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Thread: SpaceX to fly Space Adventures tourist mission

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    SpaceX to fly Space Adventures tourist mission

    Space Adventures and SpaceX will launch civilians on Crew Dragon for non-ISS flights starting in 2021/2022.

    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz
    SpaceX will send four privately-paying space tourists on a Crew Dragon trip around the Earth.

    The mission is set to launch between late-2021 to mid-2022," broker Space Adventures said.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/18/spac...n-to-orbit.htm

    SpaceX signs deal to fly 4 space tourists around Earth in about two years SpaceX will fly four privately-paying people to orbit in its Crew Dragon capsule.
    ||
    SpaceX president and COO Gwynne Shotwell:

    This historic mission will forge a path to making spaceflight possible for all people who dream of it, and we are pleased to work with the Space Adventures team on the mission.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/18/spac...-to-orbit.html
    https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/...82465377701888

    https://youtu.be/NsVXz1Fsxbk

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    Yes, finally! Very nice to see, though it will take awhile to move from people worth at least tens of millions of dollars to “possible for all people who dream of it.”

    I don’t understand the bit mentioned in the second article that ‘The firm said this Crew Dragon mission will allow four individuals to “see planet Earth the way no one has since the Gemini program” of the 1960s.’

    What was different seeing Earth from Gemini or a Dragon capsule than Apollo, Skylab, the Space Shuttle, Almaz, Soyuz, Mir, the ISS or Tiangong?

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    ‘The firm said this Crew Dragon mission will allow four individuals to “see planet Earth the way no one has since the Gemini program” of the 1960s.
    Cramped, unshaven/unkempt, and sitting in your own excrement?

    CJSF
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    I assume they'll also have a paid professional on the crew?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    What the Gemini remark is referring to, is that Gemini (850 miles) went to an orbit higher than the ISS or the Space Shuttle went (250 miles). Crew Dragon will go as high as Gemini. Apollo went slightly higher though, but that might be down to instrument calibration.

    Note that from 850 miles altitude, your view of earth is still getting bigger so to speak. You'd need to go higher before seeing it full circle.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I assume they'll also have a paid professional on the crew?
    4 tourists, capacity of 7 people...so most likely yes.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    4 tourists, capacity of 7 people...so most likely yes.
    I would assume that one would always have at least 2 crew members, if for no other reason that if one was incapacitated the other could take over.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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    If you'll excuse me I need to crank up my GoFundMe account now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    If you'll excuse me I need to crank up my GoFundMe account now.
    That's what I need.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I would assume that one would always have at least 2 crew members, if for no other reason that if one was incapacitated the other could take over.
    Ah, anyone could fly that spacecraft who's played Mass Effect: Andromeda. Easy peas-y, everyone will be safe.

    So I do hope there will be a robotic or ground-control override to control the spacecraft in an emergency. Everyone could be incapacitated, like that Salyut-1 crew that died during reentry, or that Greek jet on which everyone suffered air loss, passed out, and died before the plane crashed (Helios Airways Flight 522). And, no matter how much money someone has, you never know what they might do. It pays to be careful.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Feb-19 at 05:28 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    What the Gemini remark is referring to, is that Gemini (850 miles) went to an orbit higher than the ISS or the Space Shuttle went (250 miles). Crew Dragon will go as high as Gemini. Apollo went slightly higher though, but that might be down to instrument calibration.
    Ah, that explains it, thanks.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Ah, anyone could fly that spacecraft if you've seen Mass Effect: Andromeda. Easy peas-y, everyone will be safe.

    So I do hope there will be a robotic or ground-control override to control the spacecraft.
    Flight is largely computer controlled (as shown in the crew Dragon test) and there is some remote capability (as used by ISS crew in docking testing) but I don’t know the extent of remote control functionality. Though I would guess a lot, because why not? I expect there would be at least one astronaut/pilot but really mostly there if an emergency comes up and to make sure passengers follow procedure.

    I also expect passengers will get fairly extensive training, so I wouldn’t put it past them to get some limited capsule control training.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Cramped, unshaven/unkempt, and sitting in your own excrement?

    CJSF
    It’s a five day flight. If I were going, I would take some imodium and go on a minimal diet starting a little before flight. There was one Apollo astronaut (don’t recall which) that basically did that, didn’t use a collection bag on board and was a bit concerned when he returned that he might have an accident before Nixon finished his comments. Luckily, he managed.

    Dragon should have more room than the tiny Gemini, but they are fitting a good number of people in there.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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    "Low residue" diet?
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    "Low residue" diet?
    That's what the long duration flights before visits to space stations and the shuttle was served to astronauts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    It’s a five day flight. If I were going, I would take some imodium and go on a minimal diet starting a little before flight. There was one Apollo astronaut (don’t recall which) that basically did that, didn’t use a collection bag on board and was a bit concerned when he returned that he might have an accident before Nixon finished his comments. Luckily, he managed.
    Bill Anders, Apollo 8.

    https://complex34.tumblr.com/post/14...agement-system

    The food on Apollo 8 was specially formulated to produce as little residue as possible, but Anders wasn’t taking any chances. He started his own low-residue diet a few days before launch. Six days was a long time, but he was determined. He’d go all the way to the moon and back on Lomotil, if he had to.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2020-Feb-19 at 06:18 PM. Reason: quote

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    You know, I like gravity just fine.
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    On the bright side, there is no backsplash in zero g. Or wait, there's the potential of a permanent backsplash. I never wanted to go into space anyway...
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    1) Crew Dragon has a toilet & privacy screen

    2) Crew Dragon can be flown from the ground, but is normally fully autonomous including self-docking/un-docking.

    3) the control systems are triple redundant with voting logic; if one of the 3 controls involved shows bad data it's voted off the island & rebooted. 3 redundant displays, redundant plumbing & valves, engine controllers, etc.

    4) it's likely at least two passengers will receive training on the controls including the Chicken Buttons: DEORBIT NEXT (orbit, to pre-selected sites) and DEORBIT NOW. There's also a manual launch abort handle. Why 2? 2 command seats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    It’s a five day flight. If I were going, I would take some imodium and go on a minimal diet starting a little before flight. There was one Apollo astronaut (don’t recall which) that basically did that, didn’t use a collection bag on board and was a bit concerned when he returned that he might have an accident before Nixon finished his comments. Luckily, he managed.

    Dragon should have more room than the tiny Gemini, but they are fitting a good number of people in there.
    I did that to myself by accident in High School when I didn’t understand the difference between Imodium and Pepto-Bismol. After a few days the stomach pains were terrible.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

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    "DEORBIT NOW". Now that's a button I hope requires serious force and perseverance to switch. Not something you'd want to program on the bottom right of a touch screen next to the "OK" button.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nicolas View Post
    "deorbit now". Now that's a button i hope requires serious force and perseverance to switch. Not something you'd want to program on the bottom right of a touch screen next to the "ok" button. :d


    They're physical. Last I heard they've moved and have covers & authenticaton, but...

    DEORBIT NOW.jpg

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    Heh, “cabin depress” too! I would expect something more like 2001: A Space Odyssey with a warning buzzer.

    Always loved this scene:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gpwvJzcfL1w

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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    Shouldn't those "dramatic consequences" buttons have little clear plastic flip-up covers over them, like nuclear launch switches? Just sayin.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Shouldn't those "dramatic consequences" buttons have little clear plastic flip-up covers over them, like nuclear launch switches? Just sayin.
    Pretty sure that’s still a mockup and not a final design.

    In practice I would expect that the buttons roughly correspond to the abort options built into the Apollo and Shuttle systems. What is not clear are the dependencies to activating the systems. I assume Spacex has its own abort modes and deorbit controls/procedures.

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    If you press the "execture command" button labeleled "cabin fire", what would happen? I assume a dozen Not A Flamethrowers would set the cabin ablaze?

    (I have an MSc in human-machine interaction, I'm sensitive to this kind of logically wrong labels...)
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    If you press the "execture command" button labeleled "cabin fire", what would happen? I assume a dozen Not A Flamethrowers would set the cabin ablaze?

    (I have an MSc in human-machine interaction, I'm sensitive to this kind of logically wrong labels...)
    Wouldn’t that trigger fire extinguishers? Presumably it would be what you press if there is ALREADY a fire.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Wouldn’t that trigger fire extinguishers? Presumably it would be what you press if there is ALREADY a fire.
    If the passengers were drunk and unruly, perhaps the pilots might cool them off with some CO2 foam.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    If the passengers were drunk and unruly, perhaps the pilots might cool them off with some CO2 foam.
    Ah yes, the “Shut the ^%#* Up” button.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Wouldn’t that trigger fire extinguishers? Presumably it would be what you press if there is ALREADY a fire.
    Most likely, but that's not what the text on the button says. And I can't cope with that.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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