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Thread: Crew Dragon Demo-2

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Are those specs being worn?
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Yup. Cool! I was wondering if they are tuned for the distance to the panel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    So medical standards have dropped a bit.
    I'd forgotten I was going to respond to this. Here is a picture of John Young commanding the very first shuttle flight. While wearing reading glasses. I was instantly reminded of this while watching the preparations the other day.

    The weather looks distinctly unpromising for tomorrow.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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  3. #93
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    This is what you get when you put your launch site in Florida. Should have put it in England. The English weather is nothing but clear skies and sunshine based on the last couple of months.

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    Weather is GO

  5. #95
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    Do those visors just snap shut?

  6. #96
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    I'm watching an interview with the launch abort manager (why is that guy giving interviews 40 minutes before launch???) and he mentioned that there is a recovery team in the Gulf of Mexico. Is that an abort mode for shortly after launch or after almost one orbit? I would think if they could get back to the Gulf they could ATO...but maybe not.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'd forgotten I was going to respond to this. Here is a picture of John Young commanding the very first shuttle flight. While wearing reading glasses. I was instantly reminded of this while watching the preparations the other day.
    And if someone like John Young would not be good enough to be an astronaut, this species would have a problem. As long as your eyesight can be corrected near and far to 20/20 with moderate spectacles, I don't see a problem for the kind of space missions we have. They're not jet fighters that have to spot the slightest dot as far away as possible to survive.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I'm watching an interview with the launch abort manager (why is that guy giving interviews 40 minutes before launch???) and he mentioned that there is a recovery team in the Gulf of Mexico. Is that an abort mode for shortly after launch or after almost one orbit? I would think if they could get back to the Gulf they could ATO...but maybe not.
    Never mind. Further digging shows this is a standby recovery team for return from orbit in case Dragon can't reach the Atlantic or Pacific.

  9. #99
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    Why is it an instantaneous launch window now that propellent loading has started? I get that you can't leave cryogenic propellents in the rocket for a long time, but a hold for 10 minutes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Why is it an instantaneous launch window now that propellent loading has started? I get that you can't leave cryogenic propellents in the rocket for a long time, but I hold for 10 minutes?
    Apparently not even that long:

    "We do the flight analysis assuming that the temperatures of the propellants are below a certain amount, so that we know how much performance is available to the rocket — how much margin we're going to have," SpaceX principal integration engineer John Insprucker said during Wednesday's launch webcast.

    "Once you get into propellant loading at T-35 minutes, you have to go as soon as you get to zero," Insprucker said.

    Even waiting for a few minutes past T-0 would cause propellant temperatures to rise slightly, he added, "and that changes how much performance you get carrying into orbit. And we don't want to cut into those margins."

  11. #101
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    ABC News/National Geographic coverage has begun

  12. #102
    Less than 14 minutes to go and there is some blue sky around them. Now fueling the oxygen and liquid helium to keep everything cold.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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    Congratulations to SpaceX and NASA., Great landing of the first stage.

  14. #104
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    They named a droneship but not the spacecraft?

    Come on, with COO and President of SpaceX, the name is obvious. Gwamorous Gwynne. (Yaeger reference)

  15. #105
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    Perfect launch
    Booster landing
    Good orbit
    Good ECLSS checkout (environmental control life support system.)
    Nosecone/hatch cover opening.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    They named a droneship but not the spacecraft?

    Come on, with COO and President of SpaceX, the name is obvious. Gwamorous Gwynne. (Yaeger reference)
    It's up to the astronauts to name the vehicle, and they said they'd reveal it today. Probably once they get settled down.

  17. #107
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    Their zero gravity indicator was only visible for a few seconds, but appeared to be a shiny bead covered dragon.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #108
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    Orbital phasing burn coming up.

    After that, testing the manual flight controls.

  19. #109
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    Suits are off

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Their zero gravity indicator was only visible for a few seconds, but appeared to be a shiny bead covered dragon.
    Named "Tremor".
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
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    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    It's up to the astronauts to name the vehicle, and they said they'd reveal it today. Probably once they get settled down.
    And the chosen name is Endeavour.

  22. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    And the chosen name is Endeavour.
    This is the third Endeavour in the space program, right? Apollo, Shuttle, and Dragon?
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #113
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    Bob & Doug dock at ISS Sunday morning at 1029 Eastern

    They're doing 2 manual control tests, one already completed then another close to ISS.

    https://youtu.be/XgY4NKoT9SQ

  24. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Why is it an instantaneous launch window now that propellent loading has started? I get that you can't leave cryogenic propellents in the rocket for a long time, but a hold for 10 minutes?
    It's an instantaneous window to enable meeting up with ISS, not to do with propellants.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's an instantaneous window to enable meeting up with ISS, not to do with propellants.
    Err, it looks like it really is mostly to do with the propellants (my bold):

    "We do the flight analysis assuming that the temperatures of the propellants are below a certain amount, so that we know how much performance is available to the rocket — how much margin we're going to have," SpaceX principal integration engineer John Insprucker said during Wednesday's launch webcast.

    "Once you get into propellant loading at T-35 minutes, you have to go as soon as you get to zero," Insprucker said.

    Even waiting for a few minutes past T-0 would cause propellant temperatures to rise slightly, he added, "and that changes how much performance you get carrying into orbit. And we don't want to cut into those margins."

    That said, if the performance of the launch vehicle falls off with temperature rise then it will have definitely have a negative effect on achieving orbit and rendezvous. There's only so much they can do with the Draco thrusters.

  26. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    No no.. It's a giant fish (or salamander) about to swallow the ISS.

    CJSF
    Blofeld wants you to keep thinking that too. We never should have gone back to launching capsules. Riots, SPECTRE, etc...

    In all seriousness—an outstanding performance. More TV coverage of the ISS docking later this morning.
    Last edited by publiusr; 2020-May-31 at 06:46 AM.

  27. #117
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    Endeavour? That's Star Trek Picard levels of creativity. But then as Jodie Foster said, they didn't send poets.

    Also, is there any guard system for those touchscreens. Old fashioned buttons usually are guarded in some way plus the force required to press or flip many of the switches. It looks easy to accidentally brush the screens and inadvertently do stuff.

  28. #118
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    That question was asked here a while ago. Underneath the screens are some hardware buttons which appear to include a "confirm" function. They will have thought about this.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  29. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    Endeavour? That's Star Trek Picard levels of creativity. But then as Jodie Foster said, they didn't send poets.
    I was thinking that this is George Foreman level of creativity in naming.


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  30. #120
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    One thing we can say is that James Cook made a lasting impression.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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