Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Moon landing in 2024 - how will it work

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    239

    Moon landing in 2024 - how will it work

    I understand the lunar gateway is no longer on the 'critical path' to the ambitious 2024 Moon landing: https://spacenews.com/nasa-takes-gat...-lunar-return/. As much as I can gather, the revised plan is still to fly an uncrewed lunar lander into lunar orbit, where the Orion MPCV will dock with it?

    I want to understand what prevents us just repeating the Apollo mission plan - i.e. launch everything on the one rocket. Is the problem that there'd be too much mass for the SLS to launch in one go or too much mass for the Orion MPCV to fly all the way from Earth orbit to the Moon? Or both? Or is it something else altogether? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    22,074
    I'm just guessing to the answer, but I suspect that it will take more flights for the larger capacity rockets to be "man rated". They can use the big ones to launch unmanned stuff into place. Eventually the SLS or the BFR will be tested enough that they can launch manned missions, but not by 2024.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    239
    Thanks. I'm not really asking about whether the 2024 date is feasible (it probably isn't), I'm asking why the 'lunar module' has to be flown separately. Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Cheap Astronomy View Post
    I understand the lunar gateway is no longer on the 'critical path' to the ambitious 2024 Moon landing: https://spacenews.com/nasa-takes-gat...-lunar-return/. As much as I can gather, the revised plan is still to fly an uncrewed lunar lander into lunar orbit, where the Orion MPCV will dock with it?

    I want to understand what prevents us just repeating the Apollo mission plan - i.e. launch everything on the one rocket. Is the problem that there'd be too much mass for the SLS to launch in one go or too much mass for the Orion MPCV to fly all the way from Earth orbit to the Moon? Or both? Or is it something else altogether? Thanks.
    From what I read the ESA second stage does not have sufficient delta-v to launch as a single, like Apollo. I'm unable to find that information at present.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,410
    I'm in my early 70's and will be very surprised if humans return to the moon in my lifetime. Pleasantly surprised, but surprised. Unless they are Chinese.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,504
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm in my early 70's and will be very surprised if humans return to the moon in my lifetime. Pleasantly surprised, but surprised. Unless they are Chinese.
    Well, judging from the example of Jeanne Calment, you might have fifty years!
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,843
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm in my early 70's and will be very surprised if humans return to the moon in my lifetime. Pleasantly surprised, but surprised. Unless they are Chinese.
    At this point, I would put a private effort before the Chinese and the Chinese before anything using the SLS.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    239
    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    From what I read the ESA second stage does not have sufficient delta-v to launch as a single, like Apollo. I'm unable to find that information at present.
    Thanks - that's what I've gathered from research to date. The SLS has enough grunt on paper (and hopefully whenever it flies), but the European Service Module can't deal with that much mass.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,504
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Unless they are Chinese.
    Plot twist: having heard “the next people on the moon will be Chinese” enough to consider it a prophecy, NASA sends Chinese-Americans.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,124
    Based on Wikipedia:

    SLS payload Block 1B Crew - 34,000–37,000 kg
    SLS payload Block 1B Cargo - 37,000–40,000 kg
    SLS payload Block 2 Cargo - 48,000 kg

    Saturn V - payload to TLI - 48,600 kg (This included the CM, CSM and the LEM and associated equipment such as the lunar rovers and experiments.)

    So based on this quick read the Artemis program apparently means to launch about 50% more payload than the Apollo program, and thus needs more lifting capacity.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •