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Thread: Pangaea thread

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Pangaea thread

    New map of Pangaea shows modern cities and borders, plus video shows possible continental movements to produce a new Pangaea.

    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/inc...odern-borders/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #2
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    Wow!

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    New map of Pangaea shows modern cities and borders, plus video shows possible continental movements to produce a new Pangaea.

    https://www.visualcapitalist.com/inc...odern-borders/

    A beauty. Thank you.

    Think of all the large rivers that would (?) have dumped into what would become the gap between Africa-Asia and the Americas.

    Hmm. . . .

  3. #3
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    It's interesting, but I have some problems with some of the water body choices. Take "Hudson Lake", for example. Hudson Bay (as well as nearly all the northern lakes in North America) owe either their outright genesis or their morphologies are heavily dependent on the last couple of ice ages, over the past few hundred thousand years. I get they are trying to show modern boundaries and such, but then don't label something like "Hudson Lake". Call it Hudon Bay, as a reference. Also, didn't penisular Florida rise much later than this epoch?

    CJSF
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  4. #4
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    I give it an A

    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    It's interesting, but I have some problems with some of the water body choices. Take "Hudson Lake", for example. Hudson Bay (as well as nearly all the northern lakes in North America) owe either their outright genesis or their morphologies are heavily dependent on the last couple of ice ages, over the past few hundred thousand years. I get they are trying to show modern boundaries and such, but then don't label something like "Hudson Lake". Call it Hudon Bay, as a reference. Also, didn't penisular Florida rise much later than this epoch?

    CJSF
    The edes of the continental shelves could be better defined also. My reaction is so what. I don't want to do that work. Within reasonable limits, this is a nice piece of work.
    Last edited by John Mendenhall; 2020-May-04 at 06:51 PM. Reason: typo

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    It's interesting, but I have some problems with some of the water body choices. Take "Hudson Lake", for example. Hudson Bay (as well as nearly all the northern lakes in North America) owe either their outright genesis or their morphologies are heavily dependent on the last couple of ice ages, over the past few hundred thousand years. I get they are trying to show modern boundaries and such, but then don't label something like "Hudson Lake". Call it Hudon Bay, as a reference. Also, didn't penisular Florida rise much later than this epoch?
    I don't think it's intended to be taken as a serious work of palaeogeography--it's a kind of fantasy Pangaea. The continents were never actually arranged like that. The central Atlantic was opening before the Palaeotethys closed, for instance.

    (For anyone who wants some real detailed maps, I recommend Torsvik and Cocks's Earth History And Palaeogeography. The amount we now know about this is jawdropping.)

    Grant Hutchison

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