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Thread: Bedtime breathing betterments

  1. #1
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    Bedtime breathing betterments

    Especially during the winter when the bedroom temperature is around, roughly 68F, when I lie down on the bed I can often become congested and breathing is a problem for me since I don't breath at all through my mouth. I discovered that if I pull the covers over my exposed ear -- I always sleep on my side -- that within in a minute or so, I can breath easily, even if just one nostril. Though I've done this more than a dozen times now with seemingly faithful results, this hypothesis needs better testing.

    Is this a trick that is generally, or less than generally, known? It doesn't seem to be psychological. Does lower blood viscosity in the ear, by warming with the covers, enhance the flow of the "good guys" that help unclog the plumbing?

    Anyone else notice this?
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  2. #2
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    It won't have anything to do with blood viscosity, that's for sure.
    I'd guess that covering your ear brings the blankets closer to your nose, and you get the advantage of rebreathing a bit of warmed and humidified air from in front of your face.

    Certainly never heard of it before. For me, it falls into the category of "weird stuff patients tell you about when you're actually trying to find out something different".

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    I discovered that if I pull the covers over my exposed ear -- I always sleep on my side -- that within in a minute or so, I can breath easily, even if just one nostril. Though I've done this more than a dozen times now with seemingly faithful results, this hypothesis needs better testing.
    Have you tried laying down or turning over without the blanket to see what happens? I notice that when I turn over, resting on my side, often the lower nostril will close up and the upper one will open up after a few minutes. I’d guess it might be due to some fluid in the nasal cavities but I don’t know.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    It won't have anything to do with blood viscosity, that's for sure.
    I'd guess that covering your ear brings the blankets closer to your nose, and you get the advantage of rebreathing a bit of warmed and humidified air from in front of your face.
    Yes, I wondered if that was the better answer, and it is easily tested, so I will. [I did attempt a test for this, but my ear was cold, so...]

    Certainly never heard of it before. For me, it falls into the category of "weird stuff patients tell you about when you're actually trying to find out something different".
    Yeah, it's odd but it might prove useful to others, assuming those who test it have positive results.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Have you tried laying down or turning over without the blanket to see what happens? I notice that when I turn over, resting on my side, often the lower nostril will close up and the upper one will open up after a few minutes. I’d guess it might be due to some fluid in the nasal cavities but I don’t know.
    I haven't noticed that, but gravity makes that circumstance logical. I'll look for that happening to me in the nights ahead.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  6. #6
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    I have severe sleep apnea, and I sleep sitting up on a sofa. Soft palate drops, feels good.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #7
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    My heart jumps a bit when I first go to bed. Potassium tablets help with that.

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