ago when I was working for the international, blue monolith technology company, I took a class which was basically a marketing course (80 credit hours) crammed into two weeks. With tests and homework. The fellows teaching the course were from Trinity College and one of them had endured a stroke or other cerebral event several years previously and had to learn how to write and chart and draw left-handed although he was naturally right-handed. He did darned well.

  22. #52
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    Playing guitar requires very different, yet precise, use of each hand. I can't remember whether, when I first picked one up as a child, I naturally chose to hold the neck with my left hand. As a right-handed person, I have difficulty imagining playing it the other way around.

    My youngest daughter, our artist, is left-handed. I have a series of photos of her with a newly-received easel when she was 23 months old. The first two photos show her drawing with a marker in her right hand. Taken a few minutes later, another photo shows her holding it in her left hand. The die was cast...

  23. #53
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    My older son is left handed. His wife is left handed. When their daughter was born he kept trying to urge her to go leftie. Didn't take.

    When I started little league baseball I tried switch hitting. Since pitchers were almost exclusively right handed I batted left a lot. It became "normal" and I now bat left and golf left. (My right eye is dominant which helps.) Everything else is rightie.
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    In his later years, the renowned illustrator Frank Frazetta had his right hand crippled by a stroke. He learned to draw with his left hand and turned out credible work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    My older son is left handed. His wife is left handed. When their daughter was born he kept trying to urge her to go leftie. Didn't take.

    When I started little league baseball I tried switch hitting. Since pitchers were almost exclusively right handed I batted left a lot. It became "normal" and I now bat left and golf left. (My right eye is dominant which helps.) Everything else is rightie.
    If you bat or golf right-handed, doesn't most of the power come from the left arm and control from the right? Seems like if you get sufficient power from the non-dominant hand (I wouldn't), why not switch it up?
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