Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Radcliffe wave

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Point Clear, Essex,UK
    Posts
    522

    Radcliffe wave

    Is is probable that this molecular cloud system is much longer than the quoted size of 9000 light years?
    This size looks to match the limits of our data on dust in the plane of the galaxy.
    Could it stretch for most of the length of the spiral arm?
    Twitter https://twitter.com/CarlNGraham -- Carl N Graham -- Sci-fi blog: The Alien Reporter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Is that the new area in our galaxy that has Newley formed stars? Since it is so close to us is it possible at some point it can cause issues for us?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Point Clear, Essex,UK
    Posts
    522
    Don't know about any issues for us.
    It looks to change the way star formation is modelled in this galaxy as it seems to indicate that the Gould Belt is part of a much larger structure.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radcliffe_wave

    It could maybe have an impact on the history of our solar system and possibly the origin of interstellar comets. (Maybe)
    Twitter https://twitter.com/CarlNGraham -- Carl N Graham -- Sci-fi blog: The Alien Reporter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    9,415
    PatTastic I guess you have a link to a paper or something to clarify what you are talking about?
    All comments made in red are moderator comments. Please, read the rules of the forum here, the special rules for the ATM section here and conspiracy theories. If you think a post is inappropriate, don't comment on it in thread but report it using the /!\ button in the lower left corner of each message. But most of all, have fun!

    Catch me on twitter: @tusenfem
    Catch Rosetta Plasma Consortium on twitter: @Rosetta_RPC

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,360
    Article from Nature discussing the Gould Belt and Radcliff Wave.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1874-z.epdf
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    13,121
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Article from Nature discussing the Gould Belt and Radcliff Wave.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1874-z.epdf
    Thanks. I would have called it a wall but, on the otherhand, it looks surfable as a wave. Their use of "period" seems to be their term for wavelength.

    How does one make such a "kinematically coherent structure"? Would an obliquely, pass-through spiral galaxy's arm impacting a MW's arm create such a confined and bouncy thing?
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    8,684
    This is fascinating.

    The 'Radcliffe Wave' extends all along the Orion Spur, from Canis Major to Cygnus X-1 and beyond, and approaches Sol at its closest in Orion; here the wave is significantly below the galactic plane (but it extends well above the plane in Cepheus, further along the arm). This seems to clarify a lot of the local galactic structure, to my mind at least.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Point Clear, Essex,UK
    Posts
    522
    Some people think it corresponds strongly to similar structures spotted in the IR in spiral arms of other galaxies.
    If this is true then these structures probably form the spiral arms.

    Loads of models being suggest.
    The ones I understand suggest a more dynamic nature to galaxy development, possibly with the gas above and below the plane of disk rotating faster than the stars.
    Twitter https://twitter.com/CarlNGraham -- Carl N Graham -- Sci-fi blog: The Alien Reporter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,161
    Universe Today story here, although it doesn't use the name the researchers are the same.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Universe Today story here, although it doesn't use the name the researchers are the same
    Not sure if a good thing or bad thing lol

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Not sure if a good thing or bad thing lol
    Good thing, to find stuff out. Can't be a bad thing.

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA (near Washington, DC)
    Posts
    8,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Not sure if a good thing or bad thing lol
    Or perhaps indifferent? The galaxy is what it its, and we are learning about more details as our observation ability continues to increase.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA (near Washington, DC)
    Posts
    8,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Or perhaps indifferent? The galaxy is what it its, and we are learning about more details as our observation ability continues to increase.
    Addendum: I see Grant posted simultaneously. In response I would say our improving observations are definitely a good thing.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    I guess the wording of passing through kind of throws it off for me

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    I guess the wording of passing through kind of throws it off for me
    The Universe Today article says "passing through" the Milky Way. Lots of things pass through the Milky Way - spiral arms, globular clusters ... These things happen on a grand scale and over very long time periods. Even the closest gas cloud hypothesized to form part of this Radcliffe Wave is hundreds of lightyears from us.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Point Clear, Essex,UK
    Posts
    522
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Universe Today story here, although it doesn't use the name the researchers are the same.
    There has been a lot of debate on social media as to if the Gould belt & Radcliffe wave are really the same thing.
    If they are the same then the Gould belt just got an order of magnitude bigger.

    Isn't it more like: one is a known belt of star formation around the galaxy the other is a structure in a spiral arm, that might be repeated in all spiral arms?

    I first noticed it on Twitter as a Phd student proclaiming the Gould belt the subject of his paper had died.
    Twitter https://twitter.com/CarlNGraham -- Carl N Graham -- Sci-fi blog: The Alien Reporter

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    8,684
    I made this map sometime in 2014, showing the fictional extent of the Orion's Arm civilisation; if you ignore the green boundary, most of the data on this map is relatively accurate. The Radcliffe Wave can be clearly seen (although I admit I've enhanced it somewhat)
    https://scontent-lht6-1.xx.fbcdn.net...c1&oe=5EDBFB0B

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,360
    More on the Gould Belt, new paper.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.08748

    A Galactic-scale gas wave in the Solar Neighborhood
    Joćo Alves, Catherine Zucker, Alyssa A. Goodman, Joshua S. Speagle, Stefan Meingast, Thomas Robitaille, Douglas P. Finkbeiner, Edward F. Schlafly, Gregory M. Green
    (Submitted on 23 Jan 2020)

    For the past 150 years, the prevailing view of the local Interstellar Medium (ISM) was based on a peculiarity known as the Gould's Belt, an expanding ring of young stars, gas, and dust, tilted about 20∘ to the Galactic plane. Still, the physical relation between local gas clouds has remained practically unknown because the distance accuracy to clouds is of the same order or larger than their sizes. With the advent of large photometric surveys and the Gaia satellite astrometric survey this situation has changed. Here we report the 3-D structure of all local cloud complexes. We find a narrow and coherent 2.7 kpc arrangement of dense gas in the Solar neighborhood that contains many of the clouds thought to be associated with the Gould Belt. This finding is inconsistent with the notion that these clouds are part of a ring, disputing the Gould Belt model. The new structure comprises the majority of nearby star-forming regions, has an aspect ratio of about 1:20, and contains about 3 million solar masses of gas. Remarkably, the new structure appears to be undulating and its 3-D distribution is well described by a damped sinusoidal wave on the plane of the Milky Way, with an average period of about 2 kpc and a maximum amplitude of about 160 pc. Our results represent a first step in the revision of the local gas distribution and Galactic structure and offer a new, broader context to studies on the transformation of molecular gas into stars.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •