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Thread: Mars and Humans

  1. #31
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    So why are we trying to go there in a few years

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So why are we trying to go there in a few years
    For the same reason George Mallory wished to climb Mt. Everest. "Because it is there."

  4. #34
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    Addendum: Not to mention the specifics I mentioned in my first post.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So why are we trying to go there in a few years
    I think people have been answering that question already in this thread, but a couple of other thoughts:

    from NASA / JPL
    After Earth, Mars is the planet with the most hospitable climate in the solar system. So hospitable that it may once have harbored primitive, bacteria-like life. Outflow channels and other geologic features provide ample evidence that billions of years ago liquid water flowed on the surface of Mars. Although liquid water may still exist deep below the surface of Mars, currently the temperature is too low and the atmosphere too thin for liquid water to exist at the surface.

    What caused the change in Mars' climate? Were the conditions necessary for life to originate ever present on Mars? Could there be bacteria in the subsurface alive today? These are the questions that lead us to explore Mars. The climate of Mars has obviously cooled dramatically. By studying the reasons for climate change on Mars, which lacks the complications of oceans, a biosphere, and industrial contaminants, we may begin to understand the forces driving climate change on Earth. As we begin to explore the universe and search for planets in other solar systems, we must first ask the question 'Did life occur on another planet in our own solar system?' and 'What are the minimal conditions necessary for the formation of life?'
    From ESA
    Mars is an obvious target for exploration because it is close by in our Solar System, but there are many more reasons to explore the Red Planet. The scientific reasons for going to Mars can be summarised by the search for life, understanding the surface and the planetís evolution, and preparing for future human exploration.
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  6. #36
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    Humans on mars would be pretty limited because the surface isn't much compatible with human life. Perhaps it could be terraformed with the right mix of microbiology and human made chemicals.
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  7. #37
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    Like total recall have bases setup lol

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Like total recall have bases setup lol
    Bases on Mars would need to have human habitation largely underground to protect against cosmic radiation, because in real life, most "mutants" don't live. Also, cancer.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  9. #39
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    So Mars has massive radioactive atmosphere

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So Mars has massive radioactive atmosphere
    No, not quite. The atmosphere is not the source.

    Cosmic rays come from deep space, as stars and other phenomena (not a danger to us!) emit ions (charged particles). Mars has more of them than the surface of Earth because our thicker atmosphere screens out the particles. Mars' atmosphere is too thin to stop many.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    So Mars has massive radioactive atmosphere
    Not radioactive, or at least not significantly more radioactive than our atmosphere (which only contains a limited quantity of radioisotopes). It just is very thin so doesn’t protect as well as Earth’s atmosphere from radiation coming from space.

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  12. #42
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    Do you think that this would actually be possible in our lifetimes or would it be future generations able to travel here

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Do you think that this would actually be possible in our lifetimes or would it be future generations able to travel here
    We could likely travel to Mars and establish a small base there using technology that we have today, or reasonable extrapolations from it (i.e., we might need to design new rockets or space vehicles, but we would not need to assume some new technology or materials that we can't be sure we could make). If a major country or corporation decided to make an "Apollo program" level of commitment to landing humans on Mars, there's no reason that it could not be done within our lifetimes. I know Elon Musk is hoping that SpaceX will be sending humans to Mars in the coming decade (we'll see if he actually meets that schedule).
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Do you think that this would actually be possible in our lifetimes or would it be future generations able to travel here
    Yes. There are technical issues, but the main problem is cost. SpaceX has been pursuing a variety of methods to lower launch costs, and regardless of how far they get themselves, they have woken up the industry and governments. The launch industry has been notorious about being very conservative about trying new ideas and lack of innovation when it comes to lowering cost.

    I expect there will be a revolution in space development in the next couple of decades. We are seeing the start of it now.

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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinbad View Post
    Do you think that this would actually be possible in our lifetimes or would it be future generations able to travel here
    I'm certain that it's possible to get humans to Mars and back within my lifetime (which means in the next 25 years or so; I'm 66) if the funding is made available. I think the chances of a privately-funded human expedition to Mars in that period is roughly nil.
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