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Thread: Who decided that in the future we'd all be wearing form-fitting clothing?

  1. #31
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    I want to live in the H.G. Wells future, where they dress like this.
    https://7wallpapers.net/wp-content/u...ond-Massey.jpg

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    I want to live in the H.G. Wells future, where they dress like this.
    https://7wallpapers.net/wp-content/u...ond-Massey.jpg
    But not the Fritz Lang future:
    https://www.alamy.com/photographic-p...241557147.html

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It was mostly a 70s/80s phenomenon.
    Was there much form-fitting in the original Star Wars trilogy? I don't remember much, apart from the rightly mocked brass bikini inflicted on poor Carrie Fisher, which certainly wasn't there because anyone imagined, "that's how we'll dress in the future".

    Grant Hutchison

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Was there much form-fitting in the original Star Wars trilogy? I don't remember much, apart from the rightly mocked brass bikini inflicted on poor Carrie Fisher, which certainly wasn't there because anyone imagined, "that's how we'll dress in the future".
    Well, of course not - "Star Wars" was "a long time ago," not in the future!
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    Well, of course not - "Star Wars" was "a long time ago," not in the future!
    Legally, in the UK, they're set in the future. (See para.43 of the Supreme Court ruling.)
    One can reasonably argue that starting the movie with "a long time ago" doesn't indicate that the events happened before our present day, but before the imaginary narrative viewpoint, in which the stories are recounted as near-legendary events of the deep past--it's certainly a very common science fiction trope, and I confess it's how I always thought of the films. I was actually a little surprised to learn that people took "a long time ago" literally.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2020-Feb-10 at 02:14 PM.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Legally, in the UK, they're set in the future. (See para.43 of the Supreme Court ruling.)]
    In US law, at least, I'm pretty sure that would be considered dicta, and not legally binding in other cases.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    One can reasonably argue that starting the movie with "a long time ago" doesn't indicate that the events happened before our present day, but before the imaginary narrative viewpoint, in which the stories are recounted as near-legendary events of the deep past--it's certainly a very common science fiction trope, and I confess it's how I always thought of the films. I was actually a little surprised to learn that people took "a long time ago" literally.

    Grant Hutchison
    Well, I was just joking, hence the grinning smilie. But if I weren't, I'd point out that "in a galaxy far, far away" means it's not our future, regardless.

    Although I suppose one could argue that within the "imaginary narrative viewpoint" of the films the Milky Way itself is a galaxy far, far away...that would serve to explain away the complaint that they shouldn't know what a "falcon" is, as well.
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  7. #37
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    I feel an impending infraction point for straying off topic ...

    Returning to previous discussion: if you look at, say, the 1970s (since that has been raised as a relevant decade), it seems to me it depends on what kind of future was being imagined, whether "form-fitting" clothing was used or not. Not much form-fitting in Soylent Green or Rollerball, for instance, but very much so in Logan's Run. It seems to me that the elite of repressive dystopias, and the brain-washed masses of bland utopias, go for the form-fitting look, but other imagined futures produce their own particular styles.

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Was there much form-fitting in the original Star Wars trilogy? I don't remember much, apart from the rightly mocked brass bikini inflicted on poor Carrie Fisher, which certainly wasn't there because anyone imagined, "that's how we'll dress in the future".

    Grant Hutchison
    That's one. But there were many American TV shows and films with the Spandex aesthetic contemporary with SW itself, certainly a lot of the visuals I'm familiar with. Probably different in the UK. (I don't know the OP's age or nationality.)
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  9. #39
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    Gene Roddenberry didn't believe there were zippers in the future, but somehow, everyone wore uniforms that couldn't be worn if you didn't use zippers.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    That's one. But there were many American TV shows and films with the Spandex aesthetic contemporary with SW itself, certainly a lot of the visuals I'm familiar with. Probably different in the UK. (I don't know the OP's age or nationality.)
    In the 70s and 80s here in the UK we had gritty TV dramas like 1990 and The Guardians (both set in future totalitarian British states, and both highly recommended by me at least), and low-budget science fiction like Moonbase 3 and Starcops. All of them went down the "dressed like us but with slightly different lapels, collars and fastenings" approach.

    The main form-fitting American series I remember from that time period is Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, which I always imagined was costumed as it was for reasons other than "that's how we'll dress in the future". (Rather closer to the motives for the costumes in Barbarella, in fact.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2020-Feb-10 at 05:27 PM.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by eburacum45 View Post
    I want to live in the H.G. Wells future, where they dress like this.
    https://7wallpapers.net/wp-content/u...ond-Massey.jpg
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  14. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    In the 70s and 80s here in the UK we had gritty TV dramas like 1990 and The Guardians (both set in future totalitarian British states, and both highly recommended by me at least), and low-budget science fiction like Moonbase 3 and Starcops. All of them went down the "dressed like us but with slightly different lapels, collars and fastenings" approach.

    The main form-fitting American series I remember from that time period is Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, which I always imagined was costumed as it was for reasons other than "that's how we'll dress in the future". (Rather closer to the motives for the costumes in Barbarella, in fact.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Of course in Blakes 7 you had a hodgepodge of outfits from Forest Rangers to Joan Collins in Space.

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    Last edited by ozduck; 2020-Feb-11 at 06:49 AM.

  15. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Of course in Blakes 7 you had a hodgepodge of outfits from Forest Rangers to Joan Collins in Space.
    Ah, I'd blotted out Blake's 7. For various reasons I never really engaged with it.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Ah, I'd blotted out Blake's 7. For various reasons I never really engaged with it.

    Grant Hutchison
    It was certainly not the best series I have ever watched and the main title character was written as monumental bore. However I enjoyed it, especially due to the high camp, beautiful but bad Servalan as performed by Jacqueline Pearce.

  17. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    And Blade Runner was Noir, deliberately aping the aesthetic of a past era.
    "The future is old"

  18. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    I've always been puzzled by that; as if vanity no longer existed in the future.

    Actually what's struck me about fashion is how little it's changed over the last century. True, we've had various ins and outs, but the sum total of what we wear has not changed since the invention of the sewing machine and synthetic fiber. It is truly striking in retrospect how much impact industrial sewing had on our dress preferences; tougher stitching meant we could ditch capes, cloaks and petticoats and just combine them all into one jacket. What technological evolutions will we see that could change what we wear?
    One should note that clothing from Europe, at least for the well-to-do, has been, historically, somewhat form fitting.
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  19. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    "The future is old"
    "The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed."
    - William Gibson

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