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Thread: Is the Earth an Organic Distribution Machine??

  1. #1
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    Is the Earth an Organic Distribution Machine??

    As the solar wind rushes past earth is it plausible that it picks up organic matter floating in our upper atmosphere and distributes it throughout our solar system? It would be interesting to see if there are any differences in the solar wind before it hits the earth and it's composition afterwards.
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCaptain View Post
    As the solar wind rushes past earth is it plausible that it picks up organic matter floating in our upper atmosphere and distributes it throughout our solar system? It would be interesting to see if there are any differences in the solar wind before it hits the earth and it's composition afterwards.
    Not really plausible. Organic molecules, even simple ones, are just far too heavy for them to "float" to the outer layers of our magnetosphere, where the solar wind impinges on us. They'd need to be at high orbital distance.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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    A mechanism for getting organic material from Earth into space that seems more plausible based on our current knowledge, and for which there is some supportive evidence, is ejecta from large impacts. For example the famous https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allan_Hills_84001, a meteorite found in Antarctica and identified as originating on Mars. Researchers found interesting mineral formations in the meteorite that looked a lot like fossils of microbial life. Though ultimately the consensus became that the formations were more likely the result of inorganic processes because it is known that similar structures are caused on Earth by both organic and inorganic processes.

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    So you don't think that even the giant dust cloud heading toward the Americas isn't strong enough or high enough to get organics near to the edge of space?
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCaptain View Post
    So you don't think that even the giant dust cloud heading toward the Americas isn't strong enough or high enough to get organics near to the edge of space?
    The problem is that the magnetosphere (ie where the solar wind gets stopped by Earth's magnetic field) is a lot further out than the edge of space. The Karman Line is what is generally considered the "edge of space" and is only 62 miles up, where as the magnetosphere extends out approximately 40,000 miles at the closest point

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    I wonder if blue jets or sprites from virus filled T-Storms could serve as a boost

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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    I wonder if blue jets or sprites from virus filled T-Storms could serve as a boost
    How would electrical discharges act as significant transports for matter? It is rather like hypothesising that the reason we see puddles on the ground after a thunderstorm is that lightning brought the water down. Plus these are still thermosphere and below phenomena.

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    There are these interesting puffs of Mars atmosphere—-could there be an earthly equivalent?

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    How about from Enceladus? Does all the water/ice that gets ejected from this planet return to it's source?
    I know that I know nothing, so I question everything. - Socrates/Descartes

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCaptain View Post
    How about from Enceladus? Does all the water/ice that gets ejected from this planet return to it's source?
    It mostly goes into orbit around the primary; see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_torus
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

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