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Thread: NASA director resigns

  1. #1
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    NASA director resigns

    What's the most plausible reason for this resignation at this time?
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ic-launch.html

  2. #2
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    He didn't fit in with the Administrator.

  3. #3
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    Well, a little more than that. From CNN:

    The incident in question was related to the Artemis Program, a source familiar with the matter told CNN Business.

    The Artemis Program seeks to return astronauts to the moon by 2024, which was announced by the Trump administration last year and has been criticized as unrealistic. The source familiar with the reason for Loverro's departure said the issue centered on contracts that were awarded earlier this year for development of lunar landers, or vehicles that can carry astronauts to the moon's surface.
    Just pure speculation but I wonder if this has anything to do with the SpaceX lander proposal and excluding Boeing.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    Well, a little more than that. From CNN:



    Just pure speculation but I wonder if this has anything to do with the SpaceX lander proposal and excluding Boeing.
    I was thinking more of Blue Origin, but the forum rules do not permit me to say why.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #5
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    What I have seen is some well grounded (but unfounded) speculation that he was trying to push Boeing into making a more competitive bid. They did not win, but someone brought that (unethical) attempt to the IG's attention and he was allowed to resign. He seems to have had his heart in the right place, but went too far to support what he thinks is the only (barely) way the 2024 date is reachable: SLS with Boeing.

    Personally I think there's no chance whatever of 2024 or anything of Artemis making it to the moon at all.

    CJSF
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  6. #6
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    Answered here (tl;dr is that he violated the Procurement Integrity Act)
    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...hy-it-matters/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    What I have seen is some well grounded (but unfounded) speculation that he was trying to push Boeing into making a more competitive bid. They did not win, but someone brought that (unethical) attempt to the IG's attention and he was allowed to resign. He seems to have had his heart in the right place, but went too far to support what he thinks is the only (barely) way the 2024 date is reachable: SLS with Boeing.


    CJSF
    So he had to resign because he was clinically insane?

  8. #8
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    It's been suggested that Mr. Loverro was under intolerable pressure to meet the politically imposed Artemis 2024 deadline, and that he believed the Boeing plan had the only real chance of meeting that schedule. He may have seen no realistic alternative to the actions he took. The better solution, it seems, would be to replace the undue haste of the present schedule, with the original plan for 2028.
    Last edited by Ross 54; 2020-May-22 at 02:21 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    It's been suggested that Mr. Loverro was under intolerable pressure to meet the politically imposed Artemis 2024 deadline, and that he believed the Boeing plan had the only real chance of meeting that schedule. He may have seen no realistic alternative to the actions he took. The better solution, it seems, would be to replace the undue haste of the present schedule, with the original plan for 2028.
    Even if that is exactly the case, he most certainly broke ethical policy if not the law in what he did. You can't claim good intentions to get out of that. If I did anything remotely like that at my job I would be summarily fired. The fact that certain members of the current administration seem to be able to get away with that sort of thing perhaps indicates Loverro was not considered highly enough placed for it (or just unliked).

    CJSF
    "Off went his rocket at the speed of light
    Flying so fast there was no day or night
    Messing around with the fabric of time
    He knows who's guilty 'fore there's even a crime

    Davy, Davy Crockett
    The buckskin astronaut
    Davy, Davy Crockett
    There's more than we were taught"

    -They Might Be Giants, "The Ballad Of Davy Crockett (In Outer Space)"


    lonelybirder.org

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross 54 View Post
    It's been suggested that Mr. Loverro was under intolerable pressure to meet the politically imposed Artemis 2024 deadline, and that he believed the Boeing plan had the only real chance of meeting that schedule. He may have seen no realistic alternative to the actions he took. The better solution, it seems, would be to replace the undue haste of the present schedule, with the original plan for 2028.
    Which begs the question, how could he possibly come to that conclusion based on Boeing's performance in the last few years? They've been identified as being responsible for many of the delays and cost overruns with SLS and Starliner has become an embarrassment. What would make anyone think they would now be able to deliver a lander on a fixed time scale?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    The fact that certain members of the current administration seem to be able to get away with that sort of thing [...]
    Okay, let's nip this in the bud before someone gets infracted and/or suspended. This issue isn't unique to this or any other administration. It has cropped up in the prior, prior2, and priorn administrations. Rule 12 does allow for discussion of the "[p]olitical impact upon space programs, exploration, and science" but it has to be polite and neutral.
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  12. #12
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    What's really sad is that he seems to have broken the rules to help Boeing get the job and they STILL couldn't manage a decent proposal. I weep for my former company.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #13
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    "It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into."

    Loverro was a true believer in all-in-one big-launcher solutions and really didn't like distributed launch approaches, he'd rather rely on a couple launches from a never-flown SLS than on multiple Falcon 9/Heavy or Atlas V launches. He seemed to treat rendezvous operations (like those we've conducted for decades and which will be utterly critical to any large exploration or space infrastructure project in the future) as being unacceptably risky, something to be minimized at any cost.

    Even if the first SLS test flight not going absolutely perfectly would be enough to turn the 2024 date from "might be possible if we're lucky" to "completely impossible", he'd still rather rely on Boeing executing on time and correctly on the first try. He seems to have become so set on Boeing being the "right answer" that when they themselves demonstrated it to be the wrong one by not even submitting an acceptable proposal, he tried to intervene to "correct" things.

  14. #14
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    NASA names new head of human spaceflight

    Pretty much the best possible person.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...al-background/

    NASA’s new chief of human spaceflight has a commercial background

    On Friday morning, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that he had selected Kathy Lueders to serve as the space agency's new chief of human spaceflight. In this position, she will help set human spaceflight policy and implement it across the agency. Her top mandate will be getting humans to the Moon by 2024, or soon thereafter.
    >
    >
    As program manager for Commercial Crew—which recently saw SpaceX launch NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station—Lueders has led the one big-ticket program for the space agency that has delivered for Bridenstine. Other high-profile programs, including the Space Launch System rocket and James Webb Space Telescope, have continued to experience delays.
    >

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What's really sad is that he seems to have broken the rules to help Boeing get the job and they STILL couldn't manage a decent proposal. I weep for my former company.
    I weep for the real Boeing, not the name-jacked monstrosity created by McDonnell-Douglass.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Her top mandate will be getting humans to the Moon by 2024, or soon thereafter.
    Fixed it for everyone.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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