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Thread: Seeing if I can prove a technical arXiv.org paper right or wrong, just for fun

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Have no WinZip, not able to buy it at this time, might have limited funds if I don't get paid from being assessed as nonessential to work, then sent home due to CV. Will see what I can do.
    Grab 7zip - it is free and I find it better than WinZip.

    Edit to add: Of course before you take any software recommendations from random people on the internet you should do your own research to make sure the software is seen to be safe and ensure you get it from the official site and not a site that will bundle malware with it.
    Last edited by Shaula; 2020-Mar-23 at 05:37 PM.

  2. #32
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    Newer version of above, with many stars from w/in 20 LY added in, including Sirius, Procyon, Sol, and the two Alpha Centauri stars. You get an idea of where the trend is going in the upper right. Note break in line of M-dwarfs.
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  3. #33
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    Even newer view, with 1,001 points, I'm pooped. Biggest stars are Vega, Sirius, Fomalhaut, Altair, and Procyon.
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #34
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    Did I prove the paper right or wrong? I can't derive the equations, but I am not entirely convinced there is a smooth transition from one type of planet to another, and the ice giants/Neptunian part is pretty vague, like a clump or cloud instead of anything like a straight line. Brown dwarfs and gas giants (including Saturn) are a tight clump, much tighter than expected, with a clear division when going to actual stars. My table is better only in that it includes more provable data points than the original, and it is in one unit, in terms of Earth and not in terms of Earth, Jupiter, and the Sun.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Mar-24 at 01:30 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #35
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    Reduced the point size of the diamonds to pt 3 and turned them into triangles to show more space between them. This reveals just how scattered the ice giants/Neptunians are, and how compacted the gas giants and brown dwarfs are, forming a kind of turtle-shell, if you will, flattened bottom and rounded top. Terrestrial planets and small stars (excluding white dwarfs) are revealed to be quite compacted and linear on the graph.

    Thoughts from anyone?
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #36
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    More focus on upper right quadrant.
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #37
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    More focus on lower left quadrant.
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Have no WinZip, not able to buy it at this time, might have limited funds if I don't get paid from being assessed as nonessential to work, then sent home due to CV. Will see what I can do.
    Since you mention WinZip, I assume you're using a version of Microsoft Windows (hopefully Windows 10, given the current malware threat landscape). Zip is included in Windows. You don't have to use a 3rd party program like WinZip. (Zip is also included with Linux and MacOS.)

    One way to create a Zip archive is to right-mouse-button click in the empty area of a file-manager window and select the menu option "New... Compressed (zipped) Folder". That'll create an empty Zip file. You can double-click on any Zip folder to see what's in it, and then drag-and-drop files into it or out of it.

    Alternatively, you can install the free program 7Zip, which supports additional archive formats, like tar, gzipped tar, RAR, ISO and their proprietary 7z.
    Selden

  9. #39
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    Not at home, but yes I am using Windows 10. Will try this at home. Thank you!

    Should tell how I built the database. Got data from the .eu site, then converted mass and radius figures into Earth equivalents thru whole chart. If mass in solar figures, multiply by 332,946 or as precise as possible. Solar radii, multiply by 109. Jupiter figures, multiply by etc. Once you get 3 columns (name of celestial objects, earth masses, earth radii), create 2 more columns =log10(Bx) and =log10(Cx), then create graph using those columns for log Earth mass (x axis) and log Earth radii (y axis). Tinker with points and axes to suit. Dinner is ready.

    Easy to add more data as long as proper conversions done. I added a lot of nearby stars and solar system objects to fill out ends of chart.

    All of this is offered free, no rights reserved. Hope to post data soon. Please enjoy.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Mar-24 at 08:41 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #40
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    Zipped my file (hooray!) but cannot attach it to post here. Any suggestions for how to get it here for everyone to enjoy? It's a zip file with one Excel file in it.

    The attachments thinger says ZIP is a valid file attachment. Is this not true anymore? The file zipped is 100 KB.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #41
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    Good Morning,

    I am serving up Roger's files on my google drive. The directory is here.

    No log in is required, no editing of the online files, but you can download them.

    Have a great day!

    Phil
    Solfe

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Good Morning,

    I am serving up Roger's files on my google drive. The directory is here.

    No log in is required, no editing of the online files, but you can download them. Have a great day! Phil
    Thank you, sir!

    The entries marked in light yellow are the ones I added. Light blue are known ice bodies, terrestrial types.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Thank you, sir!

    The entries marked in light yellow are the ones I added. Light blue are known ice bodies, terrestrial types.
    Hmmm. I think everyone's best option is to download. Google Docs will happily try to convert the .xlsm to html on the fly, but it doesn't seem to work on that one file. I did open it in Libre Office and it looks good, so I don't know. I don't want to convert the file to Google Sheets format, because that would commit people to having Google Drive or Sheets.

    Sorry about that.

    Phil
    Solfe

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    Hmmm. I think everyone's best option is to download. Google Docs will happily try to convert the .xlsm to html on the fly, but it doesn't seem to work on that one file. I did open it in Libre Office and it looks good, so I don't know. I don't want to convert the file to Google Sheets format, because that would commit people to having Google Drive or Sheets.

    Sorry about that. Phil
    No problem. On the good side, you get 1,001 celestial bodies to graph any way you like.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #45
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    I notice a peculiar gap in the stellar upper right of the graph between EV Lacertae and Kapteyn's star, which are two stars I added to the graph. Without them, the graph gap would be wider. Legit gap, or just missing some red dwarfs by accident?
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    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Mar-25 at 04:27 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #46
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    Just downloaded a planet table from NASA, https://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltec...config=planets

    Not using the mass-sin-I masses, too inaccurate. Will see what this one does.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  17. #47
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    As others have commented, the NASA Archive Exoplanet Table and the European version do not work together, having different values for some planetary masses and radii, as well as different planets. If you are looking for all planets with precise (if not accurate) radii and masses, use the .eu version, as it has more of them.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    As others have commented, the NASA Archive Exoplanet Table and the European version do not work together, having different values for some planetary masses and radii, as well as different planets. If you are looking for all planets with precise (if not accurate) radii and masses, use the .eu version, as it has more of them.
    I got my own GoogleSheets and uploaded this spreadsheet, which combined the EU and NASA Exoplanet Archives into one, only planets with precise masses and radii. Small, regular-print entries are from NASA, bold name entries are from EU. You should be able to download this, but if not, tell me so I can fix it. You can modify the sheet by deleting out the duplicates. I would delete the NASA duplicates and keep the unique NASA entries. Note that this list is in alphabetic order by planet name.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1C0g.../view?ths=true
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #49
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    Possibly an important paper, need to check it.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.13348
    From Super-Earths to Mini-Neptunes: Implications of a Surface on Atmospheric Circulation
    Erin M May, Emily Rauscher
    (Submitted on 30 Mar 2020)
    It is well known that planets with radii between that of Earth and Neptune have been the most commonly detected to-date. To classify these planets as either terrestrial or gaseous, typically we turn to mass-radius relations and composition curves to determine the likelihood of such a planet being rocky or gaseous. While these methods have set a likely transition radius of approximately 1.5 R⊕, we cannot expect that any change between terrestrial and gaseous compositions will be a sharp cut-off, and composition curve predictions result in ambiguous designations for planets right near this transition radius. In this work we present 3D general circulation models of transition planets, wherein we study the effects of a surface on observable quantities such as the latitudinal variations and eclipse depths. We present our updated GCM, validated on the circulation of Earth, before discussing our modeling choices for this transition planet. Finally, we discuss the results of this study and explore the prospects of detecting the presence of a surface through observations of secondary eclipses in the future.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #50
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    Ran a new copy of the chart, showing two new items:

    1. Seven white dwarf stars (Sirius B, Procyon B, etc., those close to Earth), to the right of Earth (0, 0) in the graph, in a small clump, all being about the size of Earth; and,
    2. The place at which 1.5 Earth radii appears in the exponential chart, about 0.176 in the vertical axis (see article in previous post). It looks like some kind of change takes place in the clump of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes about there, but it is hard to tell.
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  21. #51
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    I guess that's it for this. If anyone tries this graph, let me know what you get.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #52
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    Thanks for your work. This has been informative!

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