Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 59

Thread: Can someone explain the article below in layman terms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395

    Can someone explain the article below in layman terms

    Hello was reading this article and I do not understand it and not sure what it is trying to say

    https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.live...noization.html

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,499
    The early Universe went through a period when it was too hot for atoms to form, and everything was ionized. Then it cooled enough to allow atoms to form (mainly hydrogen and helium), but stars had not yet formed (the so-called "Cosmic Dark Age"). Then, when stars did form, their ultraviolet light started to ionize the gas around these early galaxies. So that was a change from the Cosmic Dark Age (no starlight) to the "Epoch of Reionization" (the cold gas being ionized by starlight).
    The article is saying that astronomers have now observed light coming from the very early galaxies which formed right at the start of (and caused) Reionization.

    So it all happened a very long time ago, despite the bizarre use of the present tense in the article. Nothing to worry about.

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Thank you but what does it mean

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,499
    I thought I just told you what it meant. We've now been able to detect evidence of a particular event in the evolution of the Universe, one that we'd been able to deduce from theory but had not yet observed. And it all happened a very long time ago.
    What was unclear?

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    The title part where it Says before our eyes is throwing me off.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2,246
    Was early Dark Ages world opaque only to far ultraviolet (Lyman lines and continuum) or also opaque to near UV and visible (due to scattering)?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    The title part where it Says before our eyes is throwing me off.
    Bizarre use of present tense, as I said.
    The light we are now receiving from these galaxies was emitted by them billions of years ago. So we're seeing events that happened billions of years ago, in the very early evolution of the Universe.

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Thank you for the responses. I am trying to understand the lingo in the articles. So if I may ask what on the article brings you to the statement nothing g to worry about. This will give me a basis of things to look for in these articles.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    7,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Thank you for the responses. I am trying to understand the lingo in the articles. So if I may ask what on the article brings you to the statement nothing g to worry about. This will give me a basis of things to look for in these articles.
    Maybe the fact that the article doesn't mention any threat whatsoever?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    6,113
    Quote Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
    Was early Dark Ages world opaque only to far ultraviolet (Lyman lines and continuum) or also opaque to near UV and visible (due to scattering)?
    The period usually referred to as the "cosmic dark ages" was after the universe became cool enough for neutral atoms to form, at which time the universe became largely transparent to both visible and ultraviolet light, and the decoupled photons cooled enough to no longer be visible. At that point, light could travel easily through the universe, but since there were no stars, there were few sources of light to do so.
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    I get it so this galaxy is 680 millions years after the Big Bang, that means we are 680 millions years from feeling or see the effects of the Big Bang?

    So basically unless our technology gets a major upgrade the Big Bang time frame is 680 million years away

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,499
    We, right here and now in our galaxy, are 13.8 billion years after the Big Bang.
    We can detect radiation from 400,000 years after the Big Bang (the Cosmic Microwave Background). We have hints of the Cosmic Neutrino Background from one second after the Big Bang, but will need new technology to detect these neutrinos directly.

    Grant Hutchison

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    I see so these bubbles they speak of have hit the earth already or our coming towards us and will hit us in millions of years

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963

    Can someone explain the article below in layman terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    I see so these bubbles they speak of have hit the earth already or our coming towards us and will hit us in millions of years
    No, those plasma bubbles happened 13 billion years ago. They aren’t moving towards the Earth and have likely dissipated by now from around the galaxies in which they were observed. At its most basic, that was then, this is now.
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2020-Jan-14 at 10:58 PM. Reason: 13 billion, not 13.5

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    I am confused, if we see it that means it is getting closer so we can see it. We are seeing the bubbles from 13 billions years ago. So if we are seeing that does that not mean the light has travelled close enough that we can see it. And since universe is 13.8 billions years old does that not mean anything that happened at the Big Bang will reach is is a few millions years?

    I guess what I understand is if a rock flew towards the earth from the day of the Big Bang and we can see the light of that rock today that means the rock if moving at the speed of light would hit earth today. So if the light of this bubble which was millions of years after the Big Bang then the light from the Big Bang would reach us in a few million years?

    Basically light from the big bang and anything traveling at the speed of light from the Big Bang is reaching is now? Right
    Last edited by Sinbad; 2020-Jan-14 at 10:12 PM.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    I am confused, if we see it that means it is getting closer so we can see it. We are seeing the bubbles from 13 billions years ago. So if we are seeing that does that not mean the light has travelled close enough that we can see it. And since universe is 13.8 billions years old does that not mean anything that happened at the Big Bang will reach is is a few millions years?

    I guess what I understand is if a rock flew towards the earth from the day of the Big Bang and we can see the light of that rock today that means the rock if moving at the speed of light would hit earth today. So if the light of this bubble which was millions of years after the Big Bang then the light from the Big Bang would reach us in a few million years?

    Basically light from the big bang and anything traveling at the speed of light from the Big Bang is reaching is now? Right?
    We are seeing light that left those galaxies almost 13 billion years ago and seeing it now, not in millions of years. The light has taken that long to reach the Earth and is reaching us now. Strictly speaking we cannot see the light from the Big Bang, only the light that was created after ionization. We can measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to about 300,000 years after the Big Bang but that is not visible light.

    The galaxies mentioned in the story are not getting closer to us.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Ah so any light from the Big Bang will only reach us in millions of years then?

    I am not sure what a plasma bubble is, but if we see the plasma bubble now that means the plasma bubble just reach us no?

    And lastly the question above if the Big Bang happened 13.8 billion years ago will the light of the Big Bang not reach us in 13.8 billian years travelling at the speed of light then so I understand if I do if a rock propelled straight words the earth at the Big Bang that means if the rock travelling at the speed of light would reach us now right.
    Last edited by Sinbad; 2020-Jan-14 at 10:45 PM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Ah so any light from the Big Bang will only reach us in millions of years then?
    If a galaxy is 600 million light years away then it took 600 million years for that light to reach us. If the Big Bang emitted light it would have taken 13.8 billion years to reach us.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    I am not sure what a plasma bubble is, but if we see the plasma bubble now that means the plasma bubble just reach us no?
    Nope, only the light. The bubbles are long gone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    And lastly the question above if the Big Bang happened 13.8 billion years ago will the light of the Big Bang not reach us in 13.8 billian years travelling at the speed of light then so I understand if I do if a rock propelled straight words the earth at the Big Bang that means if the rock travelling at the speed of light would reach us now right.
    Doesn't matter if it's a light beam or a rock, they both need 13.8 billion years to arrive. And to be more accurate, we can see light which was emitted soon after the Big Bang but not at the time of the Big Bang.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    So has something from the Big Bang already reached us or will it reach us shortly or still in many years

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So has something from the Big Bang already reached us or will it reach us shortly or still in many years
    That something is light and it reaches us every day. Think of a telescope as a device that allows you to look back in time such as 13 billion years ago. You can't see what is happening now in your reference frame but you can see what happened then.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    So if 1 light year is 137 thousand years that means something the distance of let’s say time of Big Bang 13.8 billions years of us is 13.8 billion Time 137 thousand years to reach the earth?

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    So if 1 light year is 137 thousand years that means something the distance of letís say time of Big Bang 13.8 billions years of us is 13.8 billion Time 137 thousand years to reach the earth?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    My question basically may sound dumb because of my lack of knowledge but it is

    Of at the exact moment of the Big Bang which is the age of the universe 13.8 bill and years a rock expelled towards the earth would that rock have arrived yet, would it still be on its way and if still on it’s way by how many years?

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    My question basically may sound dumb because of my lack of knowledge but it is

    Of at the exact moment of the Big Bang which is the age of the universe 13.8 bill and years a rock expelled towards the earth would that rock have arrived yet, would it still be on its way and if still on itís way by how many years?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963
    A light year is a measure of the distance light travels in one year at 300,000 KM/second:

    a unit of astronomical distance equivalent to the distance that light travels in one year, which is 9.4607 ◊ 1012 km (nearly 6 trillion miles).
    And try the Wikipedia article for the basics:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-year

    So your comment about one light year being equal to 137 thousand years is meaningless.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    Of at the exact moment of the Big Bang which is the age of the universe 13.8 bill and years a rock expelled towards the earth would that rock have arrived yet, would it still be on its way and if still on it’s way by how many years?

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    2,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Of at the exact moment of the Big Bang which is the age of the universe 13.8 bill and years a rock expelled towards the earth would that rock have arrived yet, would it still be on its way and if still on it’s way by how many years?
    I think you are caught in a common trap. The Big Bang was something that took place long ago but NOT far away because it happened all over when spacetime was created. And the universe continues to expand from that event. So your analogy of the rock doesn't work.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    So since in theory that’s the case the rock would have hit us and possible long long ago then from the point the Big Bang May have started

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,499
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So since in theory that’s the case the rock would have hit us and possible long long ago then from the point the Big Bang May have started
    The Big Bang started everywhere. We've been receiving photons originating from shortly after it occurred, from all directions, continuously throughout the history of the Earth. Those photons are coming from farther and farther away as time goes by. If the Big Bang chucked out rocks (it didn't) we'd also have been receiving rocks from the Big Bang for the entire history of the Earth - rocks that were slow-moving or had farther to travel would arrive later.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    395
    I get it so these galaxies which are 680 million years older than the Big Bang have just reached us so ewe are still 680 million years away from remmenants of the start of the big bang after these galaxies were formed.

    Are these the furthest we have ever seen 680 million years after the Big Bang

    Though I still don’t understand these expanding plasma bubbles that jut reached us

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •