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Thread: Can a microscopic black hole absorb exactly 1 quark?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    Can a microscopic black hole absorb exactly 1 quark?

    Hello, this is kind of an odd question I had a few days ago and I'm not sure what the answer is. Here is the setup:

    Imagine you have a microscopic black hole (MBH), perhaps one you made in a particle accelerator. I know that Hawking radiation will cause it to evaporate on some insanely short timescale, but bear with me. It will be far, far smaller then a proton and so could easily zip right into the middle of a subatomic particle.

    Assuming I'm right so far, lets say that this MBH drifted inside a Meson composed of 2 quarks. Before the MBH can evaporate, it absorbs exactly one of the quarks. What happens to the other one? The standard model tells us that a single quark cannot exist in isolation, so what would happen to it? Would the remaining quark just vanish in a puff of energy since it's partner no longer exists? Does another quark spontaneously generate next to it to prevent it from being an isolated quark (if so, where would the energy for it come from)? Do the 2 quarks somehow remain connected despite one of them being inside a black hole?

    I know there are serious practical limitations on this thought experiment, such as a MBH evaporating so quickly that it may just not be possible to move close enough to another particle to absorb it in time. But thanks to anyone that can provide some insight!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Generally speaking, any method of trying to remove a single quark from a multi-quark particle requires an input of energy. As more energy is put into the system, there can be enough to create quark-antiquark pairs, and at this point, you end up not with an individual quark but with a meson or baryon. This would still hold even if you're using the gravity of a black hole as your method for trying to pull the quarks apart.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  3. #3
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    An interesting consideration: what happens to micro-black holes in a quark-gluon plasma? Still a long way from Planck scale, so quantum gravity may not be important ...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grey View Post
    Generally speaking, any method of trying to remove a single quark from a multi-quark particle requires an input of energy. As more energy is put into the system, there can be enough to create quark-antiquark pairs, and at this point, you end up not with an individual quark but with a meson or baryon. This would still hold even if you're using the gravity of a black hole as your method for trying to pull the quarks apart.
    Ok, thank you. But in this particular case were would that extra energy come from? The MBH itself? If so, is it something like as the MBH is absorbing one quark, it is also loosing energy and is creating a new quark at the same time?

    Also, unlike in a normal particle accelerator situation where you are physically moving 2 quarks further apart, a MBH absorbing a quark while inside a Meson isn't increasing the separation between the 2 quarks. And my understanding with the strong force is that as long as the quarks remain close together, the binding energy won't increase. Does that make sense?

  5. #5
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    The mass of the absorbed quark is greater than the rest mass of a quark; it is also the binding energy, too. That overage will produce a quark that can escape with it's partner.
    Solfe

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