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Thread: Question about French bread

  1. #1
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    Question about French bread

    This is a question that hopefully some French members will see. I was looking up "batard" and I noticed that there is no page (either in English or French) on Wikipedia for that type of bread. In Japan at least it is used very commonly (though of course people don't know what the word really means). I'm wondering, it is just because batards are not very commonly eaten in France, or is it that the word itself has gone out of fashion because of the bad connotation?
    As above, so below

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    This is a question that hopefully some French members will see. I was looking up "batard" and I noticed that there is no page (either in English or French) on Wikipedia for that type of bread. In Japan at least it is used very commonly (though of course people don't know what the word really means). I'm wondering, it is just because batards are not very commonly eaten in France, or is it that the word itself has gone out of fashion because of the bad connotation?
    Try here:

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/b%C3%A2tard

    Fascinating. Makes me hungry.

  3. #3
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    Yeah, I saw the page on Wiktionary. But there isn't one on Wikipedia.
    As above, so below

  4. #4
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    I assume that you have seen this Wikipedia entry which gives a very, very basic definition and refers you to the entry for Baguette which gives a slightly fuller description?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batard

    I seem to remember seeing them for sale in France the last time we were there - in 2013. Other sites also seem to indicate that they are available but not really described too much as they are just "a half-length normal loaf" https://about-france.com/french-bread.htm
    Last edited by ozduck; 2019-Oct-18 at 05:26 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I assume that you have seen this Wikipedia entry which gives a very, very basic definition and refers you to the entry for Baguette which gives a slightly fuller description?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batard
    Yeah, that was the first page I went to, and then when I clicked on the break article, it took me to wiktionary rather than wikipedia, which is what piqued my interest. If you go to the article on baguettes there is a description of different bread types, and they mention ficelles (with a link) and boules (also with a link), but there are no links for either flutes or batards (since the pages don't exist). I'm no so interested in reading the article (actually I just wanted to make sure that the etymology I had heard was correct), but I am kind of interested in why there is no page--whether it's because it's a minor kind of bread in France or because it's not completely PC.
    As above, so below

  6. #6
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    I asked about it. Apparently there is a joke about bakers making Batards at five in the morning. It’s a short fatter version of a Baguette or french stick. So just a hint of vulgarity but a word that has lost its stinging significance. What do they call a six inch sub in the early hours?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I asked about it. Apparently there is a joke about bakers making Batards at five in the morning.
    That's a line from a famous and unaccountably popular Jacques Dutronc song, Il est cinq heures, Paris s'éveille.

    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    It’s a short fatter version of a Baguette or french stick.
    Supposedly born of a miscegenation between a baguette and a round loaf, hence the name.

    I've certainly seen them on sale in France, in a bin marked Bâtards, so evidently not very taboo.

    Grant Hutchison

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